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Full text of "English folk songs from the southern Appalachians"

ISH Campbell 

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MAP SHOWING THE GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION OF THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS 

The thick line, which marks the boundaries of the mountain district, coincides, 
approximately, with the looo-foot contour 



English Folk Songs 

from the 

Southern Appalachians 

Comprising 122 Songs and Ballads, and 323 Tunes 



Collected by 

Olive Dame Campbell 
Cecil J. Sharp 



With an Introduction and Notes 



G. P. Putnam's Sons 

New York and London 

^be IRnickerbocftet press 

1917 



PUBLIC LIBIUR^ 

^^^m, lE^ox and 



L- 



Copyright, 1917 

OLIVE DAMH CAMPBELL 

CECIL J, '• SHARP 



Ube fl?nicfeerboc?!cc press, "IRcw 12orft 



INTRODUCTION 



The effort that has been made to collect and preserve in permanent 
form the folk-songs of England during the last twenty or thirty years 
has resulted in the salvage of many thousands of beautiful songs. It 
was pardonable, therefore, if those who, like myself, had assisted in the 
task had come to believe that the major part of the work had been 
completed. So far as the collection in England itself was concerned, 
this behef was no doubt veU fo.mded, Nevertheless, in arriving at this 
very consolatory conclusion, one " important, albeit not very obvious 
consideration had been pv^erloOKed, namely, the possibility that one or 
other of those EngHsh communities that lie scattered in various parts 
of the woild might provide as rood a field for the collector as England 
itself, and yield as bountiful and rich a harvest. The investigation 
which my colleague Mrs. Campbell began, and in which later on I came 
to bear a hand, has proved that at least one such community does in 
fact exist in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of North America. 
The region is an extensive one, covering some 1 10,000 square miles, 
and is considerably larger than England, Wales, and Scotland com- 
bined. It includes about one third of the total area of the States of 
North and South CaroHna, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, 
Alabama, and Georgia. * The total population exceeds five millions, or, 
excluding city dwellers, about three millions. 

The Country and its Inhabitants. The reader will, I think, be in a 
better position to appreciate and assess the value of the songs and ballads 
which form the major part of this volume if, by way of preface, I give 
some account of the way in which they were collected and record the 
impression which the inhabitants of this unique country made upon me. 
But I must bid him remember that I claim to speak with authority only 
with respect to that part of the mountain district into which I penetrated 
and that the statements and opinions which are now to follow must be 
accepted subject to this qualification. 
' See Frontispiece. 



iv Introduction 

I spent nine weeks only in the mountains, accompanied throughout 
by Miss Maud Karpeles, who took down, usually in shorthand, the words 
of the songs we heard, while I noted the tunes. Mr, John C. Campbell, 
the agent for the Southern Highland Division of the Russell Sage Foun- 
dation, went with us on our first expedition and afterwards directed our 
joumeyings and, in general, gave us the benefit of his very full knowledge 
of the country and its people. Our usual procedure was to stay at one 
or other of the Presbyterian Missionary Settlements and to make it our 
centre for a week or ten days while we visited the singers who lived 
within a walking radius. In this way we successively visited White 
Rock, Allanstand, Alleghany and Carmen, Big Laurel and Hot 
Springs, in North Carolina, and thus succeeded in exploring the 
major portion of what is known as the Laurel Country. Afterwards 
we spent ten days at Rocky Fork, Tenn., and a similar period at 
Charlottesville, Va. I should- a4d that had it not been for the generous 
hospitality extended to us by.the^beads of ; the . IVIissionary Settlements 
at which we sojourned, it would hav(?befeii;c}ui^e impossible to prosecute 
our work. • - 

The present inhabitants of the. Laurel Country are the direct de- 
scendants of the original settlers who were emigrants from England and, 
I suspect, the lowlands of Scotland. I was able to ascertain with some 
degree of certainty that the settlement of this particular section began 
about three or four generations ago, i.e. in the latter part of the eight- 
eenth century or early y^ars of the nineteenth. How many years 
prior to this the original emigration from England had taken place, I 
am unable to say; but it is fairly safe, I think, to conclude that the 
present-day residents of this section of the mountains are the de- 
scendants of those who left the shores of Britain some time in the 
eighteenth century. 

The region is from its inaccessibility a very secluded one. There 
are but few roads — most of them little better than mountain tracks — • 
and practically no railroads. Indeed, so remote and shut off from outside 
influence were, until quite recently, these sequestered mountain valleys 
that the inhabitants have for a hundred years or more been completely 
isolated and cut off from all traffic with the rest of the world. Their 
speech is English, not American, and, from the number of expressions 
they use which have long been obsolete elsewhere, and the old-fashioned 
way in which they pronounce many of their words, it is clear that they 
are talking the language of a past day, though exactly of what period I 
am not competent to decide. One peculiarity is perhaps worth the 



Introduction v 

noting, namely the pronunciation of the impersonal pronoun with an 
aspirate — "hit" — a practice that seems to be universal. 

Economically they are independent. As there are practically no 
available markets, little or no surplus produce is grown, each family 
extracting from its holding just what is needed to support life, and no 
more. They have very little money, barter in kind being the customary 
form of exchange. 

Many set the standard of bodily and material comfort perilously 
low, in order, presumably, that they may have the more leisure and 
so extract the maximum enjoyment out of Hfe. The majority live 
in log-cabins, more or less water-tight, usually, but not always, 
lighted with windows; but some have built larger and more comfortable 
homesteads. 

They are a leisurely, cheery people in their quiet way, in whom the 
social instinct is very highly developed. They dispense hospitahty with 
an openhanded generosity and are extremely interested in and friendly 
toward strangers, communicative and unsuspicious. "But surely you 
will tarry with us for the night? " was said to us on more than one occasion 
when, after paying an afternoon's visit, we rose to say good-bye. 

They know their Bible intimately and subscribe to an austere creed, 
charged with Calvinism and the unrelenting doctrines of determinism 
or fatalism. The majority we met were Baptists, but we met Methodists 
also, a few Presbyterians, and some who are attached to what is known 
as the "Hohness" sect, with whom, however, we had but little truck, as 
their creed forbids the singing of secular songs. 

They have an easy unaffected bearing and the unselfconscious 
manners of the well-bred. I have received salutations upon introduction 
or on bidding farewell, dignified and restrained, such as a courtier might 
make to his Sovereign. Our work naturally led to the making of many 
acquaintances, and, in not a few cases, to the formation of friendships of 
a more intimate nature, but on no single occasion did we receive anything 
, but courteous and friendly treatment. Strangers that we met in the 
course of our long walks would usually bow, doff the hat, and extend the 

hand, saying, "My name is ; what is yours?" an introduction which 

often led to a pleasant talk and sometimes to singing and the noting of 
interesting ballads. In their general characteristics they reminded me 
of the English peasant, with whom my work in England for the past 
fifteen years or more has brought me into close contact. There are 
differences, however. The mountaineer is freer in his manner, more 
alert, and less inarticulate than his British prototype, and bears no trace 



vi Introduction 

of the obsequiousness of manner which, since the Enclosure Acts robbed 
him of his economic independence and made of him a hired labourer, has 
unhappily characterized the English villager. The difference is seen in 
the way the mountaineer, as I have already said, upon meeting a stranger, 
removes his hat, offers his hand and enters into conversation, where the 
English labourer would touch his cap,' or pull his forelock, and pass on. 

A few of those we met were able to read and write, but the majority 
were illiterate. They are, however, good talkers, using an abundant 
vocabulary racily and often picturesquely. Although uneducated, in 
the sense in which that term is usually understood, they possess that 
elemental wisdom, abundant knowledge and intuitive understanding 
which those only who live in constant touch with Nature and face to face 
with reality seem to be able to acquire. It is to be hoped that the 
schools which are beginning to be established in some districts, chiefly 
in the vicinity of the Missionary Settlements, will succeed in giving them 
what they lack without infecting their ideals, or depriving them of the 
charm of manner and the many engaging qualities which so happily 
distinguish them. 

Physically, they are strong and of good stature, though usually 
spare in figure. Their features are clean-cut and often handsome; while 
their complexions testify to wholesome, out-of-door habits. They carry 
themselves superbly, and it was a never-failing delight to note their 
swinging, easy gait and the sureness with which they would negotiate the 
foot-logs over the creeks, the crossing of which caused us many anxious 
moments. The children usually go about barefooted, and, on occasion 
their elders too, at any rate in the summer time. Like all primitive 
peoples, or those who live under primitive conditions, they attain to 
physical maturity at a very early age, especially the women, with whom 
marriage at thirteen, or even younger, is not unknown. 

I have been told that in past days there were blood-feuds — a species 
of vendetta — which were pursued for generations between members of 
certain families or clans; but, whenever circumstances connected with 
these were related to me, I was always given to understand that this 
barbarous custom had long since been discontinued. I have heard, too, 
that there is a good deal of illicit distilHng of com spirit by "moonshiners", 
as they are called, in defiance of the State excise laws; but of this, again, I 
personally saw nothing and heard but little. Nor did I vSee any con- 
sumption of alcohol in the houses I visited. On the other hand, the 
chewing or snuffing of tobacco is a common habit amongst young and 
old; but, curiously enough, no one smokes. Indeed, many looked 



Introduction yii 

askance at my pipe and I rarely succeeded in extracting more than a halfT 
hearted assent to my request for permission to hght it. 

That the ilhterate may nevertheless reach a high level of culture 
will surprise those only who imagine that education and cultivation are 
convertible terms. The reason, I take it, why these mountain people, 
albeit unlettered, have acquired so many of the essentials of culture is 
partly to be attributed to the large amount of leisure they enjoy, with- 
out which, of course, no cultural development is possible, but chiefly 
to the fact that they have one and all entered at birth into the full 
enjoyment of their racial heritage. Their language, wisdom, man- 
ners, and the many graces of life that are theirs, are merely racial 
attributes which have been gradually acquired and accumulated in 
past centuries and handed down generation by generation, each genera- 
tion adding its quotum to that which it received. It must be re- 
membered, also, that in their everyday lives they are immune frorn 
that continuous, grinding, mental pressure, due to the attempt to "make 
a living, " from which nearly all of us in the modem world suffer. Here 
no one is "on the make"; commercial competition and social rivalries 
are unknown. In this respect, at any rate, they have the advantage 
over those who habitually spend the greater part of every day in 
preparing to live, in acquiring the technique of life, rather than in its 
enjoyment. 

I have dwelt at considerable length upon this aspect of the mountain 
life because it was the first which struck me and further, because, without 
a realization of this background, it will be difBcult for the reader to follow 
intelligently what I have to say. But before I leave this part of my 
subject I must, in self-justification, add that I am aware that the 
outsider does not always see the whole of the game, and that I am fully 
conscious that there is another and less lovely side of the picture 
which in my appreciation I have ignored. I have deliberately done so 
because that side has, I believe, already been emphasized, perhaps with 
unnecessary insistence, by other observers. ,■.,■ nr. i ,.:. 

The Singers and their Songs. I\Iy sole purpose in visiting this 
country was to collect the traditional songs and ballads which I had heard 
from Mrs. Campbell, and knew from other sources, were, still being sung 
there. I naturally expected to find conditions very similar to those 
which I had encountered in England when engaged on the same quest. 
But of this I was soon to be agreeably disillusioned. Instead, for instance, 
of having to confine my attention to the aged, as in England where no 



viii Introduction 

one under the age of seventy ordinarily possesses the folk-song tradition, 
I discovered that I could get what I wanted from pretty nearly every one 
I met, young and old. In fact, I found myself for the first time in my 
life in a community in which singing was as common and almost as 
universal a practice as speaking. With us, of course, singing is an 
entertainment, something done by others for our delectation, the cult 
and close preserve of a professional caste of specialists. The fact has 
been forgotten that singing is the one form of artistic expression that 
can be practised without any preliminary study or special training ; that 
every normal human being can sing just as every one can talk; and 
that it is, consequently, just as ridiculous to restrict the practice of 
singing to a chosen few as it would be to limit the art of speaking to 
orators, professors of elocution and other specialists. In an ideal 
society every child in his earliest years would as a matter of course 
develop this inborn capacity and learn to sing the songs of his fore- 
fathers in the same natural and unselfconscious way in which he now 
learns his mother tongue and the elementary literature of the nation to 
which he belongs. 

And it was precisely this ideal state of things that I found existing 
in the mountain communities. So closely, indeed, is the practice of this 
particular art interwoven with the ordinary avocations of everyday life 
that singers, unable to recall a song I had asked for, would often make 
some such remark as, "Oh, if only I were driving the cows home I could 
sing it at once!". On one occasion, too, I remember that a small boy 
tried to edge himself into my cabin in which a man was singing to me 
and, when I asked him what he wanted, he said, "I always like to go 
where there is sweet music. " Of course, I let him in and, later 
on, when my singer failed to remember a song I had asked for, my little 
visitor came to the rescue and straightway sang the ballad from beginning 
to end in the true traditional manner, and in a way which would have 
shamed many a professional vocalist (see No. 15, B). I have no doubt 
but that this delightful habit of making beautiful music at all times and 
in all places largely compensates for any deficiencies in the matter of 
reading and writing. 

But, of course, the cultural value of singing must depend upon the 
kind of songs that are sung. Happily, in this matter the hillsman 
is not called upon to exercise any choice, for the only music, or, at 
any rate, the only secular music, that he hears and has, therefore, any 
opportunity of learning is that which his British forefathers brought with 
them from their native country and has since survived by oral tradition. 



Introduction ix 

When, by chance, the text of a modem street-song succeeds in 
penetrating into the mountains it is at once mated to a traditional tune 
{e.g. No. 99) and sometimes still further purified by being moulded into 
the form of a traditional ballad (see No. 87). But this happens but rarely, 
for, strange as it may seem, these mountain valleys are in fact far less 
affected by modern musical influences than the most remote and secluded 
English village, where there is always a Parsonage or Manor House, or 
both, to link it to the outside world. 

We found little or no difficulty in persuading those we visited to sing 
to us. To prove our interest in the subject and to arouse their memories, 
we would ourselves sometimes sing folk-songs that I had collected in 
England, choosing, for preference, those with which they were un- 
acquainted. Very often they misunderstood our requirements and 
would give us hymns instead of the secular songs and ballads which we 
wanted; but that was befoie we had learned to ask for "love-songs," 
which is their name for these ditties. It was evident, too, that it was 
often assumed that strangers like ourselves could have but one object 
and that to "improve", and their relief was obvious when they found 
that we came not to give but to receive. 

It is no exaggeration to say that some of the hours I passed sitting 
on the porch (/. e. verandah) of a log-cabin, talking and listening to songs 
were amongst the pleasantest I have ever spent. Very often we would 
call upon some of our friends early in the morning and remain till dusk, 
sharing the mid-day meal with the family, and I would go away in the 
evening with the feeling that I had never before been in a more musical 
atmosphere, nor benefited more greatly by the exchange of musical 
confidences. 

The singers displayed much interest in watching me take down their 
music in my note-book and when at the conclusion of a song I hummed 
over the tune to test the accuracy of my transcription they were as 
delighted as though I had successfully performed a conjuring trick. 

The mountain singers sing in very much the same way as English 
folk-singers, in the same straightforvv-ard, direct manner, without any 
conscious effort at expression, and with the even tone and clarity of 
enunciation with which all folk-song collectors are familiar. Perhaps, 
however, they are less unselfconscious and sing rather more freely and 
with somewhat less restraint than the English peasant ; I certainly never 
saw any one of them close the eyes when he sang nor assume that rigid, 
passive expression to which collectors in England have so often called 
attention. 



X * Introduction 

They have one vocal peculiarity, however, which I have never 
noticed amongst English folk-singers, namely, the habit of dwelling 
arbitrarily upon certain notes of the melody, generally the weaker 
accents. This practice, which is almost universal, by disguising the 
rhythm and breaking up the monotonous regularity of the phrases, 
pi-oduces an effect of improvisation and freedom from rule which is very 
pleasing. The effect is most characteristic in f tunes, as, for example. 
No. 1 6 G, in which in the course of the tune pauses are made on each of 
the three notes of the subsidiary triplets. 

The wonderful charm, fascinating and w^ell-nigh magical, which the 
folk-singer produces upon those who are fortunate enough to hear him 
is to be attributed very largely to his method of singing, and this, it 
should be understood, is quite as traditional as the song itself. The 
genuine folk-singer is never conscious of his audience — indeed, as often 
as not, he has none — and he never, therefore, strives after effect, nor 
endeavours in this or in any other way to attract the attention, much 
less the admiration of his hearers. So far as I have been able to com- 
prehend his mental attitude, I gather that, w^hen singing a ballad, for 
instance, he is merely relating a story in a peculiarly effective way which 
he has learned from his elders, his conscious attention being wholly 
concentrated upon what he is singing and not upon the effect which he 
himself is producing. This is more true, perhaps, of the English than of 
the American singers, some of whom I found were able mentally to 
separate the tune from the text — which English singers can rarely do — 
and even in some cases to discuss the musical points of the former with 
considerable intelligence. 

I came across but one singer who sang to an instrumental accom- 
paniment, the guitar, and that was in Charlottesville, Va. (No. ii, B). 
Mrs. Campbell, however, tells me that in Kentucky, where I have not 
yet collected, singers occasionally play an instrument called the dulcimer, 
a shallow, wooden box, with four sound-holes, in shape somewhat like a 
flat, elongated violin, over which are strung three (sometimes four) 
metal strings, the two (or three) lower of which are tonic-drones, the 
melody being played upon the remaining and uppermost string which is 
fretted. As the strings are plucked with the fingers and not struck with 
a hammer, the instrument would, I suppose, be more correctly called a 
psaltery. 

The only instrumental music I heard were jig tunes played on the 
fiddle. I took down several of these from the two fiddlers, Mr. Reuben 
Hensley and Mr. Michael Wallin, who were good enough to play to me. 



Introduction ^ 

Whenever possible they used the open strings as drones, tuning the 
strings — which, by the way, were of metal — in a particular way for each 
air they were about to perform, I have not included any of these in this 
collection, but I hope, later on, to publish some of them when I have had 
further opportunities of examining this pecuhar and unusual method of 
performance. 

Many of the singers whose songs are recorded in the following pages 
had very large repertories. Mrs. Reuben Hensley, with the assistance 
of her husband and her daughter Emma, sang me thirty-five songs ; while 
Mrs. Sands of AUanstand gave me twenty-five; Mr. Jeff Stockton of 
Flag Pond, Tenn., seventeen; Mr. N. B. Chisholm of Woodridge, Va., 
twenty-four; Mrs. Tom Rice of Big Laurel, twenty-six; and Mrs. Jane 
Gentry of Hot Springs, no less than sixty-four. Attention has often 
been called to the wonderful and retentive memories of folk-singers in 
England, and I can vouch for it that these American singers are, in this 
respect, in no way inferior to their English contemporaries. 

None of the singers whom I visited possessed any printed song- 
sheets but some of them produced written copies, usually made by 
children, which they called "ballets", a term which the English singer 
reserves for the printed broadside. 

It will be seen that in many cases we give several variants or different 
versions of the same song and that we have made no attempt to dis- 
criminate between these. The fact that no two singers ever sing the 
same song in identically the same way is familiar to all collectors, and 
may be interpreted in either of two ways. The upholder of the individ- 
ualistic theory of origin contends that these variants are merely incorrect 
renderings of some original, individual composition which, never having 
been written down, has orally survived in various corrupt forms. On 
the other hand, there are those — and I count myself amongst them — who 
maintain that in these minute differences lie the germs of development; 
that the changes made by individual singers are akin to the "sports" 
in the flower or animal worlds, which, if perpetuated, lead to further ideal 
development and, perhaps, ultimately to the birth of new varieties and 
species. There is no doubt that if this problem is ever to be solved it 
will be through the examination and analysis of genuine, authentic 
variants, such as we have done our best faithfully to record; and we make 
no apology, therefore, for printing so many of them. 

For very much the same reason, in addition to the variants derived 
from different singers, we have in many cases recorded the changes 
made by the individual singer in the successive repetitions of the tune 



]di Introduction 

in the course of his song. These are often of great interest and signifi- 
cance and sometimes show an inventiveness on the part of the singer that 
is nothing less than amazing as, for example, in Mr. Jeff Stockton's 
version of "Fair Margaret" (No. 17, A). 

Mrs. Campbell and I have together collected 450 tunes. For the 
purposes of this volume, we have selected 325 of these, which are asso- 
ciated with 122 different sets of words — 55 ballads and 67 songs. 

The distinction between the ballad and the song is more or less 
arbitrary and is not easy to define with precision. Broadly speaking, 
however, the ballad is a narrative song, romantic in character and, above 
all, impersonal, that is to say, the singer is merely the narrator of events 
with which he personally has no connection and for which he has no 
responsibility. The song, on the other hand, is a far more emotional and 
passionate utterance and is usually the record of a personal experience 
■ — 'very frequently of an amatory nature. 

The Ballads. The ballads have, probably, the longer history behind 
them; at any rate, they attracted the attention of collectors earlier than 
the songs — the reason, perhaps, why the ballads have suffered, far more 
than the songs, from the unscrupulous editing of literary meddlers. 

The ballad air is necessarily of a straightforward type, as it is sung 
indifferently to verses often varying very widely in emotional character. 
Nevertheless, many of the ballad tunes are very lovely, as the musician 
who studies the contents of this volume will readily perceive. Such airs, 
for instance, as Nos. 3, 15, 19, 20, 27, 29, 35, 37, 39 and 47 make really 
beautiful music and are fully capable of standing alone, divorced from 
their texts, and of being played or sung as absolute music. The most 
perfect type of ballad, however, is that in which the tune, whilst serving 
its purpose as an ideal vehicle for the words, is of comparatively little 
value when divorced from its text. "The False Knight upon the Road" 
(No. i) is a good instance of this and, in my opinion, a splendid example 
of the genuine ballad at its highest pitch. 

It is greatly to be deplored that the literature of the ballad has, in 
the past, attracted so much more attention than the music. Properly 
speaking, the two elements should never be dissociated; the music and 
the text are one and indivisible, and to sever one from the other is to 
remove the gem from its setting. Early poetry, to which category the 
traditional ballad belongs, was always sung or chanted ; it was addressed 
to the ear, not the eye. While language appeals primarily to the intelli- 



Introduction xiil 

gence, its sound acts upon and arouses the emotions, the more especially 
when the words have been artfully chosen, thrown into metrical rhythm 
and wedded to beautiful music. Of all human creations, language is 
perhaps the most distinctive and characteristic; its development has 
proceeded step by step with the progress of mankind from the savage to 
the cultivated being of the present day ; and in the course of this evolution 
the ballad has played by no means an insignificant part. 

The texts of the first thirty-seven ballads in this book are all recorded, 
most of them in various forms, in the late Professor Child's English ajid 
Scottish Ballads. The remaining eighteen ballads were either deliber- 
ately excluded by Child from his collection — no doubt for some very good 
reason — or were unknown to him. 

The references in the Notes at the end of this volume show which of 
these ballads have already been found and published in England. Most 
of these English references, however, are to versions recorded many years 
ago, when collectors were content with a lower standard of accuracy, 
and cannot, therefore, be regarded as trustworthy as similar transcrip- 
tions of a later date. It will be noticed that twelve of the "Child" 
ballads, Nos. i, 5, 7, 8, li, 14, 15, 20, 25, 30, 31 and 35, have not been 
recorded in the Journal of the English Folk-Song Society, nor in any of 
the recent standard publications. I regret that I am unable to give 
similar statistical information with respect to American records, but, 
unfortunately, I am not sufficiently acquainted with the nature of the 
discoveries that have been made, many of which are not yet accessible 
in printed form. I believe, however, that Nos. 25, 30 and 31 have not 
previously been found in any form in America, and that of the remaining 
thirty-four the texts, but not the tunes, have in most cases been alone 
recorded. 

The Songs. The song-melodies differ in many respects from those 
of the ballads. Structurally, many of them are built upon larger and 
more elaborate lines, while emotionally, for reasons already given, they 
are far more intense and more heavily charged with sentiment. Several 
of the mountain song-tunes are, in my opinion, very characteristic and 
beautiful; Nos. 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 65, 69, 83, 88, 104 and 106, for instance, 
will challenge the very finest of the folk-tunes that have been found in 
England. Some of them, too, while conforming in type to the regular 
English folk-tune are yet in a measure so different that they may fairly 
be considered a fresh contribution to the subject. 

Some of the song-texts are quite new to me and are not to be found, 



xiv Introduction 

so far as I have been able to discover, in any of the standard English 
collections, e.g., Nos. 57, 59, 63, 65, 68, 70, 79, 81, 86, 88, 91, 122 and 123. 
The literature of the traditional song does not, as a whole, compare 
favourably with that of the ballad. Many of the lines printed in this 
volume are corrupt and unintelligible, while some of them are the merest 
doggerel. Nevertheless, a few of the verses are very beautiful, not merely 
by contrast but intrinsically. Stanzas, for example, such as 

When I see your babe a-laughing, 
It makes me think of your sweet face ; 
But when I see your babe a-crying, 
It makes me think of my disgrace. 

and 

When your heart was mine, true love, 

And your head lay on my breast, 

You could make me believe by the falling of your arm 

That the sun rose up in the West. 

There's many a girl can go all round about 
And hear the small birds sing, 
And many a girl that stays at home alone 
And rocks the cradle and spins. 

There's many a star that shall jingle in the West, 
There's many a leaf below, 

There's many a damn that will light upon a man 
For treating a poor girl so. 

contain all the essentials of genuine poetry and, in their feeling, in their 
artlessness, in the directness and simplicity of their verbal expression and 
the absence of circumlocution, reach a high level of imaginative and 
poetic expression. 

One curious hiatus in the repertories of the mountain-singers struck 
me very forcibly, viz. the total absence of songs of a ritual nature, e.g. 
Harvest-Home songs, Carols (with one notable exception, No. 13), 
May-day songs and others of religious origin, such as those associated 
with the Morris and Sword-dance ceremonies; as well as, for obvious 
reasons, all Cuckoo*, Primrose and other Spring songs. The reason for 
this, I take it, is because ritual observances belong to, and are bound up so 
closely with, the soil of a country that they do not readily survive trans- 
plantation; and partly, too, because the mountain people for the most 
part live in isolated dwellings and at considerable distances from one 
another and do not congregate in villages as in older and more settled 

* This statement must now (i. e. May, 19 17) be modified, for I have just noted down in 
Knox Co., Ky., a version of "The Cuckoo is a fine bird," a remarkable example, in the 
circumstances, of the persistence of tradition. 



Introduction xv 

countries like England, a condition that would inevitably lead to the 
discontinuance of seasonal and other communal festivals. This latter 
reason may also account for the decadence of dancing amongst the 
mountaineers, although I have no doubt that religious scruples have 
also been a contributory cause — I noticed that in reply to my enquiries 
on this subject the euphemism "playing games" was always substituted 
for "dancing" by my informants. 

Scales and Modes. Very nearly all these Appalachian tunes are 
cast in "gapped" scales, that is to say, scales containing only five, or 
sometimes six, notes to the octave, instead of the seven with which we 
are familiar, a "hiatus", or "gap", occurring where a note is omitted. 

To trace the history of this particular scale is to venture upon 
controversial ground. Personally, I believe that it was the first form of 
scale evolved by the folk which was in any way comparable with our 
modem major or minor scale. Originally, as may be gathered from the 
music of primitive tribes, the singer was content to chant his song in 
monotone, varied by occasional excursions to the sounds immediately 
above or below his single tone, or by a leap to the fourth below. Even- 
tually, however, he succeeded in covering the whole octave, but, even so, 
he was satisfied with fewer intermediate sounds than the seven which 
comprise the modern diatonic scale. Indeed, there are many nations at 
the present day which have not yet advanced beyond the two-gapped or 
pentatonic scale, such as, for instance, the Gaels of Highland Scotland; 
and, when we realize the almost infinite melodic possibilities of the 5- 
note scale, as exemplified in Celtic folk-music and, for that matter, in the 
tunes printed in this volume, we can readily understand that singers felt 
no urgent necessity to increase the number of notes in the octave. A 
further development in this direction was, however, eventually achieved 
by the folk-singer, though, for a long while, as was but natural, the 
two medial notes, required to complete the scale, were introduced 
speculatively and with hesitation. There are many instances in Irish 
folk-music, for example, in which the pitch or intonation of these added 
sounds is varied in the course of one and the same tune. This experi- 
mental and transitional period, however, eventually came to a close and the 
final stage was reached, so far as the folk-singer was concerned, when 
the diatonic scale, i.e. the 7-note scale represented by the white notes of 
the pianoforte, became definitely settled. And this is the scale which is 
commonly used by the English folk-singer of the present day. But even 
then, and for a long period after, the mediate sounds remained " weak " 



xvi Introduction 

and were employed only as auxiliary notes or connecting links, rather 
than structural or cadential notes, so that the gaps, though covered up, 
were not concealed. And it was left to the art-musician to take the final 
step and evolve the 7-note scale of which every note could be used with 
equal freedom and certainty. 

Of the tunes in this volume, some are pentatonic; others belong to 
the transitional period and are hesitatingly hexatonic, or even heptatonic; 
while a few are frankly in the major mode, i.e. diatonic 7-note tunes in 
which no indication of a pentatonic origin can be traced. For the benefit 
of those interested in this technical question, particulars concerning scale 
and mode are given at the head of every tune in the text. The names 
and characteristics of the 7-note diatonic modes need no explanation; 
but with regard to the pentatonic modes, which are but rarely employed 
by art-musicians, it may be as well, perhaps, to explain the method of 
classification and nomenclature adopted in this volume. This is set out 
in the chart on the opposite page. 

The five pentatonic modes there given have been derived in the 
following way : — 

If from the white-note scale of the pianoforte the two notes E and 
B be eliminated we have the pentatonic scale with its two gaps in every 
octave, between D and F and between A and C. As each one of the five 
notes of the system may in turn be chosen as tonic, five modes emerge, 
based, respectively, upon the notes C, D, F, G and A. The gaps, of course, 
occur at different intervals in each scale and it is this distinguishing feature 
which gives to each mode its individuality and peculiar characteristic. 

The one-gapped or hexatonic scale, and the 7-note or heptatonic 
scale are, as we have already seen, derivates of the original pentatonic, 
obtained by the filling in, respectively, of one or both of the gaps. Miss 
Gilchrist (see Journal of the Folk-Song Society, v., pp. 150-153), whose 
very clear exposition of this matter I am in the main following, allows 
the lower gap, i.e. between D and F, to be completed by the insertion of 
either E-flat or E-natural, and the upper gap, i.e. between A and C, by 
the addition of B-flat ; and by this method she has succeeded in classifying 
very satisfactorily her material, which consists entirely of Gaelic tunes. 
When, however, I came to apply this method to the mountain- tunes I 
found it necessary to make the following modification, viz., to take E- 
natural as the constant and invariable mediate note of the lower gap, and 
either B-flat or B-natural of the upper. The chart, given here, has, 
therefore, been constructed on this plan, i.e. Miss Gilchrist's, modified 
in the way just explained. 



Pentatonic Modes 



Pentatonic. 



a 



Mode I Mode 2 

No 3rd. No 7th. No 2nd. No 6th. 



W= 



-z; «?- 



^ 



Hexatonic. 



No 7th. 



No 6th. 



-0-^^ 



-fS> ^- 



-a ^- 



-G f^- 



No 3rd. 



-25 •— 

No 2nd. 



I 



Hexatonic. 
b. 



vm-. 



-^ a.- 



-^ £2- 



%• ^ 



I 



Heptatonic. ^ 

a + b. - 



-^ £2_2? 



2? • 



-& ^ 



^|i 



-25 ^- 



lonian with Bjlj. Mixolydian with Bf?. Dorian with BjlJ ; Aeolian with Bt>. 



Pentatonic. 



Hexatonic. 



Mode 3 

No 4th. No 7th. 



Mode 4 

No 3rd. No 6th. 



-^ 22_ 



-^ a-^ 



No 4th. 



-z? <9- 



-m-^ 



No 3rd. 



g ^* ^ 



-fS- <=z- 



I 



Hexatonic. 
b. 



-g? ^- 



=11- 



No 7th. 



No 6th. 

-& «2_ 



-z? 'f^ — -- 



Heptatonic. 

a + b. 



( 


) 




























(^ 








, , 






tf 












,,^ 


# 




1 








> bH« 












^- b 


la 


/■^ 








1 




\ 














_^. 


Z5 f 


r 










i 


VS' 


2 s:ii 




' 
























1 



































Lydian with Bij; Ionian with Bb. Mixolydian with Bjj; Dorian with B[>. 

Mode 5 



Pentatonic. 



No 2nd. No ah. 
L^ a- 



I 





No 2nd. 






(O' 


-iS'- 






V 


^ 


« «? 






II 




/ ^ 










II 


a. 


l?'^ ^ 










II 




VV ; . , 11 


















Hexatonic. 
b. 




-^|»— ^- 



No 5th. 



Heptatonic. 
a + b. 



-z? — ^- 



-fiJ «2- 



I 



Aeolian with BJj ; Phrj'gian with B[?. 



xviii Introduction 

This description will, it is hoped, enable the reader to understand 
the modal and scale index attached to each of the tunes printed in this 
volume. His attention, however, must still be called to two points. 

In some tunes it has been difficult to decide with certainty upon the 
tonic, for in pentatonic airs, or, at any rate, in these mountain melodies, 
the tonic is frequently and patently not the final note of the tune. Airs 
of this kind are called "circular, " because the final phrase is fashioned so 
that it may lead into the initial phrase without pause or break of con- 
tinuity and thus complete the melodic circle. Strictly speaking, the 
singer on the final repetition of a circular tune should vary the last 
phrase so as to conclude upon the tonic ; but this singers very rarely do — • 
No. 25 is the only tune in this Collection in which this is done. 

Again, it will be seen that a heptatonic tune may, so far as its notes 
are concerned, be assigned indifferently to one or other of two modes. 
An Ionian air, for instance, may belong to Mode I, or Mode 3 ; a dorian to 
Modes 2 or 4, and so forth. The true classification in such cases is 
determined by detecting the "weak" notes, which, by disclosing the 
places in the scale where the gaps originally occurred, will thereby show 
the mode, of which the tune in question is a derivative. An Ionian tune, 
for example, will be assigned to Mode i if its third be a weak note (as 
well as its seventh) , and to Mode 2 if, instead of the third, the fourth be 
the weak one. Similarly a dorian air will be classified second or fourth 
Mode according as the second or third scale-degree be the weak note. 

Ethnological Origin of the Singers. If the prevalence of the gapped 
scale in the mountain tunes is any indication of the ethnological origin of 
the singers, it seems to point to the North of England, or to the Lowlands, 
rather than the Highlands, of Scotland, as the country from which they 
originally migrated. For the Appalachian tunes, notwithstanding their 
"gapped" characteristics, have far more affinity with the normal English 
folk-tune than with that of the Gaelic-speaking Highlander (cf. Journal 
of the Folk- Song Society, v., pp. 157-269), and may, therefore, very well 
have been derived from those who, dwelling on the borders of the High- 
land Kingdom, had become infected to some extent with the musical 
proclivities of their neighbours. It will be observed, moreover, that the 
Notes contain a large number of references to Dean Christie's Traditional 
Ballad Airs and to the late Gavin Greig's Folk-Songs of the North-East, 
and both of these are collections of traditional songs from Lowland, not 
Highland, Scotland. 

There is, however, another possible explanation. For all that we 



Introduction xix 

know — and there is really no trustworthy evidence on this point — the 
English folk-singer of the eighteenth century may still have been using 
the gapped scale and may not have advanced to the understanding and 
use of the 7-note scale until the following century. And if this supposi- 
tion be made — -and it is at least a possible one — we may argue that the 
ancestors of our mountain singers hailed originally from England and 
that they sang in the gapped scale because that was the habit which 
then prevailed amongst their contemporaries. An analysis of the names 
of the singers recorded in this volume does not help us very much, but, 
so far as it goes, it seems to support rather than to contradict this latter 
supposition. 

However, it is not a matter of any great importance which of these 
two hypotheses w^e accept, because, in either event, the tunes in question 
would quite correctly be called English. For, as folk-lorists will, I think, 
agree, England and the English-speaking parts of Scotland must, so far 
as folk-tales, folk-songs and other folk-products are concerned, be re- 
garded as one homogeneous area. 

The Cultural Significance of Tradition. The words and the tunes 
in this Collection are typical and authentic examples of the beginnings 
and foundations of English literature and music. The history of man 
is the history of his efforts to express himself, and the degree to which 
he has at any given moment succeeded in doing this is the measure of 
the civilization to which he has attained. The method by which he 
has sought to achieve this end has been through the exercise and 
development of certain inborn and basic human faculties; and his 
achievements are concretely to be seen in the literature, music, paint- 
ing, dancing, sculpture and other art - works which each nation 
has created and accumulated and in which it finds reflected its own 
peculiar and distinctive characteristics. The process is a cumulative 
one, the children of each generation receiving from their fathers that 
which, with certain modifications and additions of their own, they be- 
queath to their children. The historian, however, will point out that 
this process is not uniformly progressive; that nations m the course of 
their development pass through different phases, and that, in consonance 
with these, their artistic output varies in character and quality from 
period to period. These variations, however, fluctuate within certain 
clearly defined limits, and are superficial rather than radical; so that, 
while each may reflect with greater or less fidelity the specific outlook of a 
particular epoch, the form of expression remains fundamentally true to 



XX Introduction 

one type, and that the national type. And this national type is always 
to be found in its purest, as well as in its most stable and permanent form, 
in the folk-arts of a nation. 

Although this theory of nationalism in art is now very generally 
accepted, the fact that it is based upon the intimate relationship which 
the art of the folk must always bear to that of the self-conscious, culti- 
vated and trained individual artist is too often overlooked. But, bearing 
this in mind, the significance and value of the contents of such a book 
as this become immediately apparent. We talk glibly of the creative 
musician, but, however clever and inspired he may be, he cannot, magi- 
cian-like, produce music out of nothing; and if he were to make the 
attempt he would only put himself back into the position of the primi- 
tive savage. AU that he can do and, as a matter of fact, does, is 
to make use of the material bequeathed to him by his predeces- 
sors, fashion it anew and in such manner that he can through it, 
and by means of it, express himself. It is my sober belief that if 
a young composer were to master the contents of this book, study 
and assimilate each tune with its variants, he would acquire just the 
kind of education that he needs, and one far better suited to his 
requirements than he would obtain from the ordinary Conservatoire 
or College of Music. 

Again, the value of such songs as these as material for the general 
education of the young cannot be overestimated. For, if education is to 
be cultural and not merely utilitarian, if its aim is to produce men and 
women capable, not only of earning a living, but of holding a dignified 
and worthy position upon an equality with the most cultivated of their 
geneiation, it will be necessary to pay at least as much attention to the 
training and development of the emotional, spiritual and imaginative 
faculties as to those of the intellect. And this, of course, can be achieved 
only by the early cultivation of some form of artistic expression, such as 
singing, which, for reasons already given, seems of all the arts to be the 
most natural and the most suitable one for the young. Moreover, 
remembering that 'the primary purpose of education is to place the 
children of the present generation in possession of the cultural achieve- 
ments of the past so that they may as quickly as possible enter into their 
racial inheritance, what better form of music or of literature can we 
give them than the folk-songs and folk-ballads of the race to which 
they belong, or of the nation whose language they speak? To deny 
them these is to cut them off from the past and to rob them of that 
which is theirs by right of birth. To put it another wa}'-, the aim of the 



Introduction xxi 

educationist should be not to forge the first link of a new chain, but to 
add a fresh link to an old one. 

' That culture is primarily a matter of inheritance and not of educa- 
tion is, perhaps, a mere truism, but it is one, nevertheless, which educa- 
tionists often forget. My knowledge of American life may be too slender 
for an opinion of mine to carry much weight, but I cannot withhold the 
criticism — -advanced with the greatest diffidence — that the educational 
authorities of some of the larger cities in the United States are too ready 
to ignore the educational and cultural value of that national heritage which 
every immigrant brings with him to his new home, and to rest too con- 
fidently upon their educational system, which is often almost wholly 
utilitarian and vocational, to create the ideal American citizen. I admit 
that the problem which faces the educationist in America is a peculiarly 
difficult one, but it will, I am convinced, never be satisfactorily solved 
until the education given to every foreign colonist is directly based upon, 
and closely related to, his or her national inheritance of culture. 

Of the supreme cultural value of an inherited tradition, even when 
unenforced by any formal school education, our mountain community in 
the Southern Highlands is an outstanding example. Another, though 
negative, instance of the truth of the same principle may be seen in the 
contents of a book which Professor Lomax has recently compiled, con- 
cerning the songs of the cowboys of Texas.' Let me ask the reader to 
compare these with the songs of the Southern Highlanders. The com- 
parison is a fair one, for the cowboys live a communal life almost as 
isolated and shut ofE from the world as that of the mountaineers, and 
feel, accordingly, the same compelling desire to express themselves in 
song. They are not, or at any rate they would not, I imagine, consider 
themselves, in any way inferior to their neighbours ; they are, I take it, 
less illiterate, while the life they lead is more vivid and exciting and far 
richer in incident. Why, then, is it that their songs compare so un- 
favourably with those of the mountain singeis? It can only be because 
the cowboy has been despoiled of his inheritance of traditional song; he 
has nothing behind him. When, therefore, he feels the need of self- 
expression, having no inherited fund of poetic literature upon which to 
draw, no imaginative world into which to escape, he has only himself and 
his daily occupations to sing about, and that in a self-centred, self- 
conscious way, e.g., "The cowboy's life is a dreadful life"; "I'm a poor 
lonesome cowboy"; "I'm a lonely bull-whacker" — and so forth. 

Now this, of course, is precisely what the folk-singer never does. 

' Cowboy Songs and other Frontier Ballads. Sturgis and Walton, 1916. 



xxii Introduction 

When he sings his aim is to forget himself and everything that reminds 
him of his everyday life ; and so it is that he has come to create an imagin- 
ary world of his own and to people it with characters quite as wonderful, 
in their way, as the elfish creations of Spenser. 

Mrs. Campbell and I realize that we are, of course, only at the 
beginning of our labours and that the contents of this book are but a 
first instalment. Indeed, when we consider into what a very small 
portion of the field we have as yet carried our investigations the magni- 
tude of the task before us seems overwhelming. But this may not in 
reality be so, for it may not, after all, be necessary to pursue our researches 
throughout the whole of the area with the same care that we have already 
given, say, to the Laurel Country. For folk-singing in the mountains is 
so live an art and so general a practice that in all probability by the time 
we have collected a certain number of songs — -not necessarily a very 
great number— we shall find that jve have exhausted the field. Whether 
or not this comforting supposition proves to be correct, we shall, neither 
of us, rest content until all of this material has been collected, either by 
ourselves or by others, published, and made generally available. 

We have in the following pages printed the songs exactly as we took 
them down from the lips of the singers, without any editing or "adorn- 
ments" whatsoever, and we have done so because we are convinced that 
this is the only way in which work of this kind should be presented, at 
any rate in the first instance. Later on, we may harmonize and publish 
a certain number of the songs and so make a wider and more popular 
appeal. 

But this can be done at leisure. The pressing need of the moment 
is to complete our collection while there is yet the opportunity — and who 
can say how long the present ideal conditions will remain unaltered? 
Already the forests are attracting the attention of the commercial world ; 
lumber companies are being formed to cut down and carry off the timber, 
and it is not difficult to foresee the inevitable effect which this will have 
upon the simple. Arcadian life of the mountains. And then, too, there 
are the schools, which, whatever may be said in their favour, will always 
be the sworn enemies of the folk-song collector. 

I cannot allow myself to conclude these remarks without expressing 
my gratitude to the many friends who have assisted me in my investiga- 
tions. There are those in particular, who were kind enough to entertain 
me in their mountain homes: — Dr. and Mrs. Packard of White Rock; 
Miss Edith Fish of AUanstand; Mrs. Hamilton and Miss Bacon of AUe- 



Introduction xxiii 

ghany; Miss OUie Henricks of Big Laurel; and Miss Jennie Moor of 
Rocky Fork. Nor can I omit the names of some, at least, of those by 
whose help and advice I have so greatly profited: — Mrs. J. J. Storrow, 
who gave me assistance of a most practical kind; Professor Alphonso 
Smith, and Mr. John M. Glenn of the Russell Sage Foundation. 



C. J. S. 



27 Church Row, 
Hampstead, 

London, N. W. 



CONTENTS 













PAGE 


Introduction 


vi 


Ballads : 




I. 


The False Knight Upon the Road . . . i 


2. 


Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight . 






3 


3- 


Earl Brand 






9 


4- 


The Two Sisters . 








16 


5- 


The Cruel Brother 








20 


6. 


Lord Randal 








22 


7- 


Edward .... 








26 


8. 


Sir Lionel 








28 


9- 


The Cruel Mother 








29 


10. 


The Three Ravens 








32 


II. 


The Two Brothers 








33 


12. 


Young Beichan 








38 


13- 










43 


14. 


Fair Annie 








45 


15- 


Young HuNTmo 








47 


16. 


Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 






55 


17- 


Fair Margaret and Sweet William 






62 


18. 


Lord Lovel 






71 


19. 


The Wife of Usher's Well . 






73 


20. 


Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 






78 


21. 


Barbara Allen .... 






90 


22. 


Giles Collins. .... 






100 


23- 


Lamkin ...... 






104 


24. 


The Maid Freed from the Gallows 






106 


25- 


JoHNiE Scot 






109 


26. 


Sir Hugh ..... 






III 


27. 


The Gypsy Laddie .... 






112 


28. 


Geordie 






. 117 


29. 


The Daemon Lover 






119 


30. 


The Grey Cock .... 






. 128 


31- 


The Suffolk Miracle 






. 130 


32. 


Our Goodman 


. 






. 134 



XXVI 



Contents 



Ballads — Continued 

33. The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin 



34- 
35. 
36. 
37- 
38. 
39- 
40. 
41. 
42. 

43- 
44. 

45- 
46. 

47- 
48. 
49. 
50. 

51- 
52- 
53- 
54- 

55- 



The Farmer's Curst Wife 

The Golden Vanity 

The Brown Girl . 

The Trooper and the Maid 

In Seaport Town . 

The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 

Shooting of His Dear . 

The Lady and the Dragoon 

The Boatsman and the Chest 

The Holly Twig . 

Polly Oliver , 

The Rich Old Lady 

Edwin in the Lowlands Low 

Awake! Awake 

The Green Bed 

The Simple Ploughboy 

The Three Butchers 

William Taylor 

The Golden Glove 

Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth 

The Silk Merchant's Daughter 

Jack Went A-Sailing 



Songs : 



56. The Rejected Lover 

57. The Lover's Lament 

58. The Dear Companion 

59. The Rocky Mountain Top 
60.' The Warfare is Raging 

61. The True Lover's Farewell 

62. Katie Morey . 

63. Rain and Snow 

64. The Wagoner's Lad 

65. Come all you Fair and 

66. Ibby Damsel . 

67. Handsome Sally 

68. William and Polly 

69. Hick's Farewell . 

70. Poor Omie 

71. The Virginian Lover 

72. Early, Early in the Spring 

73. Married and Single Life 



Tender Ladies 





Contents 


xxvii 


Songs — Continued 


PAGE 


74- 


Betsy 


236 


75- 


If You Want to Go A-courting . . . . 


238 


76. 


Pretty Saro 


239 


77- 


My Dearest Dear ...... 


242 


78. 


I'm Going to Georgia 


243 


79. 


Harry Gray ........ 


244 


80. 


Locks and Bolts ....... 


245 


81. 


William and Nancy ...... 


248 


82. 


George Reilly 


249 


83- 


Johnny Doyle 


251 


84. 


Lazarus ........ 


253 


85. 


Black is the Colour ..... 


255 


86. 


The Single Girl ..... 


256 


87. 


John Hardy ....... 


257 


88. 


Betty Anne 


259 


89. 


My Boy Billy 


260 


90. 


Soldier, Won't You Marry me? . 


262 


91. 


SWANNANOA ToWN ...... 


263 


92. 


The Keys of Heaven 


264 


93- 


Putman's Hill 


268 


94. 


The False Young Man .... 


269 


95- 


Pretty Peggy 


274 


96. 


My Parents Treated Me Tenderly ' . 


276 


97. 


The Sheffield Apprentice .... 


278 


98. 


The Broken Token 


. 281 


99. 


Wild Bill Jones ...... 


. 284 


100. 


The Shoemaker 


. 285 


lOI. 


The Brisk Young Lover .... 


. 286 


102. 


Seven Long Years ..... 


. 288 


103. 


Come All You Young and Handsome Giels . 


. 289 


104. 


Loving Reilly ...... 


. 290 


105. 


The Awful Wedding 


292 


106. 


Sweet William ...... 


• 293 


107. 


Good Morning, My Pretty Little Miss 


296 


108. 


My Mother Bid Me 


. 298 


109. 


The Ten Commandments . . . " . 


. 300 


no. 


The Tree in the Wood .... 


. 302 


Nursery Songs: 




III. 


The Farmyard . . . . " . 


. 307 


112. 


The Drummer and His Wife 


. 308 


113- 


The Bird Song 


. 310 


114. 


SouRwooD Mountain 


. 312 



xxviii 


Contents 










NtfRSERY Songs — Continued page 


115- 


The Foolish Boy 313 


ii6. 


Harm Link .... 








314 


117. 


Sing Said the Mother . 








315 


118. 


I Whipped My Horse 








316 


119. 


A Frog He Went A-courting 








317 


120. 


The Frog in the Well . 








319 


121. 


The Carrion Crow 








320 


122. 


The Old Grey Mare 








321 


Notes 


. 








323 


Bibliography 










337 


Index 


.000 








339 



BALLADS 



No. I 



The False Knight Upon the Road 

A 

Sung by Mrs. T. G. Coaxes 
Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 1916 



%^^i 



h N - 



itniMz 



fi=fe3^ 



i 



=J: 



■* — ^ 



-^^— S-^ 



^-•— ^^# 



I. The knight met a 



child in the road. 



O . 



. where are you 



*?l 



-• 4 4 



go - ing to? said the knight in the road. I'm 






go - mg 



Ui 



^=^ 



• i ^ 



-^=i=A^i 



-N— 1 



El, 



fc=t=5F=t= 



to my school, said the child as he stood. He stood and he stood and it's 




P^ 



-A — h^ 



:*=t 



155= 



^=i 






3t=i: 



=^ 



:I^:^ 



^— • 



::^ 






well be-cause he stood. I'm a - go-ing to my school,said the child as he stood. 



2 O what are you going there for ? 
For to learn the Word of God. 

3 O what have you got there ? 

I have got my bread and cheese. 

4 O won't you give me some ? 
No, ne'er a bite nor crumb. 

5 I wish you was on the sands. 

Yes, and a good staff in my hands. 

6 I wish you was in the sea. 

Yes, and a good boat under me. 

7 I think I hear a bell. 

Yes, and it's ringing you to hell. 



^ii 



The False Knight Upon the Road 
B 

Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
Pentatonic. Mode 3, b (no 6th). at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 

^- 



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t^ 



4=i: 



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^ 



I. Where are you go - ing? Says the knight in the road. I'm 



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go- ing to my school, said the child as he stood. He stood and he stood, He 



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well thought on he stood. I'm a - go -ing to my school, said the child as he stood. 



2 What are you eating ? 

I'm a-eating bread and cheese. 

3 I wish'd you was in the sea. 
A good boat under me. 

4 I wish'd you was in the well. 
And you that deep in hell. 



No. 2 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a 




(a) 



Sung by Miss Elizabeth Coit 
at Amherst, Mass., July, 1916 



ft- -fe— ^C 



^ 



A fs N 1^ 



mi 



-ll — ^- 



iti^ 



I. O bring down some of your fa- ther's gold And more of your moth-er's mon - 



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S 



j^— -N-::i 



-& — ^- 



3=* 



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ey, . . And two of the best hors - es in your fa - ther's sta - ble That 

(a) 



il »- 



i^S^d^ 



m^ 




dai - ly are thir - ty - three. 



2 She brought down some of her father's gold 
And more of her mother's money, 

And two of the best horses in her father's stable 
That daily are thirty-three. 

3 He rode on the milk-white steed 
And she rode on the bay. 

And together they came to the North of Scotland 
Three hours before it was day. 

4 Light down, light down, my pretty colleen, 
I've something here to tell thee. 
Six^kings' daughters lie drowned here 
And thou the seventh shall be. 

5 O turn your back to the billowy waves. 
Your face to the leaves of the tree. 
For it ill beseems an outlandish knight 
Should view a stark lady. 

6 He turned his back to the billowy waves, 
His face to the leaves of the tree, 

When quickly she threw both her arms round his neck 
And tossed him into the sea. 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 

7 Lie there, lie there, thou false young man, 
Lie there instead of me. 

You promised to take me to the North of Scotland, 
And there you would marry me. 

8 O give me hold of your little finger 
And hold of your lily-white hand. 

And I'll make you the ruler of all my estates 
And the ruler of all my land. 

9 No, I won't give you hold of my little finger. 
Nor hold of my lily-white hand, 

And I won't be the mistress of all your estates 
And the ruler of all your land. 

10 She rode on the milk-white steed, 
And by her went the bay, 

And together they came to her father's castle 
Three hours before it was day. 

11 'Twas then the pretty parrot spoke 
From his cage upon the wall : 

O what is the matter, my pretty colleen, 
Why did you not answer my call ? 

12 O hush, O hush, my pretty parrot, 
Don't tell any tales upon me, 

And your cage shall be of the beaten gold 
And your perch of the almond tree. 

13 'Twas then her father spoke 
From the chamber where he lay : 

O what is the matter, my pretty parrot, 
That you're calling so long before day ? 

14 O these rats, these rats are at my cage door; 
They're trying to take me away, 

So I am just calling my pretty colleen 
To drive these rats away. 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 




B 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 2, igif 



P 



£^EE 



d3 



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:i 



r- 



1. Get down, get down, get down, says he, Pull off that fine silk 

4 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 






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gown ; For it is too fine and cost - ly To rot in the salt - wa - ter 



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sea, 



(«) 



sea, 



sea, To 



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rot in the salt - wa - ter 



2 Turn yourself all round and about 
With your face turned toward the sea. 
And she picked him up so manfully 
And over'd him into the sea. 

3 Pray help me out, pray help me out, 
Pray help me out, says he, 

And I'll take you to the old Scotland 
And there I will marry thee. 

4 Lie there, you false-hearted knight. 
Lie there instead of me. 

For you stripped me as naked as ever I was born, 
But I'll take nothing from thee. 

5 She jumped upon the milk-white steed 
And she led the dapple grey, 

And she rode back to her father's dwelling 
Three long hours before day. 



m 



Pentatonlc. Mode i. 

N- 



Sung by Mrs. Bishop, Clay Co., Ky., 
on July 1 6, 1909 



B=t: 



m 



3t=* 






I. Pull off that silk, my pret - ty Pol - ly, Pull off that silk, said 



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JtizMz 



he, 



For It 



too fine 

s 



and too cost 



ly 



To 



i 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 

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'9~ i*~ 

rot in the bri - ny, bri - ny sea, To rot in the bri - ny sea. . 

2 Turn your back, sweet Willie, said she, 
O turn your back unto me. 

For you are too bad a rebel 
For a naked woman to see. 

3 She picked him up in her arms so strong 
And she threw him into the sea. 

Saying : If you have drowned six kings' daughters here, 
You may lay here in the room of me. 

4 Stretch out your hand, O pretty Polly, 
Stretch out your hand for me. 



And help me out of the sea. . . 

5 She picked up a rock and threw on him, saying ; 
Lay there, lay there, you dirty, dirty dog. 

Lay there in the room of me. 
You're none too good nor too costly 
To rot in the briny, briny sea. 

6 Hush up, hush up, my pretty parrot, 
Hush up, hush up, said she. 

You shall have a golden cage with an ivory lid 
Hung in the willow tree. 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b. 



Sung by Mrs. Moore, 
Rabun Gap, Georgia. May i, 1910 



:i=P= 



±E^ 



-^ • 



^ 



:^ 



2: 



i 



I. There was a pro - per tall young man, And 

_ 3 



Wil - liam was his 



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name; He came a - way o - ver the ra - ging sea, He 



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5 



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came a - court - ing me, O me. He came a - court - ing me. 

6 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 

2 He followed me up, he followed me down, 
He followed me in my room. 

I had no wings for to fly away, 
No tongue to say him nay. 

3 He took part of my father's gold, 
Half of my mother's fee ; 

He took two of my father's stable steeds, 
For there stood thirty and three. 

4 The lady rode the milk-white steed. 
The gentleman rode the grey. 

They rode all down by the north green land 
All on one summer's day. 

5 Light off, light off, my pretty fair miss, 
I tell you now my mind. 

Six pretty fair maids I've drownded here, 
The seventh one you shall be. 

6 Hush up, hush up, you old vilyun. 
That hain't what you promised me. 

You promised to marry me over the raging sea. 
And then for to marry me. 

7 Turn your back and trim those nettles 
That grow so near the brim ; 
They'll tangle in my golden hair 
And tear my lily-white skin. 

8 He turned his back to trim those nettles 
That growed so near the brim ; 

This young lady with her skilfulness 
She tripped her false love in. 

9 Lie there, lie there, you old vilyun, 
Lie there in the place for me. 

You have nothing so fine nor costly 
But to rot in the salt water sea. 

[Q First she rode the milk-white steed 
And then she rode the grey. 
She returned back to her father's house 
Three long hours before it was day. 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 
E 

Sung by Mrs. Nancy E. Shelton 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 



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--P-- 



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i 



I. She mount -ed on the milk-white steed And led the dap -pie 

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grey, And when she got to her fa - ther's house It was 



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one long hour till day, till day, It was one long hour till day. 



No. 3 

Earl Brand 
A 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Polly Shelton 
at White Rock, N. C, July 28, 1916 




O rise you up, ye sev'n breth-e-rens, And bring your sis - ter down ; It 




nev-er shall be said that a stew-ard's son Had ta - ken her out of town. 




^ ^ 0- — LI 




2 I thank you kindly, sir, he says, 
I am no steward's son. 

My father is of a regis king. 
My mother's a quaker's queen. 

3 He mound ( mounted ) her on a milk-white steed, 
He rode a dapple grey. 

He swung a bugle horn all round about his neck 
And so went blowing away. 

4 He had not gone three mile out of town 
Till he looked back again, 

And saw her father and seven bretherens 
Come trippling over the plain. 

5 Sit you down, fair Ellender, he said, 
And hold this steed by the rein. 
Till I play awhile with your father 
And your seven bretherens. 

6 Fair Ellender she sat still. 
It wasn't long till she saw 
Her own dear seven bretherens 
All wallowing in their blood. 



Earl Brand 

7 Fair Ellender she sat still, 
She never changed a note 

Till she saw her own father's head 
Come tumbling by her foot. 

8 Saying : Love runs free in every vein, 
But father you have no more, 

If you're not satisfied with this, 

I wish you were in some mother's chamber 

And me in some house or room. 

9 If I was in my mother's chamber 
You'd be welcome there. 

I'll wind you east, I'll wind you west, 
I'll wind along with you. 
ID He mound her on a milk-white steed. 
He rode the dapple grey. 

He swung a bugle horn all round about his neck 
And so went bleeding away. 

11 As he rode up to his father's gate 
He tingled at the ring, 

Saying : O dear father, asleep or awake, 
Arise and let me in. 

12 O sister, sister, make my bed. 
My wounds are very sore. 

Saying : O dear mother, O bind up my head, 
For me you'll bind no more. 

13 It was about three hours till day. 
The cock began to crow. 

From every wound that he received 
His heart blood began to flow. 
.4 Sweet William he died like it might be to-day. 
Fair Ellender tomorrow. 

Sweet William he died for the wounds he received, 
Fair Ellen died for sorrow. 

15 Fair Ellender was buried by the church door, 
Sweet William was buried by her ; 

And out of her breast sprung a blood red rose 
And out of his a briar. 

16 They growed, they growed to the top of the church 
Till they could grow no higher. 

And there they tied a true love's knot 
And the rose ran round the briar. 
10 



Earl Brand 
B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



(^0 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. i, 1916 



n 



:± 



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4: 



-E 



I. He rode up to her fa - ther's gate, So bold - ly he did say: You may 



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11 



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:^z=?=^: 



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keep your old - est daugh-ter at home, For the young-est I'll take a - way. 




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ib) 



(^■) 



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feS^E3^ 



B=t*=ti=* 



1^^] 



The pause-notes were sung as minims. 



2 He jumped upon the milk-white steed 
And she rode the dapple grey, 

And he hung a bugle horn all about his neck 
And so went sounding away. 

3 He had not got but a mile or two 
Till he looked back over the main, 

And he saw her father and her seven brothers all 
Come trippling over the lane. 

4 Get down, get down, get down, says he, 
And hold this steed by the mane. 

Till I play awhile with your father, he says, 
Yes, and your seven brethren. 

5 She got down and never spoke. 
Nor never cheaped 

Till she saw her own father's head 
Come trinkling by her feet. 

6 Hold your hand, sweet William, she says, 
Pray hold your hand for sure. 

For love runs free in every vein, 
But father I'll have no more. 



11 



Earl Brand 

7 If you hain't pleased at this, he says, 
If you hain't pleased, says he, 

I'll wished you was at home in your mother's chambery 
And me in some house or room. 

8 Go wind you east, go wind you west, 
I will go along with you. 

And he hung a bugle all round about his neck, 
And so went bleeding away. 

9 But when he got to his mother's hall, 
He jingled at the ring ; 

O dear mother, sleep or awake, 
Rise and let me in. 

10 Sister, sister make my bed, 
My wounds are very sore. 

O dear mother, bind my head. 
You'll never bind it more. 

11 It was about three hours before day, 
The chickens began to crow. 

And every breath that he did draw 
His heart's blood begin to flow. 

12 Sweet William died of the wounds he got 
And Barbary died for sorrow. 

And the old woman died for the love of them both 
And was buried on Easter Monday. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 

(?) 



a^ 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 

at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



(t>r- 



£ 



± 



1. He rode up 



to the old man's gate, 



So 



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bold - ly he did say, Say-ing: 

(0 



Keep your young - est 



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m 



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daugh - ter at home, For the 



old 



est I'll take a 



way. 



12 



Earl Brand 




-4=^^:i 



^ r — ^ — • — ^ — '<&- — j -j Verses 5 and 6 



<0 



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I 



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2 He holp her on his milk-white steed, 
And he rode the apple grey. 

He swung a bugle horn all round about her neck 
And so went winding away. 

3 He hadn't got more than a mile out of town, 
Till he looked back again. 

He. saw her own dear seven brothersen 
Come trippling over the plain. 

4 Set you down, fair Ellinor, he said, 
And hold the steed by the rein, 

Till I play awhile with your own dear father 
And yovir seven brothersen. 

5 Fair Ellinor she sat still 
And never changed a word, 

Till she saw her own dear seven brothersen 
All wallowing in their blood. 

6 Fair Ellinor she sat still 
And never changed a note. 

Till she saw her own dear father's head 
Come tumbling by her feet. 

7 He holp her on her milk-white steed 
And he rode the apple grey. 

Till he swung a bugle horn all around her neck 
And so went winding away. 

8 He rode up to his mother's gate 
And tingled on the ring. 

Saying: O dear mother, asleep or awake, 
Arise and let me in. 

9 Sister, sister, fix my bed, 
My wounds are very sore. 

Saying: O dear mother, bind up my head, 
For me you'll bind no more. 

13 



Earl Brand 

10 Sweet William he died from the wounds received, 
Fair Ellinor died with sorrow ; 

Sweet William died with the wounds received 
And Ellinor died with sorrow. 

1 1 Sweet William was buried at the upper church yard 
And Ellinor was buried close by. 

Out of William's grave spring a blood red rose 
And out of hers a briar. 

12 They grew, they grew to the top of the church 
Where could not grow any higher. 

They wound, they tied in a true love knot, 
The rose wrapped round the briar. 



Penatonic. Mode 3. 






D 



-^=^i 



Sung by Mrs. Moore, 
Rabun Co., Georgia, in May, 1909 



m- 



■2i 



^ 



b^2 



-A- 



^ 



I. He rode up to the old man's gate, So bold-ly he did say: You can 



m 



W- 



^^ 



=t 



^ 



keep your young est daugh-ter at home. But your old -est I'll take a - way. 



2 O rise you up, you seven brothers all. 
And bring your sister down. 

It never can be said that a steward's son 
Shall take her out of town. 

3 I thank you, kind sir, said he, 
I am no stewerd's son ; 

My father's of the richest of kings 
And my mother's a Quaker's queen. 

4 She lit on the milk-white steed, 
And he rode on the brown. 

5 Then they rode about three miles from town, 
And then he cast his eyes all around, 

And saw her father and seven brothers all 
Come trickling down the plain. 

14 



Earl Brand 

6 O, light you off, fair Ellen, said he, 
And hold my steed by the rein, 
Till I play awhile with your father 
And seven brothers all. 

7 Fair Ellen she still stood there 
And never changed a word 

Till she saw her own dear seven brothers all 
A-wallowing in their own blood. 

8 Fair Ellen she still stood there 
And never changed a note, 

Till she saw her own dear father's head 
Come tumbling by her foot. 

9 O hold your hand, sweet William, said she. 
Love runs free in every vein, 

But father I have no more. 

If you are not satisfied with this 

I wish you were in your mother's chamberee 

And I'se in some house or room. 

10 If I was in my mother's chamberee, 
You'd be welcome there. 

I'll wind you East, I'll wind you West, 
I'll trip along with thee. 

1 1 He rode up to his mother's gate 
And jangled at the ring : 

O mother, dear mother, asleep or awake. 
Arise and let me in. 

12 O sister, O sister, make my bed, 
For my wound is very sore. 

O mother, O mother, bind up my head, 
For me you'll bind no more. 

13 It was about three hours till day. 
And the chickens crowing for day, 

When every wound sweet William received. 
The blood began to pour. 

14 Sweet William he died like it was to-day, 
Fair Ellender tomorrow ; 

Sweet William died from the wounds he received. 
Fair Ellender died cf sorrow. 



15 



No. 4 

The Two Sisters 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



i 



^■ 



4Ei 



--^- 



-d — d- 



-■^^ 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept, 11, 1916 
{a) 






:± 



-t 



I. O . . sis-ter, O sis -ter, come go with me, Go with me down to the sea. 



^^^^^Ei^^3=^ 



Ju - ry flow-er gent the rose-ber - ry, The j u - ry hangs o - ver the rose-ber - ry. 




^^^0 



We'll take it and we'll make harp strings. 
We'll take them and we'll make harp screws. 



2 She picked her up all in her strong arms 
And threwed her sister into the sea. 

3 O sister, O sister, give me your glove. 
And you may have my own true love. 

4 O sister, O sister, I'll not give you my glove, 
And I will have your own true love. 

5 O sister, O sister, give me your hand. 
And you may have my house and land. 

6 O sister, O sister, I'll not give you my hand, 
And I will have your house and land. 

7 O the farmer's wife was sitting on a rock, 
Tying and a-sewing of a black silk knot. 

8 O farmer, O farmer, run here and see 
What's this a-floating here by me. 

9 It's no fish and it's no swan. 

For the water's drowned a gay lady. 

10 The farmer run with his great hook 
And hooked this fair lady out of the sea. 

1 1 O what will we do with her fingers so small ? 
We'll take them and we'll make harp screws. 

16 



The Two Sisters 

1 2 O what will we do with her hair so long ? 
We'll take it and we'll make harp strings, 

13 O the farmer was hung by the gallows so high, 
And the sister was burned by the stake close by. 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b ( dorian ). 



B 

Sung by Mr. Wesley Batten at Mount Fair, 
Albermarle County, Va., Sept. 22, 1916 



1^ 



:^ 






i 



--=^- 



-Is— 



I. There lived an old la - dy in the north country, Bow down, There 



tt2=: 



-^ — ^ — ^ — n- 



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3 



t-- 



=^=^ 



lived an old la - dy in the north country, The bough has been to me, There 



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lived an old la- dy in the north coun-try, She has daugh • tcrs 



i 



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3^^ 



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^^m 



■^- 



-2^- 



one, two, three. True to my love, love my love be true to me. 

•These B's and F's were ordinarily sung as written ; but the singer occasionally sharpened them, making the B's 
natural and the F's sharp. 

2 There came a young man a-courting there. 
And he made the choice of the youngest there. 

3 He made her a present of a beaver's hat, 
The oldest thought a heap of that. 

4 O sister, O sister, just walk out 

To see those vessels a-sailing about. 

5 The oldest pushed the youngest in. 
She did struggle and she did swim. 

6 O sister, O sister, give me your hand. 
And I will give you my house and land. 

7 I will not give you my hand, 

But I will marry that young man. 

8 The miller picked up his drab hook. 
And then he fished her out of the brook. 



17 



The Two Sisters 

9 The miller got her golden ring, 
The miller pushed her back again. 

lo The miller was hung at his mill gate 
For drownding my poor sister Kate. 



Heptatonic. Major Mode. 



Sung by Miss Louisa Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



g 



& 



m 



^ 



:^: 



:tc=: 



I. There lived an old lord by the north - ern sea, Bow down, There 



i 



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S 



lived an old lord by the north - ern sea, The boughs they bent to me. . There 



J M i^ 



P P m 



1 1^^ 



i 



lived an old lord by the north - ern sea. And he had daugh-ters one, two, three. 

1= 



w=^=±^ 



f-^-^ 



^ 



w^ 



8: 



it 



That will be true, true to my love, Love and my love will be true to me. 

2 A young man came a-courting there, 
He took choice of the youngest there. 

3 He gave this girl a beaver hat, 

The oldest she thought much of that. 

4 O sister, O sister, let's we walk out 
To see the ships a-sailing about. 

5 As they walked down the salty brim, 
The oldest pushed the youngest in. 

6 O sister, O sister, lend me your hand. 
And I will give you my house and land. 

7 I'll neither lend you my hand or glove, 
But I will have your own true love. 

8 Down she sank and away she swam. 
And into the miller's fish pond she ran. 

9 The miller came out with his fish hook 
And fished the fair maid out of the brook. 

18 



The Two Sisters 

10 And it's off her finger took five gold rings, 
And into the brook he pushed her again. 

1 1 The miller was hung at his mill gate 
For drowning of my sister Kate. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
(mixolydian influence). 



D 



Sung by Mr. Nuel Walton 
at Mt. Fair, Va., Sept. 26, 1916 



yzit 



^ 



I. There was once an 



old 



dy in the north coun - try, The 



Ff*^ 


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^— Hv— ^— f-t r J J 7--^- 




7 J' '—i=^s. 


—j — j^-j^ -J — ; — J— -^ — d — ? — •— 



bough were giv - en to me. . There was once an old la - dy in the 



g 



II: 



^ 



north coun - try, The bough were giv - en 



to 



me, 



There was 



/ 


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— 







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•— * ' 



once an old la - dy in the north coun-try, And she had daugh-ters one,two and three. 




Lov-er be true, true to my lov - er love and my love be true to me. 



2 That young man bought a beaver hat, 
The oldest one thought hard of that. 



19 



No. 5 

The Cruel Brother 



a 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



l# 



^^ 



f-f-^^i=t 



W^i^r. 



*=jtL 



.fZ f2L. 



;2=it 



^^=3t 



I . There's three fair maids went out to play at ball, I - o the li - ly gay, There's 



^^ 



is N- 



itzzt 



r — *— ^ 



three land-lords come court them all, And the rose smells so sweet I know. 



2 The first landlord was dressed in blue. 

He asked his maid if she would be his true. 

3 The next landlord was dressed in green. 
He asked his maid if she'd be his queen. 

4 The next landlord was dressed in white. 
He asked his maid if she'd be his wife. 

5 It's you may ask my old father dear, 
And you may ask my mother too. 

6 It's I have asked your old father dear. 
And I have asked your mother too. 

7 Your sister Anne I've asked her not, 
Your brother John and I had forgot. 

8 Her old father dear was to lead her to the yard. 
Her mother too was to lead her to the step. 

9 Her brother John was to help her up. 
As he holp her up he stabbed her deep. 

10 Go ride me out on that green hill. 
And lay me down and let me bleed. 

1 1 Go haul me up on that green hill, 
And lay me down till I make my will. 

12 It's what will you will to your old father dear? 
This house and land that I have here. 

13 It's what will you will to your mother, too ? 
This bloody clothing that I have wear. 



20 



The Cruel Brother 

14 Go tell her to take them to yonders stream, 
For my heart's blood is in every seam. 

15 It's what will you will to your sister Anne ? 
My new gold ring and my silver fan. 

16 It's what will you will to your brother John's wife? 
In grief and sorrow the balance of her life. 

17 It's what will you will to your brother John's son? 
It's God for to bless and to make him a man. 

18 It's what will you will to your brother John ? 
A rope and a gallows for to hang him on. 



21 



No. 6 

Lord Randal 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Dora Shelton 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 2, 1916 



:|% 



i=i 



■-t^^ 



^m 



I. What you will to your fa-ther, Jim -my Ran-dolph my son? What you 



y 



m 



lf=T^ 



*=3t 



-^ — ^ 



• s 



will to your fa-ther, my old ■ est, dear-est one ? My horses, my bug-gies,Moth-er, 



P: 



<5' d—^ 



-i 



^ 



It: 



-<&- 



make my bed soon, For I am sick-heart - ed And I want to lie down. 



2 What you will to your brothers. 
My mules and waggons. 

3 What you will to your sisters. 
My gold and my silver. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 3, 191 6 



J 



m 



sB 



fe^^^ 



^^^^ 



• d 



I. What did you eat f or your sup-per, Jim - my Ran-dal my son ? What did you 



& 



m 



t=t 



^ 



eat for your sup - per, my own dear-est one ? Cold poi-son, cold poul-try. Moth-er 



tm 



i 



S 



--A — 4- 



I 



ibe±i=il 



-fi"— 



make my bed soon, For I am sick - heart - ed and I want to lie down. 



2 What will you will to your mother. 
My gold and my silver. 

3 What will you will to your father 
My mules and my wagons. 

22 



Lord Randal 

4 What will you will to. your sister. . . , , 
My land and my houses. 

5 What will you will to your brothers. ... 
My trunks and my clothing. 

6 What will you will to your sweetheart 

Two tushes bulrushes and them both parched brown, 
For she is the cause of my lying down. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Miss Emma Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 



-tt 



m 



\—0 ^z:zi « • — L — 



4: 



I. It's what did you eat for your break-fast, Jim - my Ran-dal my 



-iJ: 



fi 



i 



:^= 



:p=» 



-<&— — ^- — ^» • • — I • • — ^- ii«i,^|— "-^^ • *- 

son? It's what did you eat for your break-fast, My own dear - est 



A-tt ttiL 


/TN 






(«) 


/T\ 










j/' w'r 


• 





s 




/^ 5 v 


P a a 1 


1* 


^ 


> 


) 1 1 


I{^ ■" 


r 1 1 




1 1 


LM ^ — _J 


L-l U ^ -^ 


:_j — ' 


1- 


# 





• 


•—-J 



son ? It's cold pie and cold cof - fee. Moth - er, make my bed 



:il 



^=1^ 



3 



5 



I 



soon, For I'm sick at the heart and I want to lie down 
{a) 






^ 



3 



-^-p^i- 



PT 



^ 



(Mrs. Hensley's version) 



M 



2 It's what will you will to your father . 
My mules and my wagons. 

3 It's what will you will to your mother 
My trunk and my clothing. 

4 It's what will you will to your brother 
My house and plantation. 

5 It's what will you will to your sister . 
My gold and my silver. 

23 



Lord Randal 

6 It's what will you will to your sweetheart . . . 
Bulrushes, bulrushes, and them half parched brown, 
For she's the whole cause of my lying down. 

7 Where do you want to be buried .... 
By my little baby. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



(^) 



Sung by Mr. William F. Wells 
at Swannanoah, N. C, Sept. 9, 1916 



iS: 



:fc:=t 



t4: 



1. Where have you been a 



4r-d- 



4=t 



rov - ing, Jim - my 



Ran - dal 



my 



^^ 



i 



-<5>- 

son ? Where have you been a - rov - ing, my old - est 



dear 



lf=^- 



-^ 



one? I've been out 



court - ing, moth - er, make my bed 



3^^ 



;i 



:± 



soon, I'm sick to the heart and I want to lie 



down. 



S 



(a) (Last Verse) 



What is your rea- son, Jim -my 



(^) 






2 What did you will to your mother 
My houses and my lands. 

3 What did you will to your father , 
My waggon and my team. 

4 What did you will to your brother 
My horn and my hounds. 

5 What did you will to your sister . 
My rings off my finger. 



24 



Lord Randal 

6 What did you will to your sweetheart 
A cup of strong poison. 

7 What is your reason . 
Because she poisoned me. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Miss Florence McKinney 
at Habersham Co., Georgia, June 2, 1910 



^ 



i—g- 



t^ 



=± 



^ 



I. O where have you been, Lord Ran - dal my son.? O where have you 



r=r=^ 



4: 



ii: 



^=t=t 



'Sl~ 



^^^ 



been, my 



on - ly son? I've been a - court - ing, moth - er, O 



-^=± 



st 



P 



-(2- 



-^ 



make my bed soon, For I'm sick at the heart And fain would he down. 

2 What did you have for your supper. . . '. 
A cup of cold poison. 

3 What would you leave your father 

My wagon and oxen. 

4 What would you leave your mother 
My coach and six horses. 

5 What would you leave your sweetheart 

Ten thousand weights of brimstone to burn her bones brown. 
For she was the cause of my lying down. 



25 



No. 7 

Edward 
A 

Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b (mixolydian ). at Hot Springs. N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 




-W-h 






-P-S= 



■^=^ 



I. Howcome that blood on your shirt sleeve? Pray, son, now tell to me. It . 



is the blood of the old grey - hound That run young fox for me. 

2 It is too pale for that old greyhound. 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 

It is the blood of the old grey mare 
That ploughed that corn for me. 

3 It is too pale for that old grey mare. 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 

It is the blood of my youngest brother 
That hoed that corn for me. 

4 What did you fall out about ? 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 
Because he cut yon holly bush 
Which might have made a tree. 

5 O what will you tell to your father dear 
When he comes home from town ? 

I'll set my foot in yonder ship 
And sail the ocean round. 

6 O what will you do with your sweet little wife ? 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 

I'll set her foot in yonder ship 
To keep me company. 

7 O what will you do with your three little babes ? 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 

I'll leave them here in the care of you 
For to keep you company. 

8 O what will you do with your house and land ? 
Pray, son, now tell to me. 

I'll leave it here in care of you 
For to set my children free. 

26 



Edward 
B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 



i 



:Sfi 



pafc^ 



I. O what will you say when your fa - ther comes back, 



O 




^^— ^- 



t=^ 



.tzzztz: 



-•— #^ 



what will you say to me? I'll set my foot on yon-der lit -tie boat, I'll 



i 



M 



s 



sail a - way o - ver the sea, I'll sail a - way o - ver the sea. 



27 



No. 8 

Sir Lionel 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



I^ 



:P^ 



'P=P= 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 16, 1916 



3^ 



t: 



:4=i: 



-t/ — t/- 



I. Ban - gry Rew - ey a - court - ing did ride, His sword and pis - tol 



Fj: 






:T 



:4=t 



by his side. Cam - bo key 



quid - die down, quill 



o - quon. 



(«) 



(^) 



^0 



2 Bangry rode to the wild boar's den 

And there spied the bones of a thousand men. 

3 Then Bangry drew his wooden knife 
To spear the wild boar of his life. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



B 



Sung by Mrs. Betty Smith and Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 1916 



i 



W^ 



I. There is a wild boar in these woods, Del- lum down, 



=t=^ 



del - lum down, There is a wild boar in these woods, He'll 



I 



g — ^- 

eat your meat and suck your blood. Del - lum down, del - lum down. 

2 Bangrum drew his wooden knife 

And swore he'd take the wild boar's life. 

3 The wild boar came in such a flash, 
He broke his way through oak and ash. 

28 



No. 9 

The Cruel Mother 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b (mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. lo, 1916 




I. She laid her ■ self all a-gainst the oak, All a -long in the Lude-ney 
Rather faster 




:± 



i^: 



'^ 



-P 



r- 



=t 



And first it bent and '^hen it broke, Down by the green-wood side, 

2 She leaned herself all against the thorn, 
And theie she had two fine babes born. 

3 She pulled out her snow-white breast, 

And she bid them a-suck for that would be the last. 

4 She pulled down her yellow hair, 

And she bound it around their little feet and hands. 

5 She pulled out her little penknife, 

And she pierced all in their tender little hearts. 

6 She was setting in her father's hall, 

And she saw her babes a-playing with their ball. 

7 O babes, O babes, if you were mine, 
I would dress you in the silk so fine. 

8 O mother, O mother, when we were thine, 

You neither dressed us in the coarse silk nor fine. 



I 



B 



Hexatonic. Minor mode 
( Aeolian influence, no 6th ) 



Sung by Mrs. MooRE 
at Rabun Co., Georgia, May i, 1909 



F#H-^^J 


— s — ^ — \ 

P — 1- — 1 


--2— i— 


N— r=J=P==_, 


— [-ri 


— ^-, 




— ^ — • — i^ \- 


-r--^- 


J ^ -•-=x=^^ 


— 4 (S-r- 


— • — 



E 



I. Christ-mas time is a roll-ing on, When the nights are long and cool, When 



n 



15: 



^* — ^ 



4-^^ 



-r 



:2z-. 



three little babes come run-ning down And run in their moth-er's room. 

29 



The Cruel Mother 

2 As she was going to her father's hall, 

All down by the greenwood side, 
She saw three little babes a-playing ball. 
All down by the greenwood side. 

3 One was Peter and the other was Paul, 

All down, etc. 
And the other was as naked as the hour it was born. 
All down, etc. 

4 O babes, O babes, if you were mine, 
I'd dress you in the silk so fine. 

5 O mother, O mother, when we were young, 
You neither dressed us coarse nor fine. 

6 You took your penknife out of your pocket. 
And you pierced it through our tender hearts. 

7 You wiped your penknife on your shoe, 

And the more you wiped it the bloodier it grew. 

8 You buried it under the marble stone. 
You buried it under the marble stone. 

9 The hell gates are open and you must go through, 
The hell gates are open and you must go through. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 
(a) 



Sung by Mr, T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 191 6 



tt 



=^^=P=^ 



^^^- 



^^ 



i -^ 



5 



:*■ 



frM 



I. O babes, O babes, if you was mine. All a -lone, a - lo - nay, I'd 



fi^^^ ^ r J ,^: ^^=T^j3 g|p^fl 



dress you up in silk so fine. All down by the green-wood side-y. 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode i, 
a -|- b (mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 1916 



-J-tA-n ^ ^ — ^ — i ^ ^-d i f 


^)^ I— i d i 1 d J ^ d 1 



I. O ba - by, O ba - by, if 

30 



you were mine, 



The Cruel Mother 



m 



lA 



i: 



(") 



St=^=t: 



i 



=&: 



El 



t 



# 



All a • long and a - lo - ney, I would dress you in the 



1=^ 



4= 



scar -let so fine Down by the green riv - er side 



M"" 



'Kfci 



jt=*: 



U 



i^^^^^^p 



Pentatonic. Mode 2 



:t5=^ 



Sung by Mr. RiLEY Shelton 
at Alleghany, N- C, Aug. 29, 1916 



(c) 



M 



3^ 



^^ 



^ 



-• ^ 



-75^- 



I. 

. ^'^^ 


dear moth-er when 


we was there, All a - long, a - long - ey. You'd 


"7ri7~F — 


f 1 1 


— 1 1 


" 1 T~J J — \ — \ — 


— \ \ — r 


ifh^ 1 


d \ 


m • ' 




1 


•-#— 1 1 


# 




-^ — ^ — 


# ■ V • # 


L J ,h-U 



neith - er dress us coarse nor fine. Down by the green-wood side 




31 



No. lo 

The Three Ravens 



Heptatonic. Mode i, 
a + b ( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr Ben Burgess 

at Charlottesville, Va., Sept. 28, 1916 



'?m 



::i=± 



m^#=^=i 



:j=4: 



• — r 



I. Three old crows sat on a tree, Just as black as crows could be. 



#1 



^ ^ 



^=^ 



-N— 



Poor old crow, 



The 



=F=t== 



^ • • 



ai 



^^3' 



t=t=^ 



:t=t: 



**?! 



old he - crow says to his mate : What shall we do for meat to eat ? 



:± 



=1= 



--^- 



SI 



^- 



4 •- 



• d 



tt 



Poor old crow. 



;i;i 



32 



No. 



The Two Brothers 
A 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Lizzie Roberts and Mrs. Smith 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 




=|: 



3^^ 



« ^ 



^ 



i 



I. Mon - day morn - ing go to school, Fri - day eve - ning home. 



I 



^ ^ • *=^ 



^ ^ 



-^ •- 



4 4 



4. 4- 



« 



Broth - er, comb my sweet-heart's hair As we go walk - ing home. 



-i- 



i4 4 - 



4 4 4 4 



:^= 



2 Brother, won't you play a game of ball ? 
Brother, won't you toss a stone ? 
Brother, won't you play no other game 
As we go marching home ? 

3 I can't play no game of ball, 
I can't toss no stone, 

I can't play no other game. 
Brother, leave me alone. 

4 Brother took out his little penknife, 
It was sharp and keen. 

He stuck it in his own brother's heart, 
It caused a deadly wound. 

5 Brother, take off your little check shirt. 
Stitched from gore to gore ; 

Bind it around the deadly wound. 
It won't bleed no more. 

6 Brother took off his little check shirt. 
Stitched from gore to gore ; 

Bound it around the deadly wound. 
It didn't bleed no more. 

7 Brother, O brother, go dig my grave, 
Dig it wide and deep. 

Bury my bible at my head. 
My hymn book at my feet. 

33 



The Two Brothers 

8 He buried his bible at his head, 
His hymn book at his feet, 
His bow and arrow by his side, 
And now he's fast asleep. 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b (ionian). 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Smith 
at Charlottesville, Va., Sept. 25, 1916 




fe^ 



:i 



:* 



:s;'— 5^ 



I. Two broth-ers they have just re-turned,Their pleasures are all sin -cere. I 






p 



=i=q=i 



iE^i^^S 




want to see my pret - ty Su - sie, The girl I loved so dear. 



J- 



i 



i^E 



i 



¥ 



2 You're not the one that loves Susie, 
And here I'll spill your blood. 

He drew a knife both keen and sharp 
And pierced it through his heart. 

3 What will you tell my father dear 
When he calls for his son John ? 

I'll tell him you're in the western woods 
A-learning your hounds to run. 

4 What will you tell my mother dear 
When she calls for her son John ? 
I'll tell her you're in the Tennessee 
A lesson there to learn. 

5 What will you tell my pretty Susie 
When she calls for true love John ? 
I'll tell her you're in your silent grave, 
Where never no more to return. 

6 She took her bible in her hand, 
A-moaning she went on. 

She moaned till she came to his silent grave. 
In search of her true love John. 

34 



The Two Brothers 

7 What do you want, my pretty Susie ? 
What do you want with me ? 

I want a kiss from your clay-cold lips, 
'Tis all I ask of thee. 

8 If I were to kiss your rosy cheeks 
My breath it is too strong. 

If I were to kiss your ruby lips, 
You would not stay here long. 

9 So now go home, my pretty Susie, 
And moan no more for me, 

For you may moan to Eternity, 
My face no more you'll see. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a -f b 
( mixolydian influence ). 



Sung by Mr. NUEL Walton 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 26th, 191 6 





I. One eve ■ ning, one eve - ning, Two broth -ers gone from school. The 



i^ 



:i 



3 



-zb- 



£ 



=t 



-z?- 



?' 



-Z5'-r-S^ 



old - est said to the young - est one : Let's take a wras - tie fall. 

(a) 



:i 



2 The oldest threw the youngest down, 
He threw him to the ground. 

And from his pocket came a penknife 
And give him a deathless wound. 

3 Pull off, pull off, your woolen shirt, 
And tear it from gore to gore, 

And wrap it around this deathless wound, 
And that will bleed no more. 

4 He pulled off his woolen shirt, 
And tore it from gore to gore, 

And wrapped it around this deathless wound, 
And it did bleed no more. 



35 



The Two Brothers 

5 It's take me up all on your back 
And carry me to yonder churchyard. 
And dig my grave both wide and deep 
And gentle lie me down. 

6 What will you tell your father 
When he calls for his son John ? 

You can tell him I'm in some low green woods 
A-leatning young hounds to run. 

7 What will you tell your mother 
When she calls for her son John ? 

You can tell her I'm in some graded school, 
Good scholar to never return, 

8 What will you tell your true love 
When she calls for her dear John ? 

You can tell her I'm in some lonesome grave, 
My books to carry home. 

9 One sweet kiss from your clay, clay lips 
Will bring my day short on. 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr. Ozzo Keeton 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 26th, 1916 




-2=*- 



=1: 



I. But when young Suse 



came to knew this 



She 



F^^ 



i==t 



-Zir 



charmed the birds all out of their nests. And charmed young John all 



n« 1 


, 


, 




















'■rrj+ II 1 


\ 1 


II 


/ "ft ' ! I 1 1 


III! 


1 1 1 


-^>JL^- 


w 


• 






1^ 


m 


1 


1 


j 


1 






"J • 


m 










^ 


J 1 


u 














* 






(2^ • 


a 



out of his grave. Where he was rest - ing in 



peace. 



2 O what do you want with me, young Suse, 

what do you want with me ? 

1 want one kiss from your sweet lips 
And then 1 can rest in peace. 



36 



The Two Brothers 
E 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 191 6 



ffi: 



Az 



:i 



=F= 



-^ 



--^-- 



-F 



:=t 



F^l 



I. It's Mon - day morn - ing go to school, Fri - day eve - ning home. 
(«) , , , , . 



ij: 



1^ ^ 



:3^E5 



F:#I 



Broth - er comb my sweet-heart's hair and wel - come her in home, 
(a) 



=t 



H 



=1=^ 



-)&~i- 



37 



No. 12 



Young Beichan 



Pentatonic. Mode i, a ( no 6th ). 



Sung by " Granny " Banks 
at White Rock, N. C, July 28, 1916 



m 



p2^ 



I. Lord Ba 



con was 



ble 



man, As 



F^ 



*i 



E 



E 



fine as a - ny you should see; He'd ga - thered all his 



i 



% 



£ 



• U 'J 



silks and ru bias, The Turk - ish land he'd go and see. 



2 He first blowed East and then blowed West, 
And he blowed down to the Turkish land. 
The Turks they got him and so sadly used him. 
To love his life he was quite wearied. 

3 They bored a hole in his left shoulder 
And nailed him down unto a tree. 

They gave him nothing but bread and water, 
And bread and water but once a day. 

4 The Turks they had but one fair daughter. 
As fair a one as you should see. 

She stole the keys of the prison strong 

{or, She stole the jail keep from her father) 
And vowed Lord Bacon she would set free. 

5 She said : Have you got any land or living, 
Or have you any dwelling free ? 

Would you give it all to a prince's daughter 
If she would set you free ? 

6 Then he says : I've got a land and living 
And I have got a dwelling free. 

And I'll give it all to you, (my)^pretty creature, 
If you will do that thing for me. 

7 She went on to her master's cellar 
And from her father stole a jail key. 

She opened the dungeon both deep and wide, 
And vowed Lord Bacon she would set free. 



38 



Young Beichan 

8 Then she look him to her master's {or father's) cellar 
And d rawed some of the best port wine, 

And drink a health, you pretty creature, 
1 wish. Lord Bacon, you were mine. 

9 And then they drawed each other's notes of love 
And seven years they were ^o stand. 

He vowed he'd marry no other woman 
Unless(^r Until) she married some other man, 

10 Then she took him on to the sea-side 
And left him sailing over the main : 
Fare-ye-well, fare-ye-well, you pretty creature. 
O when shall I see you again ? 

11 When seven years was passed and gone, 
And seven months and almost three, 
She gathered all her silks and rubies 
And vowed Lord Bacon she'd go and see. 

12 When she got to Lord Bacon's hall 
She knocked so far below the ring. 

Who's there, who's there {or O yes, O yes), said the bold, proud 

porter, 
Who knock so hard fain would come in ? 

13 Is this Lord Bacon's hall, she said, 
Or is there any man within ? 

O yes, O yes, said the bold, proud porter, 
This day has fetched him a young bride in. 



14 She says: Now you've married some other woman 
And I have married no other man, 

I wish I had my notes of love, 

Straight back I'd go to the Turkish land. 

15 She's got a ring on every finger 

And on her middle one she's got three, 
And gold around her neck a-plenty 
To buy all Cumberland of thee. 

16 Then up spoke the young bride's mother. 
An angry spoken old thing was she. 

Saying : Would you quit my own fair daughter 
And take up with a Turkish lady ? 



39 



Young Beichan 

17 He said : You may take your daughter home with you, 
Foi Tm sure she's none the worse of me, 

For the prettiest thing stands there awaiting 
That ever my two eyes did see. 

18 He took her by the lily-white hand 
And took her to her father's cellar, 
And drawed some of the best port wine, 
Saying : Drink a health, you pretty creature, 
Who freed me from such a prison strong. 

19 He took her by the lily white hand 
And gently led her to his hall. 

And changed her name from Pretty Nancy, 
And called her name, it was Noble Jane. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 

l2ar- ' ^ 



4: 



^S 



B 

Sung at Hindman School, Knott Co., Ky., 1907 

l5>- • • 



d: 



:2z£ 



:t=^±: 



I. There was a man wholivedin Eng-land And he was of somehighde 

-4 




-y-i/- 






s^fe^^s 



LlJtA: 



itat 



=1: 



1 



gree ; He became un - ea - sy, dis - con- tent- ed, Some fair land,some land to s«. 

2 He sailed East, he sailed West, 

He sailed all over the Turkish shore, 
Till he was caught and put in prison, 
Never to be released any more. 

3 The Turk he had but one lone daughter. 
She was of some high degree ; 

She stole the keys from her father's dwelling. 
And declared Lord Batesman she'd set free. 

4 She led him down to the lower cellar 

And drew him a drink of the strongest wine, 

Every moment seemed an hour. 

O Lord Batesman, if you were mine 1 

5 Let's make a vow, let's make a promise, 
Let's make a vow, let's make it stand ; 
You vow you'll marry no other woman, 
I'll vow I'll marry no other man. 



40 



Young Beichan 

6 They made a vow, they made a promise, 
They made a vow, they made it stand ; 
He vowed he'd marry no other woman, 
She vowed she'd marry no other man. 

7 Seven long years had rolled around, 
It seemed as if it were twenty-nine. 
She bundled up her finest clothing. 

And declared Lord Batesman she'd go find. 

8 She went till she came to the gate, she tingled, 
It was so loud, but she wouldn't come in, 

Is this your place, she cried. Lord Batesman, 

Or is it that you've let yours, brought your new bride in ? 

9 Go remember him of a piece of bread. 
Go remember him of a glass of wine, 
Go remember him of the Turkish lady 
Who freed him from the iron, cold bonds. 

10 He stamped his foot upon the floor, 
He burst the table in pieces three. 
Saying: I'll forsake both land and dwelling 
For the Turkish lady that set me free. 

1 1 She went till she came to the gate, she tingled, 
It was so loud, but she wouldn't come in, 
She's got more gold on her little finger 

Than your new bride and all your kin. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, 
a + b ( mixolydian ). 




Sung by Mrs. ZiPPO RiCE 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 15, 1916 



I. Lord Bates - man was 



no - ble - man, 



=1 ^ 

— i/ 

val - iant 




& 



-<S'-r- 



t- 



t 



sol - dier he set sail. He put his foot in - to some lit - tie 




I 



boat And de-clared some strange land he'd go and see. 

41 



Young Beichan 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 1916 



m 



^ 



I. They bored a 



hole 



in his left shoul - der And nailed him 



Pi 



■^ 



-S'-r- 



^TW^ 



=E^ 



P 



=F 



down 



to the wood, They give him noth - ing but bread and 



wa - ter, But bread and wa 



ter 



day. 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 



» 



e: 



-<5>-^ 



I. Lord Bates -man was a no - ble young man And as fair a 



P^S 



-# — »--t9 



^ 



-m — ^ ^ — — «?■ 



^a 



\¥==^=^ 



V 



as you'd wish to see, And he put his foot on a lit - tie 



# 



^ 



::!?: 



I 



m » • a • 

boat - en, And he vowed some strange land he would go and see. 



42 



No. 13 

The Cherry -Tree Carol 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 
(a) 




(b) 



Sung by Mrs. ToM Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, igi6 



^ 

^'^ 



— !i 1 — 



:f=^ 



=t== 



r- 



-«'-=- 



-y — u- 



I. As Jo - seph and Ma - ry were a - walk- ing the green, 




S ^ — ^-^ s •- 



They was ap - pies and cher - ries plen - ty there to be 



_ty^^g3 



I 



3^ 



-r^-t- 



==4= 



-^ — i 



-^ a^- 



seen. They was ap - pies and cher - ries plen - ty there to be seen. 



{a) 



ib) 



I 



2 And then Mary said to Joseph so meek and so mild : 
Gather me some cherries, Joseph, for I am with child. 

3 Then Joseph said to Mary so rough and unkind : 
Let the daddy of the baby get the cherries for thine. 

4 Then the baby spoke out of its mother's womb : 

Bow down you lofty cherry trees, let my mammy have some. 

5 Then the cherry tree bent and it bowed like a bow. 

So that Mary picked cherries from the uppermost bough. 

6 Then Joseph took Mary all on his left knee, 

Saying : Lord have mercy on me and what I have done. 

7 Then Joseph took Mary all on his right knee, 

Saying : O my little Saviour, when your birthday shall be, 
The hills and high mountains shall bow unto thee. 

8 Then the baby spoke out of its mother's womb : 

On old Christmas morning my birthday shall be {or, it'll be just 

before day), 
When the hills and high mountains shall bow unto me. 



43 



The Cherry-Tree Carol 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs, Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 






'SEd^E^ 



\-jk 



-^ 



^-- 



d: 



g! 



J.Jo - seph were a young man, 



4= 



S 



A young man were 



*^^ 



:::i= 



-iS'- 



he, And he court - ed Vir-gin Ma - ry, The Queen of Gal - li - lee. 




Ife^i^^^l 



Mary and Joseph 
Were a-walking one day. 
Here is apples and cherries 
A-plenty to behold. 

Mary spoke to Joseph 
So meek and so mild : 
Joseph, gather me some cherries, 
For I am with child. 

Joseph flew in angry, 

In angry he flew, 

Saying : Let the father of your baby 

Gather cherries for you. 

The Lord spoke down from Heaven, 
These words he did say : 
Bow you low down, you cherry tree, 
While Mary gathers some. 



6 The cherry tree bowed down, 
It was low on the ground ; 
And Mary gathered cherries 
While Joseph stood around. 

7 Then Joseph took Mary 
All on his right knee : 
Pray tell me, little baby. 
When your birthday shall be. 

8 On the fifth day of January 
My birthday shall be, 

When the stars and the elements 
Shall tremble with fear. 

9 Then Joseph took Mary 
All on his left knee, 

Saying : Lord have mercy upon me 
For what I have done. 



44 



No. 14 

Fair Annie 



Penta tonic. Mode 3 



Sung by Mrs Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24. 1916 



{a) 



I A 



ifc 



dieu, 



dieu, lair An - nie, he did say, For 



i 



m 



±: 



-4' 



:t: 



Jz 



£^t= 



=f= 



twelve months and one day. It's twelve months be roll - ing round, Fair 
^ (d) Ab) last verse 



55 



II 



-P--P= 



It: 



^- 



An- nie thought the time be-ing long. 



t 



home. And we'll have Lord Thomas burned. 

(.0 



E#3 






£ 



V- 



id: 



mi 



2 She took her spy glass in her hands 
And out of doors she went ; 

She looked to the East, West, both North and South, 
And looked all under the sun. 

3 She thought she saw Lord Thomas a-coming, 
All bringing his new briden home. 

She called her own seven sons : 
I think I see your father a-coming 
And bringing your step-mother home. 

4 Come down, come down, dear mother they did say, 
Some clothing to put on. 

Saying : All of his merry, merry, merry maids 
Might as well to come as one. 

5 Fair Annie she had a silken towel 
Hanging on a silver pin, 

And she wiped out her watery eyes 
As she walked out and in. 

6 The rest of them drunk ale, beer and wine. 
But fair Annie she drunk cold well water 
To keep her spirits alive. 



45 



Fair Annie 

7 There is a fair lady in our house, 
Before tomorrow morning she'll be dead, 
We will call to our waiting-maids 

And have her taken out of town. 

A word or two, Lord Thomas, she did say. 

Before I go away. 

8 I wish my sons was seven greyhounds 
And I was a fox on the hill, 

And they might have longer ( or more ) breath than I 
That they might worry me down. 

9 It's who is your father dear, 
And who is your mother. 
And who is your brother dear 
And who is your sister ? 

ID It's King Henry he's my father dear. 
Queen Chatry's my own mother, 
Quince Dudley he's my own brother dear 
And fair Annie she's my own sister. 

1 1 If King Henry he's your own father dear, 
Queen Chatry she's your own mother. 
Quince Dudley your brother dear, 

I'll ensure I'm your own sister. 

12 We have seven ships all on the sea, 
They're loaded to the brim. 

And five of them I'll give to you 

And two will carry me home, 

And we'll have Lord Thomas burned. 



46 



No. 15 



Young Hunting 



A 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 




:^==^ 



^- 



5 



I. Come in, come in, my pret - ty lit - tie boy. And stay this night with 



:^ 



me ; For I have got of the ve 



ry 



best And I will 



I 



5 



5 



give 



up 



to thee, I will give it up to thee. 



2 I can't come in, I won't come in 
And stay this night with thee. 
For I have a wife in old Scotchee 
This night a-looking for me. 

3 She did have a little penknife, 
It was both keen and sharp. 
She gave him a deathlike blow 
And pierced him through the heart. 

4 She picked him up all in her arms, 
Being very active and strong. 

And she throwed him into an old dry well 
About sixty feet. 

5 One day she was sitting in her father's parlour door, 
Thinking of no harm. 

She saw a bird and a pretty little bird 
All among the leaves so green. 

6 Come down, come down, my pretty little bird 
And parley on my knee. 

I'm afeard you'd rob me of my life 
Like you did the poor Scotchee. 

7 I wish I had my bow and arrow. 
My arrow and my string ; 

I'd shoot you through your tender little heart, 
For you never no more could sing. 

47 



Young Hunting 

8 I wish you had your bow and arrow, 
Your arrow and your string ; 
I'd fly away to the heavens so high, 
Where I could for evermore sing. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 
(a) 



Sung by Mr. Floyd Chandler 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 1916 



J — ^ — m- 



3^ 



fci£S* 



-^ ^ 



^— • 



-1=-- 



i 



I. Come in, come in, my own true love, And stay all night with 



^ 



^ 



:^ 



5^^ 



me. For I have a bed, and 

(0 



ve - ry fine bed, And I'll 



^3 



1 



rut 



give 
(a) 



up 



i 



to thee, And I'll give it up 






to 



^m 



thee. 

(0 



^ 



4=t 



2 It's I ain't coming in, nor I can't come in 
To stay all night with thee, 

For I have a wife in old Scotland 
And this night she weeps over me. 

3 It's out she drew her little penknife 
And stabbed him through his heart. 
She cried out with a very loud cry : 
There's a dead man in my house. 

4 It's she picked him up by the middle so small, 
She picked him up by his feet. 

She plunged him over in a deep, wide well 
Just about eighteen feet, feet, 
Just about eighteen feet. 

5 And as she was sitting in her parlour door 
Thinking of what she had done, 

She saw a bird and a very pretty bird 
All among the leaves so green, green. 

48 



Young Hunting 

6 Come here, come here, my pretty little bird 
And perch all on my thumb, 

For I have a cage and a very fine cage 
And I'll give it up to thee. 

7 It's I ain't a-coming there and I won't come there 
To perch all on your thumb, 

For I'm afraid you'll rob me of my tender little heart 
Just like a Scotland man, man. 

8 It's if I had my bow and arrow, 
My arrow and my bow, 

I'd shoot you right through the tender little heart 
Just like the Scotland man, man. 

9 It's if you had your bow and arrow, 
Your arrow and your bow, 

I'd fly away to the heavens above 
And ne'er be seen any more. 



Heptatonic. Major Mode 
( mixolydian influence ). 
(a) 






:i 



Sung by Miss Linnie Landers 
at Carmen, N. C, Sept. 5, 1916 



=¥=^ 



--^^- 



I. Come in, come in, my old true love, And stay all night with 

I I ^ -z z, D fT ^^l — ^ fv 



3E^5i 




'4^ 



For 



I have a bed and 



ve - ry fine bed, I'll 



Ei 



I 



give 



-iv 



it up 



f* 



g 



to thee, 
(a) 



thee, I'll give 



up 



to 



:± 



^fi*= 



;^0 



thee. 



2 I can't come in, nor I'm not coming in 
To stay all night w'ith thee, 
For I have a wife in the old Scotland, 
This night she waits for me. 

{^The re^naining stanzas as in B) 

49 



Young Hunting 



D 



Heptatonic. Major Mode 
( mixolydian influence ). 



Sung by Mrs. Orilla Kekton, 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 26, 1916 



^ 



■^ir-J d J 1 d 



^=^TP=P=P=li 



p — J— 4— 



m 



m. 



i 



ii—» 



-^- 



i^ 



•— # 



^ 



m 



I. As La-dy Mar-g'retwas a - go-ing to bed, She heard the sound of a 

ir— a a 1 \ r-1 : 1 1— ^ 1 (V 



lj? _i. U- 



X=t- 



33 



mu - si - cal horn, which made her heart feel glad and sad To 



^•—Pr-P: 



-A N- 



l^=i 



'-. — 9» — •— • — H 1 1 -I *— 1 ^ 



^ — ^ 



^ 



think that it was her broth - er John,broth-er John, Coming in from his wild 



ml 



^ ^=h=^i 



^ 



^ 



—li It 

hunt. But who should it be but her true love Hen - e - ry, Re 



^^^ 



m 



^ 



r^ 



S3E 



^ 



ii=zt 



turn - ing from his King, his King, Re - turn - Ing from his King. 
Subsequent verses sung thus : 






^?=^ 



E# 



4 ^ d • 



^^ 



^ —^—^ 



1?=^ 



S 



-<S>-v 



2 O light, O light, love Henery, 
And stay all night with me, 

And you shall have the cheers of the cheer {or cheery) cold girl, 
The best I can give you. 

3 I will not light and I shall not light 
To stay all night with thee, 

For there's a pretty girl in Merry Green Lea 
I love far better than thee. 

50 



Young Hunting 

4 He bended over her soft pillow 
And gave her a kiss so sweet, 

But with a penknife in her right hand, 
She wounded him in full deep. 

5 Woe be, woe be, Lady Marg'ret, he cried, 
Woe be, woe be to thee. 

For don't you see my own heart's blood 
Come twinkling down my knee ? 

6 She called unto a maid of hers : 
Keep a secret, keep a secret on me. 
All these fine robes on my body 
Shall always be to thee. 

7 One takened him by his long yellow hair 
And the other one by his feet. 

And they threw him into the well waters 
Which was so cool and deep. 

8 Lie there, lie there, love Henery, 
Till the flesh rots off your bones, 

And that pretty girl in Merry Green Lea 
Thinks long of your coming home. 

9 Up spoke, up spoke a pretty little parrot 
Exceeding on a willow tree : 

There never was a girl in Merry Green Lea 
He loved so well as thee. 

lo Come down, come down, my pretty little parrot, 
And sit upon my knee. 

And you shall have a cage of a pure, pure gold 
Instead of the willow tree. 

Ill won't come down, nor I shan't come down 
To sit upon your knee. 

For you have murdered your true love Henery, 
More sooner you would kill me. 

12 If I had my arrow in my hand, 
My bow on tuneful string, 

I'd shoot a dart that would win your heart, 
So you could no longer sing. 

13 If you had your arrow in your hand, 
Your bow on tuneful string, 

I'd take a flight and fly, fly away 
And tune my voice to sing. 
51 



Young Hunting 
E 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Sung by Mrs. Sotherland, 
at Carmen, N. C, on Oct. 3, 1914 






■& 



:f= 



■^ 



--^--^ 



^ 



W^ 



-J=±± 



Come in, come in, my own true 



S 



-^- 



d: 



:i 



love. And stay all night with 

-A N- 



m 






m 



me; And all those cost - ly cards that I wear a-round my waist I'll 



:# 



e 



I 



:^: 



:^ 



■Zhr- 



^ 



:2z 



« • — ' g j . 

free - ly give them un - to thee,thee,thee,ril free - ly give them un-to thee. 

2 I won't come in, or I won't sit down. 
Or stay all night with thee. 

For there is another pretty girl in old Scotland 
That I love more better than thee. 

3 She had a sharp knife within her right hand, 
She pierced him heartilee. 

4 I will come down and I must come down 
And stay all night with thee. 

There is nary nother pretty girl in old Scotland 
That I love more better than thee. 

5 O live. Lord Henry, she cried, 
One hour, or two, or three. 

And all these costly cards I wear around my waist 
I'll freely give them unto thee. 

6 I can't live, nor I won't live. 
One hour, nor two, nor three. 

And all the costly cards you wear around your waist 
Will do no good for me. 

7 She tuk him by his lily-white hand, 
She drug him to the well, 

Which you know was cold and deep. 
She says .... 

8 Lie there, love Henry, she cried. 

Till the flesh all rots off your poor bones 
And all your pretty girls in old Scotland 
Will mourn for your return. 
52 



Young Hunting 

9 Come down, come down, my pretty parrot bird, 
And sit at my right knee, 

And your cage shall be decked of the yellow beaten gold 
And hung on the ivory. 

lo I won't come down, nor I won't come down, 
Nor sit at your right knee. 

For you just now murdered your own true love, 
And soon you'd murder me. 

Ill wish I had in my bow in flight, 
My arrow keen and sharp, 
I'd pierce a lightning all through your breast 
That you never should sing again. 

1 2 If you had your bow in flight, 
Your arrow keen and sharp, 
My two little wings would carry me away, 
Where you never would see me again. 



Pentatonic. Mode i, a (no 5th). 




Sung by Mrs. Hall at Kensington, 
Walker Co., Georgia, April, 1914 



^ 



:4=f=h=zt: 



I. Come in. 



m, 



lov - ing Hen - ry, said she, And 



stay all night with me ; 



For it's been al - most one 



quar - ter of a year Since I spake one word un - to thee. 

2 I can't come in, Lady Margaret, said he, 
Nor stay all night with thee. 

For the girl that I left in the Arkansas land 
Will think long of my return. 

3 Then stooping over the great high fence 
And kissing all so sweet, 

She had a penknife in her hand 
And she plunged it into the deep. 
53 



Young Hunting 

4 Some taken him by his lily-white hands, 
Some taken him by his feet, 

And they carried him to the broad water side 
And plunged him into the deep. 

5 Lay there, lay there, loving Henry, said she, 
Till the meat drops off your bones. 

And the girl you left in the Arkansas land 
Will think long of your return, 

6 Come in, come in, pretty parrot, said she, 
And sing all on my knee ; 

Your cage shall be made of ivory beaten gold 
And the doors of ivory. 

7 I can't come in, Lady Margaret, said he. 
Nor sing all on your knee. 

For you are the girl that killed loving Henry, 
And surely you might kill me. 

8 I wish I had a bow and arrow. 
And it all in its prime, 

I'd shoot yon yonders pretty little bird 
That sits on that tall pine. 

9 Who cares I for your bow and arrow, 
And it all in its prime, 

I fly away to some lonesome valley 
And 'light on some high pine. 



54 



No. i6 
Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 




:^=t 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



^ 



^^ 



^3^± 



-7S>- 



^- 



1. Lord Thorn- as he was a brave young man, The keep-ing of bach-e-lor's 



^m^^s^m 



s 



V=^=^ 



4: 



A: 



I 



hall. Come rid-dle to me, my mo - ther dear, Come rid -die to me as one. 



ft 



^^ 



3 



B± 



I 



2 Or shall I marry fair Ellendry now, 
Or bring you the brown girl home ? 
Or shall I marry fair Ellendry now, 
Or bring the brown girl home ? 

3 The brown girl she has house and land, 
Fair Ellendry she has none. 

My request is to you, my son. 
Go bring the brown girl home. 

4 Fair Ellendry dressed herself in white, 
And trimmed her merry maidens green, 
And every town that she rode through 
They took her to be some queen. 

5 She rode up to Lord Thomas's hall. 
And tingled on the ring ; 

No^one so ordel but Lord Thomas himself 
For to rise and let her come in. 

6 He took her by the lily-white hand. 
He led her through the hall, 

He sat her down at the head of the table 
Amongst those ladies all. 

7 Is this your bride? — fair Ellendry she says — 
What makes her so wonderful brown? 

When you could have married as fair a lady one 
As ever the sun shined on. 

55 



Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 

8 Go hold your tongue, you pretty little miss, 
And tell no tales on me, 

For I love your little finger nail 
Better than her whole body. 

9 The brown girl had a little penknife 
Which just had lately been ground. 

She pierced it through fair Ellendry's side, 
The blood come tumbling down. 

10 He took her by her little hand, 
He led her in the room ; 

He took his sword and cut her head off 
And kicked it against the wall. 

11 He put the handle against the wall, 
The point against his breast. 

Here is the ending of three dear lovers. 
Pray take their souls to rest. 

1 2 Go dig my grave both wide and deep 
And paint my coffin black, 

And bury fair EUendry in my arms, 
The brown girl at my back. 

13 They dug his grave both wide and deep 
And painted his coffin black, 

And buried the brown girl in his arms 
And fair EUendry at his back. 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b ( Ionian ). 

=^ — N- 



Sung by Mrs. Moore 
at Rabun Co., Ga., May 2, 1909 



fi=:^ 



mz=^ 



^ p ^ -^p= 



- V— u ' ■ ' 



t=t=& 



=iP^ 



t^ 



i^:l 



I. O mo-ther, O mo - ther, go roll a song, Go roll a song as 



w 



1 — ^-ir-fj- 



ti — I 1—^ 



m 



1 — ^ 



8: 



:=tc 



one, . . Which had you ra - ther, I'd mar-ried fair El - len, Or 




bring the brown girl home, home? Or bring the brown girl home? 

56 



Lord Thomas and Fair EUinor 

2 It's, O my son, I'd advise you at your own blessing 
To bring the brown girl home ; 

For she has got both house and land 
And fair Ellender she has none. 

3 He dressed himself in the finest he had, 
His image it was broad ; 

And every town that he rode round 
They took him to be some lord. 

4 He rode up to fair Ellender's gate 
And jangled at the ring — 

No one so ready as fair Ellen herself 
To rise and let him come in. 

5 Lord Thomas, Lord Thomas, she replied, 
What news have you brought for me .'' 
I've come to ask you to my wedding, 
And that's bad news for to hear. 

6 O mother, O mother, go roll a song. 
Go roll a song as one. 

Which had you rather, I'd go to Lord Thomas' wedding, 
Or stay and tarry at home ? 

7 It's, O my daughter, I'd advise you at your own blessing 
To stay and tarry at home. 



8 I know I've got a-many- a friend. 
Likewise many a foe. 

But if my death coffin was at my door. 
To Lord Thomas' wedding I'd go. 

9 She dressed herself in the finest she had, 
Her image it was green ; 

And every town that she rode round 
They took her to be some queen. 

ID She rode up to Lord Thomas's gate 
And knocked so clear it rung. 
No one so ready as Lord Thomas hisself 
For to rise and let her come in. 

1 1 He took her by her lily-white hand 
And led her in the hall. 
And seated her down by his bright side 
Amongst the ladies all. 

57 



Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 

12 Lord Thomas, Lord Thomas, is this your bride ? 
I think she's very brown ; 

When you once might have had as fair a lady 
As ever the sun shined on. 

13 This brown girl she had a knife in her hand, 
And the blade both keen and sharp. 
'Twixt the long ribs and the short 

She pierced it through fair Ellender's heart. 

14 Fair Ellen, fair Ellen, he replied, 
What makes you look so pale ? 
Your cheeks were once the rosy red, 
And all your fine color has failed. 

15 Lord Thomas, Lord Thomas, she replied. 
Are you blind, or cannot you see ? 

Or don't you see my own heart's blood 
Come twinkling down so free ? 

16 Lord Thomas had a sword hung by his side 
With a blade both keen and sharp. 

He cut this brown girl's head smooth olT 
And cleaved the body apart. 

17 And then he pointed toward the floor 
With the point toward his heart. 

Did you ever see three own true loves 
Sudden in death to part ? 

18 Go dig my grave both wide and deep 
And paint my coffin black. 

And put fair Ellender in my arms 
And the brown girl at my back. 



Sung by Mrs. Roste Hensley 



Pentatonic. 


Mode 3. 

I 










at Carmen, N, C, Aug. 8, 1916 

! 




yi^K 




1 1 




1 


^ _ 


i 


/ '^ I 




A J 




1 ' 


• • ^ m T 


*+ 


((^ A 




J ^ s 




i 




^ 


II 


l\ 








J— 


-J— 




U_j i__J 


[!± 



=]^ 



Itit 



s 



-2=1- 



±P 



58 



Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mandy Shklton 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 



i 



=15: 



pS 



I. Lord Thorn - as 



he 



^- 



a brave young man, 
(a) ^ ,_2_3 



Jtzfz 



— N- 



s • r 



keep - ing of all king's hall ; Fair El - len - der 



^ 



t 



gay young la - dy, Lord Thorn - as he loved her dear. 

— aK-Tt • 1— i — I — 1 — I ^r-ff • i — I — H 



£ 



^i 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



S 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



S8 



^EJ 





I. Come well 


to 


me. 


dear moth 


er, 


he says. Come well me your 
{a) 


de - 




[y ' ■* 






- f 


f 






1 




^ 


1 L 






^ f 1 1 


J 1 


f(\\^ ~ ~ w 




J ' 


U* 






^ 


- / 


i , 




V 






L> '1/ ^' ^ 1 


«. 


J ' ' 


y 








V 







sign; 



Whe - ther 



I mar - ry fair 



El 



li - nor dear, Or 



i 



:i 



^H 



:^ 



^ 



=t 



W^ 



r- 



bring you the brown girl, home,home,home, Or bring you the brown girl home. 



X — V — ^ — ^ — IJ 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



F3& 



*«=#= 



iS: 



:1^ 



-M -^- 



Sung by Mrs. Addy Crane 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



:^= 



I. Lord Thom-as,Lord Thom-as, is this your bride ? I think she's mis - er - a - ble 

59 



Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 



^ 



^E^EEi 



^ 



brown ; And you could have mar - ried as fair a skinned girl As 



IS=^ 



N ^ N- 



I 



^#^ 



^ • wl- 



-• it- 



ev - er the sun shined on, shined on, As ev - er the sun shined on. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 

/7S 



feH3^ 



S 



Sung by Mrs. Noah Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 






i^^ 



f^ ^ 



E 



*=ii 






i 



l(^) 



iib). 



E# 



^ — ^ 



d—» 



l(0 



itzt 



H 



Hexatonic. Mode i, a. 









Sung by Mrs. Kate Campbell 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 1916 

{a) _ 



• ^ ^ 



-V b^- 



V V- 



V — ^ 



=p=p= 



:t=tn 



?^=P"- 



I. O moth-er, O moth-er, O mother, says he, Pray tell your wil - ling mind. 




J—m—m— 



i 



=ff=?E 



■•— • i » 1 F— • h- ^ 1 1— r 



S==F 



_^_L 



t±tZZ3tZZt 



Wheth-er I must mar - ry fair El - Hng - ton. Or bring the brown girl home. 






w 



i 



60 



Lord Thomas and Fair EUinor 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at AUanstand, N. C, Aug. 5, 191 6 



-^ 1 



g=£ 



-d- 
[. I'll 



rid - die 



to 



you, 



my youn 



£ 



d • 



:J^3: 



-d—9-^. 



ger son, 

3^ 



And ad 



--=\-- 



vise you all as one . The brown girl she's got house and home, Fair 



=t 



=i=i 



d=^= 



;«_u: 



:f^ 



El - lin - der she's got none. Fair El - len - der she's got none. 

J 

Sung by Miss Della Moore 
Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. at Rabun Co., Ga. 



Q, n T T K^T T [V- 




p-^ -j— 


^ , 1 


toS=5i^E^SiEj!=^=iJ=(:f_ 


? U- 

— b* d— 


—V— '^ — \t — * — 


— •— -4—-d — ^— 








- — ' -«- 



O mo-ther, O mother, go roll a song, go roll a song as one. Which 



=^^t^— 1 


~d^ -^ 1^ ^ 'f — ? — f -\-^—f w T^P — d 


N 1 1 \ 

1 • 


=^^^- 


' • d" d^^ — t^ '\j ^ — d^-d-^-^ — ^ — ^ *— 


_J_,^^_^_ 



had you ra- ther, I'd mar-ried fair El -len, Or bring the brown girl home? The 



fe 



l-SjJ^ 



±t: 



brown girl she has house and land, Fair El - len - der she has none ; There 



rr= 



1^ 



--^ — V- 



:^-J=): 



•-d 



-N-ji — d-" 



jitzdi 



■^ 



l\ 



fore I warn you at your own ad-blessing To bring the brown girl home. 

K 

Sung by Mrs. Isabel A. Dame 
Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. (Mass.), in 1914 



ii 



=^^ 



fct 



3 



&=k: 



■^ 



1 . Lord Thom-as he was a bold for - est - er, A hunts- man of the King's 



^ 



*: 



*: 



IS 



^?^rrFi^ 



;i] 



iitit 



deer ; La - dy He-len she was a fair la - dy, Lord Thomas he loved her dear. 

61 



No. 17 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 



A 



i 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mr. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 



^=d: 



m 



I. Sweet Wil - liam he rose' in the month of May, He a 

(0 __ j^f) 



:p==^ 



^ 



t: 



fczit 



decked him - self 
(e) 



in blue, Say - ing : I long 



to know that . 



Sf3 



I 



-^ — N- 



long, long love has been Be - twixt La - dy Mar - get and me. 



i 



{a) 



?=?= 



-P-# 



P=P= 



l(^) 



(0 



^ 



• ^*— • 



ife?g^ i 



sa 



» 



-^ — ^^ 



w 



mi 



*— p- 



i 



(^) 



i^^g 



=^ 






(^) 



i^ 



(e) 



^i=^ 



■ s .J. J •— *- 



#-•- 



i 



» 



ifc^=j=^ 









2 No harm, no harm of Lady Marget, 
Nor she knows none by me, 

But before tomorrow morning at eight o'clock 
Lady Marget a bride shall see. 

3 Lady Marget was a-sitting in her bowing room 
Combing back her yellow hair, 

And she saw Sweet William and his new wedded bride, 
To church they did draw nigh. 

62 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

4 And it's down she stood her ivory comb 
And back she threw her hair. 

And it's you may suppose and be very well assured 
Lady Marget was heard no more. 

5 The time has passed away and gone 
For all men to be asleep, 

And something appeared to Sweet William and his new wedded bride 
And stood up at their bed feet. 

6 Saying : How do you like your bed making ? 
Or how do you like your sheets ? 

Or how do you like that new wedded bride 
That lies in your arms and sleeps ? 

7 Very well do I like my bed making, 
Much better do I like my sheets ; 
But the best of all is the gay lady 
That stands at my bed feet. 

8 The time was passed away and gone 
For all men to be awake. 

Sweet William he said he was troubled in his head 
By the dreams that he dreamed last night. 

9 Such dreams, such dreams cannot be true, 
I'm afraid they're of no good, 

For I dreamed that my chamber was full of wild swine 

And my bride's bed a-floating in blood. , 

ID He called down his waiting-men, ^''1$ ' 

One, by two, by three. 

Saying : Go and ask leave of my new wedded bride 
If Lady Marget I mayn't go and see. 

1 1 It's he rode up to Lady Marget's own bowing room, 
And he knocked so clear at the ring ; 

And who was so ready as her own born brother 
For to rise and let him in. 

12 Is Lady Marget in her own bowing room? 
Or is she in her hall ? 

Or is she high in her chambry 
Amongst her merry maids all ? 

13 Lady Marget's not in her bowing room, 
Nor neither is she in her hall ; 

But she is in her long coffin, 
Lies pale against yon wall. 

63 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

14 Unroll, unroll the winding-sheets, 
Although they're very fine, 

And let me kiss them cold pale lips 
Just as often as they've kissed mine. 

15 Three times he kissed her ivory cheeks, 
And then he kissed her chin, 

And when he kissed them cold pale lips 
There was no breath within. 

16 Lady Marget she died like it might be to-day, 
Sweet William he died on tomorrow ; 

Lady Marget she died for pure, true love, 
Sweet William he died for sorrow. 

17 Lady Marget were buried in yons churchyard. 
Sweet William was buried by her ; 

From her there sprung a red, red rose. 
From his there sprung a briar. 

18 The_y both growed up the old church wall 
Till, of course, could grow no higher, 

And they met and they tied in a true love's knot, 
For the rose rolled round the briar. 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b ( dorian )*. 



Sung by Mrs. Louisa Hensi.ey 
at Clay Co., Ky., 1910 



i 



:=fc- 



gi azi -^ 






^r-^ 



-^- 



I. La-dy Mar-gret was sit-ting in the new church door. A- comb-ing her yel-low 



iffi 



S 



s=± 



W 



— ^ 



F£ 



hair And down she threw her high -row comb. And out of the door she sprung. 

2 O mother, O mother, I saw a sight 
Which I never shall see any more. 

She dies, she never drew another breath, 
And she never lived any longer. 

3 Willy rode on home that night 
And quickly fell asleep. 
Bothered and pestered all night 
In a dream he dreamed before. 

•I.e. with tonic D. If C be tonic, Mode i, a -f- b ( lonian ). 

64 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

4 Early, early he rose up, 
Dressed himself in blue ; 
Asked of his new wedded wife 
To ride one mile or two. 

5 They rode on till they got to Lady Margret's gate, 
Tingled at the wire ; 

There was none so ready to let them m 
But Lady Margret's mother dear. 

6 Is she in her sewing-room ? 
Nor in her chamber asleep ? 
Or is she in her dining-room, 
A lady before them all ? 

7 She is not in her sewing-room, 
Nor in her chamber asleep; 
Although she's in her dying-room, 
A lady before them all. 

8 Her father opened the coffin lid, 
Her brother unwrapped the sheet ; 

He kneeled and kissed her cold clay lips 
And died all at her feet. 

9 They buried Lady Margret in the new church yard, 
And Willy close by her side ; 

And out of her heart sprang a red rose, 
And out of his a green briar. 

ID They grew and grew so very high, 
Uhtil they couldn't grow any higher ; 
They looped and tied in a true love knot 
The red rose and green briar. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b ( mixolydian). 

■ 1 ^ ^ N- 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, July. 31, 1916 



■«f=^ 



:=^ 



i 



--=]- 



-4z 



4=Jt=*-: 



^ 4 



=t: 



1. As she was sit- ting in her dow - er room, A - comb -ing back her hair. She 



=^=; 



t4^ 



=i 



d: 



=& 



ifcut 



B 



4 — i^ — 4 — 4- 

saw sweet William and his brown bro-den bride As they drew near to her. 



65 




Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

2 Lady Marget she rose in the dead hour of night 
When they'se all a-lying at sleep, 

Lady Marget she rose in the dead hour of night 
And stood at his bed feet. 

3 Says, how do you like your bed ? she says, 
And how do you like your sheet ? 

Or how do you like your brown broden bride 
That lays in your arms at sleep ? 

4 Very well, very well do I like my bed. 
But better do I like my sheet, 

But better do I like a lady gay 
Who stands at my bed feet. 

5 Sweet William arose at the dead hour of night 
When they was all a-lying at sleep, 

Sweet William arose at the dead hour of night 
And tingled on the ring. 

There was none so ready as her seven brothers 
To rise and let him come in. 

6 O where is Lady Marget, Lady Marget ? he cries, 
O where is Lady Marget ? says he ; 

For she's a girl I always did adore 
And she stole my heart from me. 

7 Is she in her dower room ? 
Or is she in the hall ? 

Or is she in her bed chambry 
Along with the merry maids all ? 

8 She is not in her dower room, 
Nor neither in the hall. 

But she is in her cold, cold cofifin 
. With her pale face toward the wall. 

9 And when he pulled the milk-white sheets 
That were made of satin so fine : 

Ten thousand times you have kissed my lips 
And now, love, I'll kiss thine. 

lo Three times he kissed her snowy white breast, 
Three times he kissed her cheek, 
But when he kissed her cold clay lips 
His heart was broke within. 



66 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

11 What will you have at Lady Marget's burying? 
Will you have bread and wine ? 

Tomorrow morning at eight o'clock 
The same shall be had at mine. 

12 They buried Lady Marget in our church-yard, 
And buried Sweet William by her ; 

And out of Sweet William's breast sprung a blood-red rose, 
And out of Lady Marget's a briar. 

13 They grew and grew to the top of the church, 
And they could grow no higher, 

And they tied a true love's knot 
And lived and died together. 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 






3EiE 



:?s=:t: 



Sung by Mrs. Rosie Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 



P^: 



:t=U=t: 



t^ 



I. Sweet Wil- Ham he rose one morn-ing in May, Redressed him-self in blue. And 



atzt 



pray will you tell me that long, long love Be-tween La - dy Mar-gret and you. 



2 I know nothing of Lady Margret, he says, 
Lady Margret knows nothing of me. 
To-morrow morning about eight o'clock 
Lady Margret my bride shall see. 

3 Lady Margret was in her dowel room, 
Combing back her yellow hair. 

She saw Sweet William and his new wedded wife 
As they drew near to her. 

4 O down she threw her ivory comb, 
And back she threw her hair, 
And running to her bed-chamber 
To never no more appear. 

5 The very same night they were all in the bed, 
They were all in the bed asleep, 

Lady Margret she rose and stood all alone 
And sung at Sweet William's bed feet. 

67 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

6 Saying : How do you like your bed, Sweet William ? 
Or how do you like your sheet ? 

Or how do you like your new wedded wife 
That lies in your arms and sleeps ? 

7 Very well, very well I like my bed, 
Very well I like my sheet, 

But ten thousand times better do I like the lady gay 
That stands at my bed-feet 

8 Sweet William he rose and stood all alone, 
He tingled at the ring. 

There was none so ready as her dear old mother 
To rise and let him come in. 

9 O Where's Lady Margret ? he says, 
O Where's Lady Margret ? he cries. 
Lady Margret is a girl I always adored, 
She hath stole my heart away. 

10 Or is she in her dowel room? 
Or is she in her hall ? 

Or is she in her bed-chamber 
Among her merry maids all ? 

11 She's neither in her dowel room, 
Nor neither in her hall ; 

Lady Margret she's in her cold coffin 
With her pale face all to the wall. 

12 O down he pulled the milk-white sheets 
That was made of satin so fine. 

Ten thousand times she has kissed my lips, 
So lovely I'll kiss thine. 

13 Three times he kissed her cherry, cherry cheeks, 
Three times he kissed her chin. 

And when he kissed her clay cold lips 
His heart it broke within. 

14 Saying: What will you have at Lady Margret's burying? 
Will you have some bread and wine ? 

To-morrow morning about eight o'clock. 
The same may be had at mine. 

15 They buried Lady Margret in the old church-yard, 
They buried Sweet William by her ; 

Out of Lady Margret's grave sprung a deep-red rose, 
And out of William's a briar. 

68 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 

i6 They grew to the top of the old church house, 
They could not grow any higher. 
And met and tied in a true love's knot, 
And the rose hung on the briar. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Miss WoNNiE Shelton 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 



Eii^ 



1. La - dy Mar - gret was sit - ting in her dow - er room. 



u 



t-^ 



comb - ing back her hair ; She 



i 



Sweet Wil - liam and his 



new wed - ded wife 



As 



they 



drew 



to 



her. 



Pentatonic. Modei. 



W- 



^ 



Sung by Mrs. Orilla Keeton 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 26, 1916 



1^-i^- 



-JtzztL 



O down she threw her i - vo - ry comb. And back she toss'd her 



=|: 



=J: 



:^ 



t=l 



EM 



hair ; . And a - down she fell from that high, high win - dow And 



1^— ^: 



:^=^ 



giS 



11 



nev - er was more seen there,seen there, And nev - er was more seen there. 



fM 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian ). 
(a) 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



4^q 



m 



2i 



y [/ 

When the night was spent and the day com - ing in And the 

69 



Fair Margaret and Sweet William 



--t 



^ 



most of them all was a - wake, Sweet Wil - Ham a - rose with 

(0 



m 



^ 



w 



trou - ble in his mind of the dream that had been last night. 



PS 



't- 



5 



=|: 



P 



70 



No. i8 

Lord Lovel 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 3, 1916 




I. Lord Lov - el was at his gate - side, A - cur- ry - ing his milk-white 



:i-- 



^ 



l¥. 



£^ 



53^ 



steed; Miss Nan - cy Bell come ri - ding by, A - wish - ing Lord Lov - el good 



m 



11 



^i=i 



i 



speed, good speed, A - wish - ing Lord Lov - el good speed. 
(a) 

m 



r- 



2 Where are you going, Lord Lovel ? she says, 
Where are you going ? says she. 

I'm going to ride my milk-white steed 
Some foreign country to see. 

3 How long will you be gone, Lord Lovel ? she says, 
How long will you be gone ? says she. 

One year, or two, or two, or three. 
Then 'turn to my Lady Nancy. 

4 He had not been gone but one year and one day. 
Strange thoughts rolled through his mind 



About his Lady Nancy. 

5 And so he mounted his milk-white steed 
And rode to London town, 

And there he heard the death-bells ringing 
And the people a-mourning all round. 

6 Who is dead ? Lord Lovel he said, 
Who is dead ? says he. 

Miss Nancy Bell from London town 
That is called your Lady Nancy. 



71 



Lord Lovel 

7 Go open her coffin, Lord Lovel he said, 
Pull down her shroud, says he, 

And let me kiss her cold, cold lips — 
And the tears come trinkling down. 

8 Go dig my grave, Lord Lovel he said, 
Go dig my grave, says he. 

For I have no longer in this world to stay 
For the loss of my Lady Nancy. 



72 



No. 19 



The Wife of Usher's Well 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



A 

Sung by Mr. Sol. and Miss Virginia Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 




?3=i 



I. She had - n't been 

-A ^ a 




ried but a ve - ry short 



t^ 



F^l 



g 



time Un - til chil - dren 



she had 



three ; She sent them 



-fS"- 



H h 



-0=^0^ 



S^ 



:2: 



^ 



tS*-^ 



i 



out to the north coun - tree To learn the gram - ma - ree. 

2 They hadn't been there before a very short time, 
Scarcely six weeks and three days, 

Till sickness came into that old town 
And swept her three babes away. 

3 She dreamed a dream when the nights were long, 
When the nights were long and cold ; 

She dreamed she saw her three little babes 
Come walking down to their home. 

4 She spread them a table all on a white cloth. 
And on it she put bread and wines. 

Come and eat, come and eat, my three little babes. 
Come and eat and drink those wines. 

5 Take it off, take it off, mother dear, cried they. 
For we can no longer stay, 

For yonder stands one, our Saviour dear. 
To take us in his arms. 

6 She spread them a bed in the backside room, 
And on it she put three sheets, 

And one of the three was a golden sheet, 
For the youngest one might sleep. 

7 Take it off, take it off, mother dear, cried they. 
For we can no longer stay. 

For yonder stands one, our Saviour dear, 
To take us in his arms. 

73 



The Wife of Usher's Well 

8 Dear mother, it is the fruits of your own pride heart 
That has caused us to lie in the clay. 
Cold clods at our head, green grass at our feel, 
We are wrapped in our winding-sheets. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 




iS: 



(^) 



Sung by Miss Linnie Landers 
at Carmen, N. C, Sept. 5, 1916 



^ 



3 



^—^ 



•^--^.-^^'—^—J- 



;2=^^z=^tS 



1 . They had - n't been there . . but a ve - ry short 



time, Till 




3^ 



4=: 



£ 



chil - dren 






:e 



they had . three. 



They 



sent them a 



:2: 



^ 



m 



::^ 



S 



:2=^ 



: m—:J '-1^— 'J 



na, To learn . . their gram-ma - ree. 



l(^) 



way to North Car-o - li 







^: 



-6'-=- 



i 



:i=^^ 



W- 



g^^l^l 



2 They hadn't been there but a very short time, 
Scarcely six weeks and three days, 

Till sickness came into that old town 
And swept her babes away. 

3 She dreamed a dream when the nights were long, 
When the nights were long and cold. 

She dreamed she saw her three little babes 
Come walking down to their home. 

4 She spread them a table on a milk-white cloth 
And on it she put cake and wine. 

Come and eat, come and eat, my three little babes, 
Come and eat and drink of mine. 

5 No mother, no mother, don't want your cakes, 
Nor neither drink your wine, 

For yonder stands our Saviour dear 
To take us in his arms. 



74 



The Wife of Usher's Well 

6 She fixed them a bed all in the back side room 
And on it she put three sheets, 

And one of the three were a golden sheet, 
Under it that the youngest might sleep. 

7 Take it off, take it off, dear mother, they said. 
For we haven't got long to stay. 

For yonder stands our Saviour dear, 
Where we must surely be. 

8 Dear mother, dear mother, it's the fruit of your poor pride heart 
That caused us to lie in the clay. 

Cold clods at their heads, green grass at their feet. 
We are wrapped in our winding-sheet. 



Pentatonic. Mode 4, b (no 2nd). 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff. Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 




^ 



2=i: 



^ > s 



:d= 



^ 



I, There was a la - dy and gay was she And chil - de 



S2 



t? f/ 



-V — V- 



id — #- 



^ 



=^=t 



ren she had three. She sent them a - way to the west - era coun - 




I 






=^=F 



try 



To 



learn 



all 



gram - ma 



2 They hadn't been gone but a very short time. 
Scarcely three weeks and a day, 

Till death came along through them dark woods 
And swept them all away. 

3 There is a King in the Heavens all bright, 
He used to wear a crown. 

I hope he'll send me my three babes to-night 
Or in the morning soon. 

4 The beds was fixed in the back wall room, 
Spread over with clean sheets. 

And on the top was a golden cloth 
That they might rest and sleep. 

75 



The Wife of Usher's WeU 

5 The table was set in the dining-room, 
Spread over with cakes and wine. 
Go sit down, my three little babes, 
And eat and drink of mine. 

6 Take it off, take it off, dear mother, said they. 
Take it off, I say again. 

For we'll not be here till the break of day ; 
My Saviour will call us away. 

7 Rise up, rise up, said the oldest one, 
I think it's almost day. 

See my Saviour standing by 
To welcome us three home. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. DoRA Shelton 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 15, 1916 



F^il 



Pret - ty Pol - ly had - n't been mar - ried but 



ve - ry short 



r=» 



i 



A 



8^=F^=f 



^E4: 



^ 



-"S'-r- 



time. When she 



had her three lit - tie babes ; She sent them a 



m 



d3 



g ^g gs^ i^^^ 



-(»-T- 



h±2: 



P 



way to the North coun • try To 



learn . . their gram-ma - ree. 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



m 



=i=FP 



^4=J 



it 



^a 



in 



I. Come in, come in, my two lit - tie babes And eat and drink with 



is 



^ife^ 



me ; We will nei - ther eat, sweet Mo - ther 



dear, Nor 



t 



i 



nei - ther drink of wine. For yon - der stands our Sa • viour dear, And 

76 



The Wife of Usher's WeU 



i 



^- 



5^ 



w 



to him we must join, And to him we must join. 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, b. 



Sung by Mrs. ZiPPO Rice 
at Rice Cove, Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 15, 1916 



^3: 



:2: 



-4-- 



' — s^^ 



^^E^ 



-" 12 



There was a wo - man of the North, She had but 



i 



m 



: j J— J : 



S 



&=&ZL 



EfE2EE 



-«■-; N f--# P 



^ 



4;^ 



^ 



on - ly three babes ; She sent them a - way to the priest of the 



^k 



:S^. 



13: 



:i 



North To 



' <S>-r- 



learn their gram - mar through. 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



!a 






&=^ 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 



- ^ - J *—i^ 



* ^ 






(<») 



P 



4 ! ^ <y - 



^ 



it*: 






4^ 



i^ZJZi T^-r 



^^<»- 



F^ 



i 



(a) 



;^ 



-(2 S>- 



^^ 



H 



Pentatonic. Mode 4, b (no 2nd). 



Sung by Mrs. SusAN Sawyer 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



F^fe 



^m 



a=i=^-:^^r 



a: 



I. There was a la - dy lived in York Those chil-dren she had 



:^^=^^ 



S 



^«=^ 



a^ iz^Z^T J g^ 



3: 



jtzztii: 



three ; She sent them off to some north coun - try To learn their gram-ma - ree. 

77 



No. 20 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 



A 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Becky Griffin 
at Big Laurel, N- C. Aug. 17, 1916 




I. One day, one day, one high hoi ■ i - day. The ve • ry first day in the 




t: 



year, Lit - tie Matth - y Groves went to the church. The 



d=d=i 



:d: 



4: 



-^ 



t 



Ho - ly Word to hear, hear, The Ho - ly Word to hear. 



2 Lord Dannel's wife was standing by, 
She cast her eye on him. 

Go home with me, little Matthy Groves, 
A wedded wife to be. 

3 Hark, hark, hark, hark, said little Matthy Groves, 
I cannot spare my life, 

I know by the rings you wear on your fingers, 
You are Lord Dannel's wife. 

4 It's if I am Lord Dannel's wife, 
It IS nothing to you. 

Lord Dannel's gone to Kentucky 
King Georgie for to view. 

5 Rise, up, rise up, little Matthy Groves, 
And men's clothing put on. 

It never shall be said in the old Scotland 
I slewed a naked man. 

6 Hark, hark, hark, hark says little Matthy Groves 
I cannot spare my life. 

It's you have swords by your side 
And I have ne'er a knife. 

7 It's I've got swords by my side, 
They cost me from my purse, 
And you can have the very best 
And I will have the worst. 



78 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

8 The very first lick Lord Dannel struck, 
He wound little Matthy deep ; 

And the very next lick Lord Dannel struck 
Little Matthy fell at his feet. 

9 He took his lady by the right hand, 
He set her on his knee. 

Tell to me which you love best, 
Little Matthy Groves or me. 

lo Very well I like your red rosy cheeks, 
Very well I like your chin, 
But better I like little Matthy Groves 
Than Lord Dannel and all his kin. 



B 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 



Pentatonic. 


VIode 3. 








at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 




<1T>^0 


1 1 


Q 1 


ft 


/[. it -^ 1 


J ' 


'» 1 ^ 


Is 


v\^ o 


J • 


1 


^ 


^ 


*i J 


ct 


iLi — 2_; — 1 


r 


— « — 


— 1 — 


— h — ^ 


-^— J ^ ^ d-. J 1 


.2 



I. The first come down was 



ra - van white, And the 




next come down was 


a pel - ly. 


And the 


next come down 


was Lord 


/ffji'^o r 1^ 1 


1 ^ 


^ 


1 


> H ^ « I J 1 1 


1 l"^ s s 1 


(?\ ff „ • d,, _A 


-J A 


- J ^- 


— ^ H 1 


-A fs 1 


^W—"^ 


-• • 1 




— * • — • 


V V ^ 




Thom - as' 
{a) 



wife And she was the fair - est of them 



5 



^ 



aU, 



all, And 



y 



she was 
{a) 



the fair - est of them all. 



13^ 



i 



t 



2 Little Matthy Groves was a-standing by ; 
She placed her eyes on him. 

Saying : You're the darling of my heart 
And the darling of my life. 

3 It's you no home, no place to lie. 
Go home with me this night. 

I think by the rings you wear on your fingers 
You are Lord Thomas's wife. 
79 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

4 True, I am Lord Thomas's wife 
Lord Thomas is not at home. 

The little foot-page was a-standing by, 

These words heareth he, 

And he licked to his heels and run. 

5 He run, he run to the broken-down bridge. 
He bent to his breast and swum ; 

He swum, he swum to the other, other side. 
And he buckled up his shoes and he run. 

6 He run, he run to Lord Thomas's gate 
And he dingled at the ring and it rung. 
And he dingled at the ring and it rung. 
What news, what news, my little foot-page ? 
What news you've brought to me ? 

Little Matthy Groves is at your house 
In the bed with the gay lady. 

7 If that be a lie you've brought to me 
And a lie I expect it to be. 

If there is e'er a green tree in these whole worlds 
A hangman you shall be. 

8 If that be the truth you've brought to me. 
And the truth I don't expect it to be, 
You may wed my youngest daughter 
And you may have all I've got. 

9 Lord Thomas's wife raised up about half a doze asleep. 
Lay still, lay still, little Matthy Groves says, 

Lay still I tell to thee, 

For it's nothing, but your father's little shepherd boy 

A-driving the wolves from the sheep. 

ID When little Matthy Groves did wake 
Lord Thomas was at his feet. 
Rise up, rise up. Lord Thomas he says. 
And put your clothing on. 
For it never shall be known in old England 
That I slew a naked man. 

1 1 How can I rise up, he says. 
When I am afeard of my life ? 
For you have two good broad-edged swords 
And I have not so much as a knife. 

80 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

12 True, I have two good broad swords 
They cost me deep in the purse. 
But you may have the very best one 
And you may have the first lick. 

13 The very first lick little Matthy Groves struck, 
He struck him across the head, 

And the very next lick Lord Thomas he struck, 
And it killed little Matthy Groves dead. 

14 He took his gay lady by the hand, 
And he led her up and down. 

He says : How do you like my blankets 
And how do you like my sheets ? 

15 Well enough your blankets 
And well enough your sheets, 

But much better do I love little Matthy Groves 
Within my arms asleep. 

16 He took his gay lady by the hand 
And he pulled her on his knee, 

And the very best sword that he did have 
He split her head into twine (twain). 



Hexatonic. Mode 3. b. 



Sung by Mr. David Norton 
at Rocky Fork, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



rf|E3 



^J: 



=t 



^ 



I. The next come down was dressed in red, The next come down in 




t: 




green, The next come down was a pret - ty lit - tie Miss, Dress'd 
(a) 



s 



^- 



X 



-si- 



fin - er than a ■ ny queen, queen, Dress'd fin - er than a • ny queen. 




81 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

2 She stepped up to little Matthy Groves 
And says : Come and go with me. 

I know by the rings that is on your hand 
You are Lord Dannel's wife, 
That you are Lord Dannel's wife. 

3 It makes no difference by the rings on my hand, 
Nor whose wife I am. 

My husband he's not at home, 
He's in some foreign land. 

4 Little foot Dannel (page?) was standing by, 
And he heard every word they were saying. 
If I live till broad daylight 

Lord Dannel shall know of this. 

5 He had about fifteen miles to go 
And ten of them he run ; 

He swum till he came to the river 
And he held his breath and swum. 

6 He swum till he came to the grassy green grove, 
He sprang to his feet and he run ; 

He run till he came to Lord Dannel's gate 
And he rang his bells and rung. 

7 Is my castle burning down, 

Or what is a-going to be done ? 
No, your wife's with another man 
And both of their hearts are one. 

8 He gathered him up about fifty good men, 
And done it with a good will. 

He put his bugle to his mouth 
And blowed it with a shrill. 

9 How do you like my pillow, sir, 
How do you like my sheet. 

And how do you like the pretty little girl 
That lies in your arms asleep ? 

10 Very well do I like your pillow, sir, 
Very well do I like your sheet. 

But very much better do I like the pretty little girl 
That lies in my arms asleep. 

1 1 Little Matthy Groves struck the very first lick, 
Which made Lord Dannel sore. 

Lord Dannel struck the very next lick 
And killed little Matthy on the floor. 
82 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

12 He took his wife by the lily-white hand 
And he sat her upon his knee. 

Said : Which one do you love best, 
Little Matthy Groves or me ? 

13 He took his wife by the lily-white hand 
And he led her through the hall. 

He jobbed the pistol in her breast 
And she fell with a special ball. 

14 Go bury me on yonder church hill 
With Matthy in my arms asleep. 

And bury Lord Dannel at my feet. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mr. Hilliard Smith 
at Hindman, Ky., Aug. 10, 1909 




blue, The next came in Lord Vanner's wife. The flow - er of the view. 

2 This young Magrove a-being there, 
Fair as the morning sun. 

She looked at him and he looked at her, 
The like was never known. 

3 She stepped up to him and says : Kind Sir, 
Won't you take a ride with me ? 

4 I dare not to, I dare not to, 
I dare not to for my life ; 

From the ring that you wear on your finger, 
You are Lord Vanner's wife. 

5 Well, if I am Lord Vanner's wife, 
Lord Vanner is not at home, 

Lojd Vanner is to redemption gone, 
To King McHenry's throne. 

6 This little foot-page a-being by, 
Hearing every word they said. 

He swore Lord Vanner should have the news 
Before the rising sun. 
83 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

7 He run till he came to the river side, 
And he jumped in and swam, 

He swam and he swam to the other side, 
And he rose and run. 

8 He run till he: came to McHenry's throne, 
He dingled so loud with the ring. 

There's none so ready as Lord Vanner himself 
To arise and let him in. 

9 What news, what news ? my little foot-page, 
What news have you brought to me ? 

Has any of casten walls fell down, 
Or any of my men false be ? 

10 There's none of your casten walls fell down, 
Nor none of your men false be. 

This young Magrove is in fair Scotland 
In bed with your lady. 

1 1 If this be lie you bring to me, 
As I believe it to be, 

I'll build a gallow just for you, 
And hangen you shall be. 

12 If this^be lie I bring to you 
As you believe it to be, 

You needn't build any gallows for me. 
Just hang me on a tree. 

13 Lord Vanner calling up his best men, 
By one, by two, by three. 

Saying : Let's take a trip to fair Scotland, 
This happy couple for to see. 

14 They rolled and they rolled all over the bed 
Till they fell fast asleep. 

And when they woke Lord Vanner was there 
A-standing at their bed feet. 

1 5 It's how do you like my blanket, sir ? 
It's how do you like my sheet ? 
How do you like that fair lady, 
That lies in your arms asleep. 

16 Very well I like your blanket, sir, 
Very well I like your sheet, 

Ten thousand times better I like this fair lady 
Lies in my arms asleep. 

84 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

17 Get up, get up, put on your clothes, 
And fight me like a man ; 
Never should have been said in fair Scotland 
I killed a naked man. 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mr. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 



^ 



]S=Ep==:p=P= 



^: 



:t=tA: 



I. It's ho - li- , ho - li- , ho - li - day, The ve - ry first day in the 



-N- — 



:t=p: 



year. Lit - tie Matt - hy Groves he went to the church, The 



3^3 



;i 



t 



It 



Ho - ly Word to hear, hear. The Ho - ly Word to hear. 

is 



^—t f f—W^ 



d: 



i 



^^ 



I 



§^ -UU^ =a 



lE=p: 



=J=^ 



z? — r 



2 If I am Lord Thomas's wife, 
Lord Thomas is not at home. 
He's gone away to his false taverin 
His prentiss for to see. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 1916 



tt 



SfeE: 



3 



:±=± 



^ ^ 



:. Well, if I am Lord Dan - nel's wife, Lord Dan - nel is not at 



'^^=^. 



d^=i 



^iS 



home; He's gone o - ver yon - der to yon bright church The 



i 



d=± 



U 



Ho - ly Word to hear, 

(a) , 



'$=^? 



i 



The Ho - ly Word to hear. 

1^ 



i 






85 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

1 Go home with me, little Matthy Groves, 
And keep me from the cold. 

I wouldn't go home with you to-night 
If I know'd it would save your life. 
For I can tell by the rings on your fingers 
That you're Lord Dannel's wife. 

2 Well, if I am Lord Dannel's wife, 
Lord Dannel is not at home ; 

He's gone over yonder to yon bright church 
The Holy Word to hear. 

3 His little foot-page was standing by, 
He took to his heels and run ; 

He run till he came to the broken bridge. 
And he laid upon his breast and swum. 

4 O Lord Dannel, you'd better go home. 
Little Matthy Groves in bed with your wife 
Keeping her from the cold. 

5 I heard Lord Dannel's bugle blow. 
Lay still, lay still, little Matthy Groves, 
And keep me from the cold. 

For it's only my father's shepherd boy 
Driving the sheep from the fold. 

6 O how do you like my fine feather bed ? 
And how do you like my sheet ? 

And how do you like my pretty little wife, 
That lies in your arms asleep ? 

7 Very well do I like your fine feather bed. 
Very well do I like your sheet ; 

Much better do I like your sweet little wife 
That lay in my arms asleep. 

8 Get up from there, little Matthy Groves, 
And put you on your clothes. 

I wouldn't have it known in this native land 
I'd slain a naked man. 

9 I'll get up, put on my clothes, 
I'll fight you for my life. 

Your two bright swords hang by your side, 
And me not even a knife. 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

10 My two bright swords hang by my side, 
They cost me in my purse, 

But you shall have the best of them 
And I will have the worst. 

1 1 You shall have the very first lick, 
You strike it like a man, 

And I will take the very next lick, 
I'll kill you if I can. 

12 Little Matthy had the very first lick, 
He struck and hit the floor. 

Lord Dannel had the very next lick, 
Little Matthy struck no more. 

13 He took her by the lily-white hand. 
He laid her on his knee. 

Which do you like the best of the two, ■ 
Little Matthy Groves or me ? 

14 Very well do I like your red rosy cheeks, 
Also your dimpling chin, 

Much better do I like little Matthy Groves 
Than any of your kin. 

15 He took her by the lily-white hand. 
He led her in the hall. 

He drew his sword, cut off her head 
And kicked it against the wall. 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Miss Laura Brewer, 
Clay Co., Ky., in 1909. 



:(i): 



-¥ — ^ 



-y — ^ 



I. Ho - 11-, ho - 11-, ho - li - day, On the ve - ry first day of the 




^E^^EEE 



:«zzz:d 



year, Lit - tie Matth - y Grove went to the church Tke 



5 



^- s 



=1: 



---X 



^ 



Ho - ly Word to hear, hear, The Ho - ly Word to hear. 

87 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

2 First came down was the lady gay, 
The next came down was a girl, 

The next came down was Lord Donald's wife, 
The flowers of the world. 

3 She placed her arm on little Matthy Grove, 
Says : Matthy, go home with me, 

This night, this night. 
This livelong night to sleep. 

4 I am darsing of my life, 

I can't go home with you. 

I know you by your finger rings. 

You are Lord Donald's wife. 

5 If I am Lord Donald's wife. 
Lord Donald is gone from home. 
He's gone across the water side. 
He's gone over there to stay. 

6 Little Speedfoot was standing by 
To see what he could hear. 

And as he saw them both walk off, 
He picked up his heels and run. 

7 He ran till he came to the river side, 
He bent his breast and swam, 
Swam till he came to the other side 
And he picked up his heels and ran. 

8 He ran till he came to the high King Gate ; 
He rattled the bell and it rung. 

What news, what news, little Speedfoot, he says, 
What news do you bring me ? 

9 Is my old scaffold burned down ? 
Or is my tavern run ? 

Or is ray lady gay put to bed. 
With a daughter or a son ? 

lo No, your scaffold's not burned down, 
Nor your tavern's not run ; 
Nor your lady gay is not put to bed 
With a daughter or a son. 
But little Matthy Grove is at your own house 
In bed with your lady gay. 

88 



Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 

11 Little Donald he had two bright, keen swords, 
Little Matthy he had none. 

Lord Donald said to get up and put on his clothes 

And fight him like a man — 

That he couldn't fight a naked man. 

12 Put on your clothes and fight me for your life. 
How can I fight you and me not even a knife ? 



H 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Jas. Gabriel Coaxes 
at Flag Pond, Sept. i, 191 6 



:t=t 



jv-1 



Se5 



2=i=bi 



:^= 



:j^— 4- 



4 4 ^ 



#— ^ 



I. One ho - 11 - day, one right- eous day, One hoi - i - day in the year, Lit -tie 



1^ 



d^ 



•-^ 



^S^ 



5 



-s*- 



;[| 



Matthy Groves went out to church,The righteous word to hear,Thc righteous word to hear. 



89 



No. 21 



Barbara Allen 



i 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 

I 



Sung by Miss Lula McCoy 
at Chicopee Co., Ga., 1914 



S: 



:^: 



1^1= 



^ 



I. In yon-ders town where I was born There lived three maid -ens 



i 



m^ 



£^ 



- 'S^-a^- 



f= 






ii: 



dwel-ling ; The on - ly one that I called my own,Hername was Bar-b'ra Al-len. 

2 I was taken sick, so very sick, 
Death on my brows were dwelling. 
I sent for the only one I loved, 
Her name was Barbara Allen. 

3 I am sick, so very sick, 

Death on my brows are dwelling. 
And none of the better will I ever be 
Till I get Barbara Allen. 

4 You remember the day, the bright groom day, 
When you passed your dranks so willing ? 
You gave your dranks to the ladies all, 

But you slighted Barbara Allen. 

5 I remember the day, the bright groom day, 
When I passed my dranks so willing. 

I gave my dranks to the ladies all, 
And my love to Barbara Allen. 

6 He turned his pale face to the wall 
And bursted out to crying. 

She turned her back on Sweet Willie's bed 
And tipped downstairs a-smiling. 

7 I had not got but a mile from the place 
Till I heard his death-bells ringing. 
And as they rung they seemed to say : 
Hard-hearted Barbara Allen. 

8 I looked to the East, I looked to the West, 
I saw his coffin coming. 

Lay down, lay down his cold, clay corpse 
And let me gaze upon him. 

90 



Barbara Allen 

9 I went right home to my mother dear, 

Says : Make my death bed long and narrow. 
Sweet Willie has died for me to-day, 
I'll die for him tomorrow. 

ID Sweet Willie he died like as to-day, 
And Barbara as tomorrow ; 
Sweet Willie died with the purest love, 
And Barbara died with sorrow. 

1 1 Sweet Willie was buried in one churchyard, 
And Barbara in another. 

A rose bud sprang from Willie's grave. 
And a briar from Barbara Allen's. 

12 They grew and they grew to the tall church door ; 
They could not grow any higher. 

They linked and tied in a true love's knot 
And the rose wrapped around the briar. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Miss FLORENCE MacKinney 
at Habersham Co., Ga., May 28, 1910 



^m 



& 



s 



^=t 



•—^ 



±UtL 



I. 'Twas in the mer - ry month of May, . When ail gay flow - ers were 



^^h 






to=5 



^=i 



bloom-ing.Sweet William on his death-bed lay, For the love of Bar - b'ra Al-len. 



He sent his servant to the town. 
He sent him to her dwelling. 
Saying : Master's sick and very sick, 
And for your sake he's dying. 

Slowly, slowly, she gets up. 

And to his bedside going, 

She drew the curtains to one side 

And says : Young man, you're dying. 

He reached out his pale, white hands 
Intending for to touch her. 
She jumped, she skipped all over the room, 
And says : Young man, I won't have you. 

91 



Barbara Allen 

5 He turned his pale face to the wall 
And bursted out a-crying, 

Saying : Adieu to thee, adieu to all, 
Adieu to Barbara Allen. 

6 She had not more than reached the town, 
She heard the death bells tolling. 

She looked to the east, she looked to the west, 
And saw his pale face coming. 

7 Hand down, hand down that corpse of clay 
And let me gaze upon him. 

The more she gazed, the more she grieved, 
And she bursted out a-crying. 

8 Cursed, cursed, be my name, 
And cursed be my nature. 

For this man's life I might have saved 
If I had done my duty. 

9 O mother, O mother, go make my bed. 
And make it long and narrow. 

Sweet William died for me to-day. 
And I'll die for him tomorrow. 

10 Sweet William died on Saturday night, 
Miss Barbara died on Sunday, 

The old lady died for the love of both, 
She died on Easter Monday. 

1 1 Sweet William was carried to one churchyard. 
Miss Barbara to another. 

A briar grew out of one of their graves, 
A rose tree out of the other. 

1 2 They grew as high as the old church top. 
They could not grow any higher. 

They bound and tied in a true love's knot, 
For all true lovers to admire. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Miss RoxiE Gay 
at Chicopee Co., Ga., Feb. 19 14 




:2: 






I. One cold and cloud- y day in the month of May.When the ros - es was a 




a 



^=i=#= 

•-*^- 



-zi— 



;2z^^ 



-ei- 



bud -ding, A young man lay on his death-bed In love with Bar-b'ra El-len. 

92 



I 



Barbara Allen 

2 He sent his servants after her 
And for his sake he sent them : 
My master's sick and about to die 
And for your sake he's dying. 

3 Slowly, slowly, she got up, 
And went away unto him, 
Saying : Kind Sir, 

You are pale looking. 

4 O yes, my love, I'm mighty sick, 

A kiss or two - 

From your sweet lips 

Would save me from this dying. 

5 He turned his pale cheeks toward the wall ; 
She turned her back upon him, 

Saying : Kind sir, you're none the better of me, 
If your heart's blood was a-spilling. 

6 Slowly, slowly she gets up 
And goes away and leaves him. 

She hadn't rode but a mile in town, - - 

She heard his death bells ringing. 

7 They rung so clear unto her ear 
That she commence lamenting. 

She looked to the East and she looked to the West, 
She saw his cold corpse coming. 

8 Go bring him here as cold as clay 
And let me look upon him. 

9 Go and tell to my parents most dear, 
Who would not let me have him. 

Go and tell to the rest of my kin folk, 
Who caused me to forsake him. 

ID Sweet Willie was buried on Saturday night, 
Barbara was buried on Sunday. 
Both of the mothers died for them, 
Was buried on Easter Monday 

1 1 Sweet Willie was buried in the new churchyard, 
Barbara was buried close beside him. 
A red rose grew from sweet Willie's breast, 
A briar grew from her feet. 

93 



Barbara Allen 

12 They grew as high as the new church house, 
They could not grow any higher ; 
They grew and tied in a true love knot, 
A rose grew on the briar. 



D 



A 

^5^ 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 
(a) 



Sung by Mrs. Ellie Johnson 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



S=:l==^ 



=1: 



W- 



-<Si-r- 



it 



E 



-(&-i- 



I. Sweet Wil - liam was down to his dwell to - day, He's 



£ 



±L 



^Zt 



^^ 



^- 



4== 



down to his dwell a - drink - ing. He passed his wine to 



:& 



5 



5 



itzt 



rfi 



i 



la 



dies all, He slight - ed Bar 



=F=t 



e 



b'ra El 



len. 



i 



I 



¥■ 



«— «= 



2 There stands three young ladies so fair. 
They're dressed in every colour. 
There's not but one that I call my own 
And that is Barbara Ellen. 

3 It wasn't very long before William taken sick, 
Death was all he dreaded. 

Sent his love for Barbara to come, 
She come, she come a-running. 

4 And all she said when she got there : 
Young man, I think you're dying. 

O yes, I'm sick, I'm very sick 
And never be no better. 

5 It wasn't very long till Barbara started home. 
She heard the corpse bells ringing. 

She looked East, she looked West 
And saw the pale corpse coming. 



94 



Barbara Allen 

6 Unfold, unfold those lily-white sheets 
And let me look upon him. 

Sweet William died for me to-day, 
I'll die for him tomorrow. 

7 Sweet William died on Saturday night, 
And Barbara on Sunday. 

The old woman died for the love of both, 
She died on Easter Monday. 

8 On William's grave a turtle dove, 
On Barbara's grave a sparrow. 
The turtle dove is the sign of love. 
The sparrow was for sorrow. 



Hexatonic. Mode 6, b. 



Sung by Mr. Alfred H. Norton 
at Rocky Fork, Tenn., Sept. 2, 1916 



i^ 



m 



'-M 



:d2 



I. All in the month, the month of May, The 



■Si^=t3^ 



5^ 



green buds they were swell - ing. They swelled till all pret - ty 



P5 



S 



I 



2=^ 



Bar - ba - ry her Sweet Wil - liam. 



birds chose their mates And 



2 He sent a letter through the town 
To Barbary Allen's dwelling. 

Saying : Here's a young man sick and he sends for you, 
For you to come and see him. 

3 She walked in, she walked in. 
She placed her eyes upon him. 

The very first word that she said to him : 
Young man, I think you're dying. 

4 I know I'm sick and very sick. 
And sorrow it is dwelling with me. 
No better, no better I never will be 
Until I get Barbary Allen. 

95 



Barbara Allen 

5 I know you're sick and very sick, 
And sorrow it is dwelling with you. 
No better, no better you never will be, 
For you'll never get Barbary Allen. 

6 He turned his pale face to the wall, 
He burst out a-crying, 

Saying : Adieu, adieu to the ladies all around, 
Farewell to Barbary Allen. 

7 Don't you remember last Saturday night 
When I were at your tavern, 

You swang you treated the ladies all around, 
You slighted Barbary Allen. 

8 She rode, she rode a mile from town 
The small birds they were singing, 
They sung so loud, they sung so swift, 
Hard-hearted Barbary Allen. 

9 She looked East, she looked West, 
She saw the cold corpse coming. 

Saying : Lay him down on this cold ground 
And let me look upon him. 

ID The more she looked the more she mourned 
Till she burst out a-crying, 

Saying : I could have saved this young man's life 
If I'd a-tried my true endeavour. 

1 1 O mother, O mother, O fix my bed. 
Go fix it long and narrow. 

Sweet William he died for me to-day, 
And I'll die for him tomorrow. 

1 2 O father, O father, go dig my grave. 
Go dig it deep and narrow. 

Sweet William he died for me to-day, 
And I'll die for him tomorrow. 

13 They buried Sweet William in the old churchyard 
And Barbary close by the side of him. 

At the head of Sweet William's grave there sprung a red rose 
And Barbary Allen's was a briar. 

14 They grew, they grew to the top of the church 
And they could not grow any higher. 

They leaned and tied in a true lover's knot 
And the rose hanged on to the briar. 
96 



Barbara Allen 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



Sung by Miss Ada B. Smith 
at Knott Co., Ky., Dec. 16, 1907 



g 



=t 



2=^=^3:3: 



2: 






3=^=r ^^ 



^ 



=^= 



I. 'Twas in the mer - ry month of May, The green buds were swel- ling, Poor 



i 



E 



:t: 



^^^i^=J^ 



Wil - liam Green on his death-bed lay For the love of Bar - b'ra El - len. 

2 He sent his servant to the town 

To the place where she was dwelling, 
Saying : Love, there is a call for you. 
If your name is Barbara Ellen. 

3 She was very slowly getting up 
And very slowly going, 

And all she said when there she come : 
Young man, I believe you're dying. 

4 O yes, I know I'm very bad, 
And never will be any better 
Until I have the love of one, 
The love of Barbara Ellen. 

5 He turned his pale face toward the wall, 
And death was in him dwelling. 
Adieu, adieu, adieu to my dear friends. 
Be kind to Barbara Ellen. 

6 When she got in about two miles of town, 
She heard the death bells ringing. 

She says : Come around, you nice young men, 
And let me look upon you. 

7 O mother, O mother, come make my bed. 
Come make it both soft and narrow 

For Sweet William died to-day. 
And I will die tomorrow. 

8 O father, O father, come dig my grave, 
Come dig it both deep and narrow. 
For sweet William died in love. 

And I will die in sorrow. 



97 



Barbara Allen 

9 Sweet William was buried in the old church tomb, 
Barbara Ellen was buried in the yard. 
Out of sweet William's grave grew a green, red rose, 
Out of Barbara Ellen's a briar. 

lo They grew and grew to the old church top 
And still they couldn't grow any higher, 
And at the end tied a true love-knot, 
The rose wrapped around the briar. 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



Sung by Miss Emma Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 

f7\ 



1^ 



^i=W- 



-P— h»- 



^ 



^ 



:£ij= 



-^ 



I. All in the mer - ry month of May, When green buds they were swel - ling, Young 



1^ 



l=P= 



:fc 



^S^^^m 



X 



Jem - my Grove on his death- bed lay For love of Bar - b'ra El - len. 



H 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 1916 



|2= 
-4W 



%—^=^ V 



l=H»= 



^ 



^ 



-•—^ 



• ' eJ #- 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Miss Wonnie Shelton 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 



:a 






-•— # 






S 



I 



^L_^^ i=gziH-r— r 



s^ 



^ 



• — ^ 



-ll-^» 



98 



Barbara Allen 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Miss Donna Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 9, 1916 



*3: 



^=i= 



tr- 



f'^-tt- 



m 



Ha- 



^P 



J=ia=i 



^^ 



:4=^ 






;2 ^=F=p=^ 



j=t t=t=^ 



-(S'-T- 



99 



a^^foii^ 



No. 



22 



Giles Collins 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, b ( no 6th ). 



Sung by Mrs. Dora Shelton 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 2, 1916 



7!^«^—r- 


— • 


• — 


N — 


— • 




pj- 


I* 


1* 







^)-H—J 


—v 


^ 


• 


r ■ 


' 


--• 


:=t 


-=x=- 


1 

— ^ — 






I. George Col - lins come home 



last 



Fri - day night, And 



2^E 



^ 



there he 



take sick 

^ — 



and 



died ; 



And when 



Mrs 



Col - lins 



1=T 



w 



tr- 



heard George was dead, She wrung her hands and cried. 

2 Mary in the hallway, sewing her silk, 
She's sewing her silk so fine, 

And when she heard that George were dead. 
She threw her sewing aside. 

3 She followed him up, she followed him down, 
She followed him to his grave, 

And there all on her bended knee 
She wept, she mourned, she prayed. 

4 Hush up, dear daughter, don't take it so hard, 
There's more pretty boys than George. 
There's more pretty boys all standing around, 
But none so dear as George. 

5 Look away, look away, that lonesome dove 
That sails from pine to pine ; 

It's mourning for its own true love 
Just like I mourn for mine. 

6 Set down the coffin, lift up the lid, 
And give me a comb-so fine. 

And let me comb his cold, wavy hair, 
For I know he'll never comb mine. 

7 Set down the coffin, lift up the lid. 
Lay back the sheetings so fine, 
And let me kiss his cold, sweet lips, 
For I know he'll never kiss mine. 



100 



Giles Collins 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a + b ( no 6th ). 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 16, 1916 



:^ti 


• — • — • — •— 

H i 1 1 


m P f P • M • P T 


r-\ 1 ^— 1 


LiJlJi-^ — 1 


-V — V — V — 1 — 


-r-=t:F— ^-U^h^^l U=L 


—f. — p ' 4 • — 

—V ' ^^^' ^ 



I. George Col- lins came home last Friday night And then took sick and died. His 



^ 



m 



^ 



a 



^- 



girl sat in the next door side A - sew - ing her silk so fine. 

2 And when she heard George Collins was dead 
She laid her silk aside, 

And fell down on her trembling knee 
And wept and mourned and cried. 

3 O Mary, O Mary, what makes you weep, 
What makes you weep and mourn. 

What makes you weep when you ought to be asleep? 
O Lord, I've lost a friend. 

4 God bless the dove that mourns for love 
And flies from pine to pine. 

It mourns for the loss of its own true love. 

why not me for mine ? 

5 I followed Geoge Collins by day, by day, 

1 followed him to his grave. 
Lay off, lay ofif those coffin lids 
And spread the sheets so fine. 

6 Lay off, lay off, those coffin lids 
And spread the sheets so fine. 
And let me kiss his cold, clay lips. 
O Lord, he'll never kiss mine. 



c 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, b (no 6th). 



Sung by Miss Mary McKinney 
at Henderson Co., N. C, 19 14 






^ 



:1: 



^ 



I. George Col - lins came home last Wednes - day night And 



-A 



-t 



there took sick and 



died ; 



And when 



Mrs 



Col - lins 



101 



Giles Collins 



m 



g 



heard George was dead, She bowed her head . and died. 

2 His own little bride was in the hall, 
Sewing her silk so fine, 

And she heard that George was dead, 
She threw it all aside. 

3 She followed him up, she followed him down, 
She followed him to his grave. 

And there upon her bended knees, 
She wept, she mourned, she prayed. 

4 O daughter, O daughter, the mother then said. 
There is more young men than George ; 
There is more young men standing round 

To hear you weep and mourn. 

5 O mother, O mother, the daughter then said, 
There is more young men than George ; 
There is more young men standing round. 
But none so dear as he. 

6 Sit down the casket, take off the lid. 
Fold back the sheets so fine, 

And let me kiss his cold, sweet lips, 
I'm sure he'll never kiss mine. 

7 Look away over yonder at the lonesome dove, 
It flies from pine to pine, 

Mourning for its own true love. 
Why shoudn't I mourn for mine ? 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



i 



« 



(") 



Sung by Mr. Dana Norton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



fi=> 



t= 



E^ 



^ 



g 



I. George Col - lins on one win - ter night, George Col - lins so fine, George 



w 



Col - lins on one win - ter night Was ta - ken sick - en and died. 

102 



* 



-# — f" 



(a) 



(^) 



Giles Collins 



^ 



£ 



^ — ^ — r- 



fe-^ 



m 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



(^) 



Sung by Miss Viney Norton 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 16, 1916 

(0 



tS3£ 



-p-- 



^ 



;e 



i^-^ 



=i^ 



I. Go hand me down my look - ing glass, Go hand me down my comb, And 



/k — d ^ • ^ ^^ F ^ 1 <>' b"- 



:^ 



:^^i 



I 



let me comb lit - tie George's hair For I know he'll nev - er comb mine. 



(«), 



^^^^=^ 



^*JU 



(0 






• # 






103 



No. 23 

Lamkin 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 ( Tonic A ). 
(a) 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 




^ 



-J^^ 



^ 



:i 



1^ 



I. Bold Dun -kins was as fine a ma- son As e - ver was un - der the 
(0 ^ {^) 



:i 



t 



^ 



1^ 




sun, And he built a fine cas - tie And pay he got none. 

(a) 



i 



^ 



(*) 



Si 




(c) Sung thus only once 



^- 



I 



i^ 



Z3t 



^ 



t 



-.Mnut 



2 But bold Dunkins crept in 
By the way of the back door, 
And persuaded the nurse 
To help him get her down. 

3 We'll pick her baby Johnny 
With the silver spade. 

And the blood from the head 
To the foot-board did run. 

4 Bewore, ye fair lady, 

You must come to your dearest one. 

How can I get to him 

At this time of night 

When there's no fire burning, 

Nor no candle alight ? 

5 You've got five golden mantles 
As bright as the sun. 
Bewore, ye fair lady. 

You must come by the light of one. 

6 She was a-coming downstairs 
A-thinking no harm, 

When bold Dunkins was ready 
To take her in his arms. 



104 



Lamkin 

O spare my life, Dunkins, 

Just one half of an hour, 

And you may have as much gold and silver 

As endel in the streets. 



105 



No. 24 

The Maid Freed from the Gallows 

A 



Hexatonic. Mode i, a + b 
(no 6th, mixolydiau influence). 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 
{a) 




I. Hold up your hands and Josh-u - a, he cries, And wait a lit - tie while and 






e^ 



:n=^: 



S 



f— ^ 



:MzzMz 



see. 
(a-) 



w ^. .^ .,. .0. m 

I think I hear my fa- ther dear Come lum-ber-ing here for to see. 




2 O father, O father, have you got any gold for me ? 
Or silver to pay my fee ? 

They say I've stoled a silver cup 
And hanged I must be. 

3 No, daughter, I have got no gold for thee, 
Nor silver to pay your fee ; 

But I've come here to see you hang 
On yon high gallows tree. 

In subsequent verses^ *' mother ^^^ " brother,'''' " sister,^'' a7id finally '■''true love " are 
substituted for '■'father." 

The last verse runs thus : — 

Yes, true love, I have gold for you 
And silver to pay your fee. 
I've come here to win your neck 
From yon high gallows tree. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a -f b 
( mixolydian influence ). 



i 



B 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



4: 



^ 



w^ 



A* 



I. Hold up your hand. 



Josh 
106 



ay, she cried, Wait a 



The Maid Freed from the Gallows 




2 O father, have you any gold for me ? 
Any silver to pay my fee ? 

For I have stoled a golden cup 
And hanging it will be. 

3 No, daughter, no, I have no gold for thee 
Nor silver to pay your fee ; 

For I have come for to see you hang 
All on that willow tree. 



Yes, true love, I have some gold for you 
And silver to pay your fee. 
For I have come for to pay your fee 
And take you home with me. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Orilla Keeton 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 26, 1916 




^ 



ftE 




I. Hang-man,hang-man, spare my life, Just spare my life a mo- ment; I 

-N N 



S3 



it: 



I 



think I hear my fa - ther com- ing A man - y, a man - y a 

2 Father, father, have you gold, 
The gold to set me free, 
Or have you come to see me hung 
Beneath the willow tree ? 
107 



mile. 



The Maid Freed from the Gallows 

3 Daughter, daughter, I have no gold, 
Gold to set you free. 
But I have come to see you hung 
Beneath the willow tree. 



True love, true love, I have the gold, 
Gold to set you free, 
And I shan't come to see you hung 
Beneath the willow tree. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



(^) 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept, 27, 1916 



W 



^ 



I. Hang -man, hang-man, hold your rope, And hold it for a - while; I 



m 



:^ 



think I see my fa - ther com - ing From a long ma - ny mile. 
(a) M (l>) Mrs. Betty Smith's version 



M 



* 



iP3 



2 Father, father, have you any gold ? 
Gold for to set me free ? 

Or have you come to see me hung 
Beneath the gallows tree ? 

3 Son, O son, I have no gold. 
Gold to set you free ; 

I've only come to see you hung 
Beneath the gallows tree. 



Sweetheart, sweetheart, I have gold. 
Gold to set you free, 
And I have not come to see you hung 
Beneath the gallows tree. 

108 



No. 25 



Johnie Scot 



i 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 



fft: 



2^ 



-j»— • 



^^ 



¥ 



=&=^ 



=&=-'-^ 



&i:^=h: 



:t=t 



I. When John - ie Scot saw this big, broad let - ter. It caused him for to 



fm^ 



^^^==t 



smile, 



But the ve - ry first line that he did read, The 



$: 



^ 



^ 



tears run down for a 



while. But the ve - ry first line that 

j g times 



V Last time 



^^^ 



he 



did read, The tears run down for a 



while. 



land. 



2 Away to old England I must go, 
King Edwards has sent for me. 

Up spoke young Jimmy Scot himself 
As he sat by his knees : 
Five hundred of my best brave men 
Shall bear you company. 

3 The very first town that they rode through. 
The drums, the fifes, they played ; 

The very next town that they rode through, 
The drums they beat all around, 

4 They rode, they rode to King Edwards's gate, 
They dingled at the ring ; 

But who did he spy but his own sweetheart 
And her footspade ( footpage ) a-peeping down. 

5 I can't come down, dear Johnny, she says. 
For Poppy has scolded me. 

I'm forced to wear a ball and chain 
Instead of the ivory. 

6 Is this young Jimmy Scot himself. 
Or Jimmy Scotland's king ? 

Or is the father of that bastard child 
From Scotland just come in? 

109 



Johnie Scot 

7 I'm not young Jimmy Scot, 
Nor Jimmy Scotland's king ; 

But I am young Johnie Scot himself 
From Scotland just come in. 

8 There is a taveren in our town 
That's killed more lords than one, 

And before the sun rises tomorrow morning 
A dead man you shall be. 

9 The taveren flew over young Johnie's head 
As swift as any bird ; 

He pierced the taveren to the heart 
With the point of his broad sword. 

lo He whipped King Edwards and all his men, 
And the king he liked to have swung. 
I'll make your girl my gay lady 
And her child the heir of my land. 



no 



No. 26 
Sir Hugh 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 ( no 6th ). 



Sung by Mrs. Swan Sawyer 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



^=4=^ 
-=^(^)- 



t^ 






3. Bu - ry my bi - ble at ray head, My prayer-book at my 



m 



— 5?- 



feet. 



-(^)- 



:^: 



esee^ 



When the schol - ars 



calls for me, Pray 



eI^ 



-<^-j- 



tell 'em I'm 



sleep, Pray tell 'em I'm a - sleep. 



1 All the scholars in the school 
As they are a-playing ball, 

They knocked it high, they knocked it through, 
Through the Jew's garden it flew. 

2 She took him by his lily-white hand 
And she drug him from wall to wall, 
She drug him to a great, deep well, 
Where none could hear his call. 
She placed a penknife to his heart, 
The red blood it did fall. 



Ill 



No. 27 



The Gypsy Laddie 



Heptatonic. Mode i , a + b ( mixolydian ) . 



Sung by Mrs. J. Gabriel Coates 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 1916 



^5^^ 



2_^ 



I. It was late in the night when the squire came home En 



^M 



4^ 



w 



T-~- 



quir 



i 



ing for his 

-^ 4 



la 



=1: 



dy; His 



serv - ant made 



-5f- 



'-M 



dia 



re - ply: She's gone with the gyp - sen 



Da 



vy. 



-^ 



I 



^=±: 



Rat - tie turn a - gyp - sen, gyp - sen, Rat - tie tum a - gyp - sen Da - vy. 

2 O go catch up my milk-white steed, 
He's black and then he's speedy. 
I'll ride all night till broad daylight, 
Or overtake my lady. 

3 He rode and he rode till he came to the town, 
And he rode till he came to Barley. 

The tears came rolling down his cheeks 
And there he spied his lady. 

4 O come, go back, my own true love, 

come, go back, my honey. 

I'll look you up in the chamber so high 
Where the gypsens can't come round you. 

5 I won't come back, your own true love. 
Nor I won't come back, your honey. 

1 wouldn't give a kiss from gypsen"s lips 
For all your land and money. 

6 She soon run through her gay clothing, 
Her velvet shoes and stockings ; 

Her gold ring off her finger was gone 
And the gold plate off her bosom. 

112 



The Gypsy Laddie 

7 O once I had a house and land, 
Feather-bed and money, 
But now I've come to an old straw pad 
With the gypsens all around me. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Norton 
at Rocky Fork, Tenn., Sept. 2, 1916 




gone with the gyp-sy Da - vy, She's gone witli the gyp-sy Da - vy. 



2 Go saddle up my milk-white horse, 
And go saddle up my pony, 

And I will ride both night and day 
Till I overtake my lady. 

3 How can you leave your house and land 
And how can you leave your baby ? 

And how can you leave your kind husband 
To go with the gypsy Davy ? 

4 It's I can leave my house and land 
And I can leave my baby ; 

And I can leave my kind husband 
To go with the gypsy Davy. 

5 Go pull off them high-heeled pvnnps 
That's made of Spanish leather, 
And give me your lily-white hand. 
We'll bid farewell for ever. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a -|- b 
( mixolydian). 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 




:i 



■^- 



:d= 



-t£^ 



'^ 



I. Go catch up my old grey horse, My blan-ket is so speed -y, O; I'll 

113 



The Gypsy Laddie 




:i 



{a) 






ride all night and I'll ride 



all day, Or I'll 
(f) 



o - ver - take my la - dy, O. 




II 



2 It's he caught up his old grey horse, 
His blanket being so speedy, O. 

He rode all night and he rode all day 
And he overtaken of his lady, O. 

3 It's come go back, my dearest dear, 
Come go back, my honey, O ; 
Come go back, my dearest dear. 

And you shall never lack for money, O. 

4 I won't go back, my dearest dear. 
Nor I won't go back, my honey, O. 

For I wouldn't give a kiss from the gypsy's lips 
For the sake of you and your money, O. 

5 It's go pull off those snow-white gloves 
That's made of Spanish leather, O. 
And give me your lily-white hand. 
And bid me farewell for ever, O. 

6 It's she pulled off them snow-white gloves 
That's made of Spanish leather, O, 

And give to him her lily-white hand, 
And bid him farewell- for ever, O. 

7 I once could have had as many fine things, 
Fine feather-beds and money, O. 

But now my bed is made of hay 

And the gypsies a-dancing around me, O. 

8 She soon went through with many fine things. 
Fine rockum (morocco) shoes and stockings, O. 
She soon went through with her finger rings 
And the breast pin off her bosom, O. 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



^^ 



2=l?i: 



I. When Lord Thom - as he came home En - quir - ing for his 

114 



The Gypsy Laddie 



a 



=p 



i=f 



la 



dy, The an - swer that they made to 



him : She's 



--N- 



±L 



^-=^ 



gone with the gyp - sy 



Da 



vy. 



All . 



is — N- 



# 



-A — i- 



&. 



^=i==i^^^=^= 



-4 * 



lip - to tal - ly bo - ney hair, hair, 



::2: 



3=S3EE:EjE^;t^^.=3E^ 



All 



lip - to lad - dy. 



2 It's will you forsake your house and land ? 
And will you forsake your baby ? 

And will you forsake your own wedded lord 
And go with the gypsy Davy ? 

3 I'll forsake my house and land, 
And I'll forsake my baby ; 

And I'll forsake my own wedded lord 
And go with the gypsy Davy. 

4 The night before last I lay on a feather bed, 
Lord Thomas he lay with me. 

Last night I lay on a cold straw bed 

And with the calves a-bawling all around me. 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. KiTTY GwYNNE 
at Rocky Fork, Tenn., Sept. 5, 191 6 



■^9,-0- 



i^± 



:^=:i: 



I. I once had hous - es, rich - es and lands, I once had mon - ey plen - ty ; But 



1^-1^ 



-m —J L^i 



ai — 



-m ^ 



now I've come to an old straw pad And the gyp-sies all a - round me. 



iMd: 



:A— A: 



:i= 



^ — ^ — ^ 



±1 



:a=1: 



>— ^ ^N_j — 4 



^ n^ — d- 



^ 



I 



Rat - tie tum a - gyp - sy, gyp - sy. Rat -tie -turn a-gyp - sy Da - vy. 

lis 



The Gypsy Laddie 
F 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, 
a + b (Ionian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah BucKNtR 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



E33^ 



T- 



r- 



:^ 



-6'-=- 



g 



It's come go back, my pret - ty lit - tie Miss, It's 

. (Z 



^-r- 



come go back, my ho - ney ; It's come go back, my 



Q^ . 


























'7^—f- 


— 1* — 


— P — 


— ^ — 


f 


— — 


F^— 


— N — P- — 


f5> 




4 ' ^ 


- 


-^>— ^ 




— U 


U 


— 1 — 


— ^ — 


— C — 


— • \ 


[_ 






S. "^ 




kJ 



























pret - ty lit - tie Miss, You nev - er shall lack for mon - ey. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, 
a + b ( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 1916 



:j=:=:i= 



Fi^- 



it'lf^^EEJ 



2=t 



^ — 0- 



Then he went un - to the house En - quir - ing for his la - dy ; The 



-\=^\=-- 



m m • — y 1 1 — 



an - swer that she made to him : She's gone with the black - boy 



m 



^-=f- 



I 



E#^i^ 



^ — • 



•zi: 



^-•--# 



Da - vy Ta - de - ra etc. 



116 



No. 28 

Geordie 
A 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b 
(Tonic A). 



Sung by Mr. William F. Wells 
at Swannanoah, N. C, Sept. 9, 1916 



u. 



'm 



a=J: 



;E^E 



:pi2 



I. As I crossed o - ver Lon - don's bridge One morn-ing bright and 






=i=l" 



=P= 



§^ 



-^^g^r=J^ 



:^ 



i^nufc" 



^: 



:tzt^.-Ti:4 



I 



*fc 



ear-ly, I spied a maid for-bide the way La- ment-ing for poor Char-lie. 
( 2D Verse) 



n 



-iN- 



:^ 



:^ 



-N-- 



=1: 



2: 



51=t 



rt: 



2. Char - He was the son 



of a poor man Who was 

{a) 



•=ss 



-^ • 



;2: 



d:^ 



1=: 



lov - ed by a fair la - dy. It's by his own con - fes - sion 



'f='- 



:^= 



-^- 



he must die. May the Lord have mer - cy on him. 



F^iJ^: 



(a) ^(/ Verse 



^^'- 



M= 



-^-i— ^ — * — ii 



.iff4 



TCtl 



-| --J- - ^ S s^- 



I 



3 Charlie never murdered any one. 

He stole sixteen of the king's white staff 
And sold them in Virginee. 

4 The king looked over his right shoulder 
And thus he says to Charlie : 

It's by your own confession you must die. 
May the Lord have mercy on you. 

5 The king looked over his left shoulder 
And thus he says to Charlie : 

It's by your own confession you must die. 
Jinny have mercy on you. 



117 



Geordie 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry , 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1910 



3: 



=^: 



-'5'-^- 



^ 



\^ 



I. As I went 



ver Lon - don's bridge One morn - ing bright and 



•d^?^^?_: 



-t 



;[| 



*^^^ 



gj^^- 



^ 



ear - ly, I saw a maid for - bide the way La-ment-ing for poor Char-lie. 

2 It's Charlie's never robbed the king's high court, 
Nor he's never murdered any, 

But he stole sixteen of his milk-white steeds 
And sold them in old Virginia. 

3 Go saddle me my milk-white steed, 
The brown one ain't so speedy, 

And I'll ride away to the king's high court 
Enquiring for poor Charlie. 

4 She rode, she rode to the king's high court 
Enquiring for poor Charlie. 

Fair lady you have come too late, 
For he's condemned already. 

5 It's Charlie's never robbed the king's high court, 
Nor he's never murdered any, 

But he stole sixteen of his milk-white steeds 
And sold them in old Virginia. 

6 It's will you promise me ? she said, 
O promise me, I beg thee, 

To hang him by a white silk cord 
That never has hung any. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 




B: 



-^-v- 



±. 



#-.^— ^- 



I. She sad-died up her milk-white steed. She rode bright and gai-ly, She 



I 



m. 



:* 



-V — \^- 



V- 



-^ 



—5^" 



rode till she came to the king's high court, La-ment-ing for poor Char-lie. 

118 



No. 29 

The Daemon Lover 
A • 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, 
a + b ( dorian ).* 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. i, 1916 



tr- 



I. If you could have mar 



-\ 



ried the King's daugh - ter dear, You'd 



-Xp=X^ 



bet- ter have mar - ried her, For I've late - ly got^mar - ried to a 



J2=q^i 



f- 



^ 



:^ 



^ 



house-car - pen 

(a) 



ter 



And 



"= "F — Ssrr- 



I'm sure he's 
ic) 



fine young man. 



ii 



m^- 




JKlMut 



literally thus. 



2 If you will forsaken your house-carpenter 
And go along with me, 

I will take you away where the grass grows green 
On the banks of sweet Da Lee. 

3 She picked up her tender little babe 
And give it kisses three. 

Stay here, stay here, my tender little babe, 
And keep your papa company. 

4 She dressed herself as in a yellow rose. 
Most glorious to behold, 

And she walked the streets all round and about. 
And shined like glittering gold. 

5 They had not been on the sea more than two weeks, 
I'm sure it was not three. 

Till she begin to weep and mourn 
. And wept most bitterly. 

6 Are you weeping for your gold ? 
Or are you for your store ? 

Or are you weeping for your house-carpenter 
That you never shall see no more ? 



*If F be tonic : — Mode 3, a -[- b (Ionian). 



119 



The Daemon Lover 

7 I'm neither weeping for my gold, 
Nor neither for my store ; 

I'm weeping about my tender little babe 
I left a-sitting on the floor. 

8 And if I had it's all the gold 
That ever crossed the sea, 

So free would I give it to see land again 
And my tender little babe with me. 

9 If you had all the gold 
You should give it all to me, 

For you shall never see land any more. 
But stay here for ever with me. 

:'o Don't you see yon light cloud arising 
As light as any snow ? 
That's the place called heaven, she says. 
Where all righteous people go. 

11 Don't you see yon dark cloud arising 
As dark as any crow ? 

That's the place called hell, she says, 
Where I and you must go. 

12 They had not been on the sea more than three weeks, 
I'm sure it was not four. 

Till the ship sprung a leak, to the bottom it went. 
And it went to rise no more. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 191 6 




B3 



E 



=E 



P 



met, well met, my old true love, Well met, well met, says he, I've 



m 



53^ 



-J=n> 



re-turned from the salt wa - ter sea And it's all for the sake of thee. 



i 



i 



^ 



2 We've met, we've met, my old true love, 
We've met, we've met, says she, 
I have just married a house-carpenter, 
A nice young man is he. 
120 



The Daemon Lover 

3 If you'll forsake your house-carpenter 
And go along with me, 

I'll take you where the grass grows green 
On the banks of sweet Tennessee. 

4 She picked up her tender little babe 
And kisses give it three. 

Stay here, stay here, my tender little babe, 
And keep your pa company. 

5 They hadn't been a-sailing but about two weeks, 
I'm sure it was not three, 

Till this fair damsel began for to weep. 
She wept most bitterly. 

6 O what are you weeping for, my love ? 
Is it for my gold or store ? 

Or is it for your house-carpenter, 
Whose face you'll see no more ? 

7 I'm neither weeping for your gold. 
Nor neither for your store, 

But I'm weeping for my tender little babe 
Whose face I'll see no more. 

8 What banks, what banks before us now 
As white as any snow ? 

It's the banks of Heaven, my love, she replied, 
Where all good people go. 

9 What banks, what banks before us now 
As black as any crow ? 

It's the banks of hell, my love, he replied. 
Where I and you must go. 

ID They hadn't been sailing but about three weeks, 
I'm sure it was not four. 
Till that fair ship begin for to sink. 
She sank and riz' no more. 



Sung by Mrs. Bishop 
Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. at Clay Co., Kentucky, July 16, 1909 






s 



I. Well met, well met, . . my own . . true love, Well 

121 



The Daemon Lover 






w- 



-T^^ 



pi^ 



:i=J= 



-7^ 



met, well met, says he ; 



O 



from 




eign land, All 



lone for the sake 



2 I could have been married to the Queen's daughter 
And she would a-married me, 

But I've forsaken her and her gold 
All alone for the sake of thee. 

3 If you could have married the Queen's daughter, 
And she would a-married you, 

I'm sure you must be for to blame. 

For I am married to a little house-carpenter, 

And I think him a neat yovmg man. 

4 O will you forsake that house-carpenter 
And go, O go along with me -^ 

And I will take you where the grass grows green 
On the banks of old Willie. 

5 What have you got to maintain me ? 
And what have you got ? says she ; 

O what have you got to maintain me on 
While sailing on the sea ? 

6 Seven vessels all on shore, 
Seven more on sea ; 

And I have got one hundred and ten neat young men 
All alone for to wait on thee. 

7 She dressed herself in finest silk, 

Her baby she kissed, 'twas one, two, three. 
O stay, O stay, O stay at home 
And bear your father company. 

8 She hadn't sailed but a day or two, 
I'm sure it was not three. 

Till she began to weep 
And wept most bitterly. 

9 Are you a-weeping for my gold and my silver ? 
Or are you a-weeping for my store ? 

Or are you a-weeping for that house-carpenter 
That you will never see no more ? 
122 



The Daemon Lover 

10 I'm neither weeping for your gold nor your silver, 
I'm neither weeping for your store ; 

I'm a-weeping for my poor little baby 
That I will never see no more. 

1 1 Cheer up, cheer up, my pretty, fair maid, 
Cheer up, cheer up, cried he, 

For I will take you where the grass grows green 
On the banks of the sweet Willie. 

12 They did not sail but a day or two, 
I'm sure it was not four 

Till the vessel sprung a leak and began to sink, 
And sank for to rise no more. 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mr. Wm. Riley Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 191 6 




I. We've met, we've met, my own 



true 



love, We've 



-P=P 



^ 



met, we've met once more; For I've late - ly crossed this 



^izife? 



S h 



I 



^-- 



salt wa - ter sea And it's all for the sake of 



thee. 



2 It's I could have married the king's daughter dear, 
I'm sure she'd have married me ; 

But I forsaken them crowns of gold, 
And it's all for the sake of thee. 

3 If you could have married the king's daughter dear, 
I'm sure you ought to have married then ; 

For I am married to the house-carpenter, 
I'm sure he's a fine young man. 

4 If you'll forsake your house-carpenter 
And go along with me, 

I'll take you where the grass grows green 
All on the banks of sweet Lillee. 



123 



The Daemon Lover 

5 If I forsake my house-carpenter 
And goes along with thee, 

Pray tell me the wealth you have on board 
To keep me from slavery ? 

6 I have three ships all sailing on the sea, 
All making for dry land, 

And besides three hundred jolly sailor boys, 
You can have them at your command. 

7 She catched her tender little babes in her arms, 
Kisses give them, one, two, three. 

Saying : Stay at home with your papee, 
I'm sure he'll be good to thee. 

8 They hadn't been sailing but a day or two, 
Not more than two or three. 

Till she began to weep and mourn 
And she weep most bitterly. 

9 Are you weeping about my gold, said he ? 
Are you weeping about my stores ? 

Or are you weeping about your house-carpenter 
That you shall never see no more ? 

lo I'm neither weeping for your gold. 
Nor neither for your store ; 
But I am weeping about my tender little babe 
That I never shall see any more. 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a -f b 
( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Sylvaney Ramsey 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 1916 




^^^3^e§^ 



^ 



t- 



I. Well metjWell met, my own true love, It's well met,said he. I've just re 



-<S'-r- 



te:2 



-^ — ^ 



na: 



:_*Z3t 



'■ 4« '-^-z)-. S — #- 

turned from the State of Ten - ne - see. And it's all for the sake of thee. 



I 



2 O who will clothe my little babe. 
And who will shoe its feet, 
And who will sleep in its lily-white arms 
While we're sailing for dry land ? 

124 



The Daemon Lover 

3 Its papa will kiss its little cheek, 
And also shoe its feet, 
And also sleep in its lily-white arms 
While we're sailing for dry land. 

5 She picked up her little babe, 
And kissed it on the cheek. 
She laid it down on a soft bed of down 
And bid it go to sleep. 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( Tonic C. Mixolydian influence ). 



Sung by Mr. Frankland B. Shelton 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 



:4=?F: 



We've met, we've met, my own true love, We've 



^ 



met, we've met once more. I've late - ly crossed the 



5 



H 



-^=^. 



salt wa - ter sea And it's all for the love of 



thee. 



Hexatonic. Mode.4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Tempa Shelton 
at Spillcorn, N. C, Sept. 6, 1916 




?P^ 



Sii^ 



We've met, we've met, my own true love. We've 



::i=a- 



V 



met, we've met once more. I have late - ly . . crossed the 



:i?.:r 



^ 



^ — !• 



:b: 



I 



--^ 



-• — i*- ! -^-^ 



salt wa - ter sea And it's all for the sake of . thee. 

125 



The Daemon Lover 
H 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 



H=^ 



4=t: 



■M^^ 



:E^t 



L=^: 



t^ 



O come you home, my own true love, O come you home from sea? It's 

■^. 1 ST N- 



£ 



-^- 



ii 



^ft=m 



i 



are you mar - ried ? he said. Yes, I 



am mar - ried to a 

^ P^^ 



I 



-i — f- 



i 



w 



=^^^= 



^=i^ 



-^- 



-iS'-^ 



house - car - pen - ter And I think he is a nice young man. 

*The passage between asterisks not repeated in subsequent verses. 



i 



(a) 



-^ — i 1 = 



(a) 



-- 4 ^ d 



S — ^ 



-tii^ 



ib) 



{l>) 



— I (S»-T- 



literally, or 



^^^^^B 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( inixolydian intluence ). 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



i 



"4: 



V- 



Well met, well met, my 



true . love, Well 



i 



?^F 



5 



t!=|5: 



^ 



i 



met, well met, says he. I've just re -turned from the 



^ 



^ ^— ^ 



p^ 



^ 



^ 



salt wa - ter sea And it's all 
{a) 



for the sake of thee. 



#^rni^==^ | 



126 



The Daemon Lover 
J 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Anelize Chandler 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 



g^ 



i=^ 



^ 



We've met, we've met, my 



d2: 



true love, We've 






.t 



-^-i- 



-4 — •- 



met, we've met once more. I've late - ly crossed the 



:^p=i: 



salt wa - ter sea And it's all for the sake of . you. 



K 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b (Ionian). 



Sung by Mrs. Addy Crane 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



SE^^ 



^^^^^ 






^i=ir. 





are you weep - ing for 


my gold, 


Or 


is i 


t for m 

h — ^ — 1 


y store, 

"1 1^^ 


r is it 
1 




4 


^ — --=*—• • — J— 


^ 1 1 

^ — v^ 




—i— • 


— 4 — i 


^*-^\ 




\ 


«. 


y • 


^^^s^' — -4- 




— 











for your house-car - pen - ter Whose face you shall see no more? 



127 



No. 30 



The Grey Cock 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b 
( mixolydian). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 191 6 



i+t^=£S 



:^ 



a: 



m 



1^ 



-#—,»- 



>- 



t 



I. All on one sum-mer's eve-ning when the fe - ver were a-dawn-ing I 

-fS 1 : , S^ — r [N ^ - 



^¥- 



/!==# 



1^ 



^ 



^ 



i 



heard a fair maid make a mourn. She was a-weep-ing for her fa - ther and a - 



i 



1^=^ 



:^^=|!c 



:^ 



W^- 



-t^-^-i- 



• ^ • "-s»- 

griev-ing for her moth-er, And a - thinking all on her true love John. At 



^ 



last John - ny came and he found the doors all shut, And he 



S 



^^ 



^ 



• _ ^ ^ 



ding - led so low at the ring. Then this fair maid she rose and she 






^ 



^ 



hur - ried on her clothes To make haste to let John - ny come in. 



2 All around the waist he caught her and unto the bed he brought her, 
And they lay there a-talking awhile. 

She says : O you feathered fowls, you pretty feathered fowls, 
Don't you crow till 'tis almost day. 
And your comb it shall be of the pure ivory 
And your wings of the bright silveree (or silver grey). 
But him a-being young, he crowed very soon, 
He crowed two long hours before day ; 

And she sent her love away, for she thought 'twas almost day, 
And 'twas all by the light of the moon. 

128 



The Grey Cock 

It's when will you be back, dear Johnny, 

When will you be back to see me ? 

When the seventh moon is done and passed and shines on yonder lea, 

And you know that will never be. 

What a foolish girl was I when I thought he was as true 

As the rocks that grow to the ground ; 

But since I do find he has altered in his mind, 

It's better to live single than bound. 



129 



No. 31 

The Suffolk Miracle 



A 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
(mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 




:^=± 



-i^*- 



^: 



I. Come you peo -pie old and young, Pray don't do as I have done; Pray 



::& 



m 



m 



s 



I^ 



^z^ 



let your child - ren have their way For fear that love breeds a de - cay. 



2 When her old father came this to know 
That she did love young Villian so, 

He sent her off three hundred miles or more. 

And swore that back home she should come no more. 

3 This young man wept, this young man cried, 
In about six months for love he died ; 
Although he had not been twelve months dead 
Until he rode a milk-white steed. 

4 He rode up to his uncle's home 
And for his true love he did call. 

5 Here's your mother's coat and your father's steed ; 
I've come for you in great speed. 

And her old uncle, as he understood, 
He hoped it might be for her good. 

6 He jumped up, and her behind. 
And they rode faster than the wind ; 
And when he got near her father's gate 
He did complain that his head did ache. 

7 A handkerchief she pulled out 

And around his head she tied it about, 
And kissed his lips and thus did say : 
My dear, you're colder than the clay. 

8 Get down, get down, get down, says he, 
Till I go put this steed away. 

While she was knocking at the door 
The sight of him she saw no more. 



130 



The Suffolk Miracle 

9 Get up, get up, get up, says he, 

You're welcome home, dear child, says he, 
You're welcome home, dear child, says he, 
What trusty friend did come with thee ? 

10 Dear old father, do you know, 
The one that I once loved before. 

The old man knowing he had been twelve months dead 
It made the hair rise on his head. 

1 1 He summoned clerks and clergies too. 
The grave was to open and him to view. 
Although he had been twelve months dead 
The handkerchief was around his head. 

12 Come all of ye, both young and old, 
Who love your children better than gold, 
And always let them have their way 
For fear that love might prey (?) decay. 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a -(- b 
(mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff .Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., .Sept. 4, 1916 




I. Sing court - 


ing, court 


■ ing, courting C2\n{sic) 
{a) 


,But 


all 


the court - ships 


Vrr 


^r^ 


^ 


P m 


_ 




"^ 1 


/ m ^ [" 'C 




p 


p ' 




\(\ \ 1 


! r 






' • m 


Li.1 1 \ \ 


^ 


^ 


1 


V -■ 



as her 




came to know, They sent her three hun - dred miles or more. 




2 It's first they vowed and then they swore 
Back home she should not come no more. 
This young man was taken sad, 
No kind of news could make him glad. 
His day had come, his hour had passed, 
Unto his grave he must go at last. 

131 



The Suffolk Miracle 

3 Although he has twelve months been dead 
He arose and rode this milk-white steed. 
Your mother's cloak, your father's steed, 
My love, I've come for you with great speed. 

4 They rode more swifter than the wind. 
At last, at last, three hours or more. 
At last, at last, three hours or more, 
He sot her at her father's door. 

5 Just as they got within the gate, 
He did complain his head did ache. 

She drew her handkerchief from around her neck 
AvA bound it round her lover's head. 

6 She reached around to kiss his lips. 

She says : My love, you're colder than the clay. 

When we get home some fire we'll have ; 

But little did she know he'd come from the grave. 

7 Go in, go in, my love, go in, 
Till I go put this steed away. 

Her knocking at her father's door — 
The sight of her love she saw no more. 

8 This old man arose, come putting on his clothes, 
Saying : You're welcome home, dear child, to me ; 
You're welcome home, dear child, to me. 

What trusty friend did come with thee ? 

9 Did you not send one I did adore, 

I loved so dear, could love no more ? 

Him a-knowing he had twelve months been dead, 

It made the hair rise on the old man's head. 

ID The very next morning this was to do, 
This young man raise and him to view. 
Although he had twelve months been dead. 
The handkerchief was around his head. 

1 1 Come parents all, both old and young, 

Your children love more precious than gold. 
For in love let them have their way, 
For love brings many to their grave. 



132 



The Suffolk Miracle 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian). 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. i6, 1916 



^ 



Here's your moth - er's cloak and your fa - ther's steed, I'' 



've 



^- 



3t=t 






■ 2-^~ 



:f^=4^ 



J=Z-jtL 



-PS N- 



come for you with - in great speed. And when her old un - cle to 






-^^ 



this he un - der- stood, He hoped it might be for her good. 






-4- 



=-j=^-i 



=t 



133 



No. 32 

Our Goodman 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 (no 6th). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 16, 1916 



i 



&3 



6# 



Epa 



-<s^ 



I. She beats me, she bangs me, it is her heart's de - light To 



-751- 



beat me with the pok - ing stick when I come home at night. 



m^ 



?3 



si- 



2. Old wo - man, old wo - man, what means all of this? 



^^ 



&=:i= 



# 



Hors - es in the sta - bles where my mules ought to be. 



-fN 1 



1^^ 



-25l- 



-^^- 



You old 



fool, you blind fool, it's fool, can't you 



^^- 



:=1: 



-TT^ 



^-\ 



see? It's noth-ing but some milk - cows your mam -my sent to me. 



i 



^ 



-f^- 



-^ — 



-<5'-r- 



Miles 

n 1 


I 


have tra 


- veiled. 


Ten 


tho 


a - sand miles or 


more, 

A/ Segno 


V , 1 1 1 


1 


1 1 1 


^ 


, 


I 


/.[h Jill 


m ! 






• 


1 


((^^ ^ 


m 




sJ 


' 


9 


m m m ' * 




\ • 


1 


\-J mm 


1 


• • • 


rj . 


1 


*J 








' 













Sad - dies on a milk - cow I nev - er saw be - fore. 

3 Old woman, etc. 

Boots on the floor where my boots ought to be. 

You old fool, etc. 

It's nothing but a churn, sir, your mammy sent to me. 

Miles I have travelled, etc. 

Heels on a churn, sir, I never saw before. 



134 



Our Goodman 

4. Old woman, etc. 

A hat on a table where my hat ought to be. 

You old fool, etc. 

It's nothing but a nightcap your mammy sent to me. 

Miles I have travelled, etc. 

Fur round a nightcap I never saw before. 

5 Old woman, etc. 

A man in the bed where I ought to be. 

You old fool, etc. 

It's nothing but a baby your mammy sent to me. 

Miles I have travelled, etc. 

Hair on a baby's face I never saw before. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. ToM Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 18, 1916 



-^-. 



-f^-!- 



=t==f:: 



>a~r: 



X^ 



-V L- 



I. Whose horse is that horse, where my horse ought to be? You 



-x^ 



X-- 



£ 



old fool, you blind fool, can't you ne - ver see? It's 



:^: 



no - thing but a milk - cow my mo - ther sent to me. It's 




=^= 



It: 



ii 



:p 



miles I have tra - veiled, some for - ty miles or more, 



A 



F=^-- 



:^=d: 



-^- 



I 



milk - cow with a sad - die on I ne - ver saw be - fore. 



2 Whose coat is that coat where my coat ought to be ? 
You old fool, etc. 
It's nothing but a bed-quilt my mother sent to me. 

It's miles, etc. 
A bed-quilt with buttons on I never saw before. 

135 



Our Goodman 

3 Whose boots is those boots where my boots ought to be ? 
It's nothing but a cabbage head my mother sent to me. 
A cabbage head with boot heels on I never saw before. 

4 Whose hat is that hat where my hat ought to be ? 
It's nothing but a dish rag my mother sent to me. 
A dish rag with a hat band on I never saw before. 

5 Whose pants are those pants where my pants ought to be ? 
It's nothing but a petticoat my mother sent to me. 

A petticoat with a gallices (suspenders) on I never saw before. 

6 Who's that in the bed where I ought to be ? 

It's nothing but a baby child my mother sent to me. 

A baby child with mushtash (moustachios) on I never saw before. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, b (no 6tli). 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 1916 



|2=l: 



2zi 



^ — r 



You old fool, you blind fool, You are blind and can - not see ! It's 



i 



si-^ 



no - thing but a milk - ing cow My mo - ther sent to me. I've 



r^r-r 






N— 




1 \ \ \ M 


1 


^ 


s 1 


/T W J 


* 


m 








1 ' 1 ' 1 


rh^ 1 1 ! J* 


1 ' ' ' 


« ' ' ^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 1 


V-W—M- 


9 


• • 






— ^ 


• 













<5> . w . , 



tra- veiled miles, and ma - ny miles, Ten thou - sand miles or more. And a 



7 It 1 "1 d m F F~ \ — i J J 1 \ 1 


— 1 


4^^J — J — ^— — --r — r — J — '~'^ — ^ — • — • — ^- 


=JJ 



milk - cow with a sad - die on I ne - ver saw be - fore. 



136 



No. 33 



i 



The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin 

A 

Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 1916 

I 



fi: 



ii: 



:i 



^ 



:i 



d: 



I. There was an old man 



he had 



wife, 



Dan 



doo, 



dan 



doo, There was 



old man 



he 



had 



wife, 



-^^. 



Cling -a - ma clang- a - ma clear - o, . . There was an old man he 



F^i: 



m 



a 



:^: 



^ 



S 



had 



a wife, And she 



plagued him out of his life. To 



I 



^ 



my kum lam, slam, dam, clear -y - o. 



Jimmy go. 



2 When this old man came in from plough. 
Says : Have you got my breakfast now ? 

3 She says : There's a piece of bread upon the shelf ; 
If that don't do, go bake it yourself. 

4 This old man went out to his sheep-pen, 
And soon had off an old wether's skin, 

5 He placed it on his old wife's back. 
And with two sticks went wickety whack. 

6 I'll tell your daddy and mammy and all your kin, 
How you tanned your wether's skin. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 (no 2nd). 



Sung by Miss Mary Large 
at Lee Co., Ky., June, 1916 




^m 



-<si- 



I. There was a man lived in the West, Dan du, dan du, There 

137 



The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin 



i 



;^Ef 



P 



was a man lived in the West, Dan du, dan du - ah, There 



t=p-- 



:i 



^^5 



-^. 



* — ; — ^ 



was a man Hved in the West, Who had a wife that was 



-0 ^ 



::i=^: 



• ^ 



:i 



:i 



H 



none of the best, Ram yam gil - li - am, dan du - ah. 



2 She put a cold slice on the shelf : 

If you want any more you can get it yourself. 

3 The man went out to his sheep-fold, 
And caught the wether tough and old. 

4 He threw the skin round his wife's back, 
And that old sheep's hide he did whack. 

5 The wife cried out unto her kin : 
He's beating me on my bare skin. 

6 The man he grinned and he replied : 
I'm only tanning my old sheep's hide. 



138 



^ No. 34 

The Fanner's Curst Wife 
A 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 
. iL First Verse 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



^: 



:t 



>z&. 



^ 



I. There was an old man who fol - lowed the plough, Sing 



n. 



-S=j: 



S: 



hal - i - for band if 



do, Sing bands and reb - els, and 



i 



;|] 



i 



w- 



1^^ 




reb - els and trou - bles, 
(a) Verses 2-7 AND 9-1 1. 



Sing 



new, 



^ 



^EE3 



2. He drove 



ens and 



old cow. Sing 



--N- 



^ 



hS: 



— N- 



fi 



s 



nick 



el, 



sing 



nack 



el, 



sing 



new, 



Sing 



;0 



mz 



-^-^ 



ti&^iz 



bands and reb - els, and reb - els 
„ Verses 8, 12, 13 and 14. 


and trou 


-bles 


, Sing new, new. 


\ 


Vtr • 


m A 


s 


^ 1 N 


N 1 


7 1 


1 1 • • 




N K. 


^ 


• 


J^ 


fc\ \j 




J 


N 


.■v 


m m m \ 


\s) / 


L-J < 1 ^-J 




• ^ 


-^ 





8. He picked her up all on his back, And a - way he went to old 



5 



8: 



tarn - pie shack, Sing hal - i - for band if I 



do. Sing 



:t 



bands and reb - els, and reb - els and trou - bles. Sing new, new. 

3 His wife she had ten hens in the lot, 
Sing halifor band if I do, 

Sing bands and rebels, and rebels and troubles, 
Sing new, new. 

139 



The Farmer's Curst Wife 

4 And every day had one in the pot, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

5 He prayed for the devil to come get them all, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

6 One day the old devil he come, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

}r Says: Now, old man, I've come after your wife, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

8 He picked her up all on his back, 

. And away he went to old tample {or temple) shack. 
Sing halifor, etc. 

9 He took her down unto his den, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

ID Where he had bells, blubs, blinds and chains, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

1 1 She picked up the axe and mauled out his brains, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

12 He picked her up all on his back. 
And away he went to old tample shack, 
Sing halifor, etc. 

13 Says : Here, old man, you may have your wife. 
She's almost plagued me out of my life. 

Sing halifor, etc. 

14 And now you see what women can do. 
They can conquer men and the devil too, 
Sing halifor, etc. 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



B 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm ' 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 191 6 



ib) 



* 



^ 



I. There was 



old 



man lived un - der the hill, Sing 



^ 



tet 



* 



—^ ^ *^ 

ti - ro rat - tie - ing day. If he ain't moved a - way he's 

140 



The Farmer's Curst Wife 




^-- 



:^ 



I 



-A- 



=1: 



ing there still, Sing ti 

^1^ (^) 




ro rat - tie - ing day. 



^gfeJfe ': 



I 



2 This old man went out to his plough, 
To see the old devil fly over his mow. 

3 The old man cries out : I am undone, 
For the devil has come for my oldest son. 

4 It's not your oldest son I want, 

But your damned old scolding wife I'll have. 

5 He took the o^d woman upon his back, 
And off he went with her packed in a sack. 

6 He packed her back in one comer of hell. 
Saying : I hope the old devil will use you well. 

7 Twelve little devils came walking by, 

Then she up with her foot and kicked eleven in the fire. 

8 The odd little devil peeped over the wall, 

Saying ; Take her back, daddy, or she will kill us all. 

9 She was six months going and eight coming back, 
And she called for the mush she left in the pot, 

10 The old man lay sick in the bed. 

With an old pewter pipe she battered his head. 

11 The old man cries out: I am to be cursed. 
She has been to hell and come back worse. 



141 



No. 35 



The Golden Vanity 
A 



Heptatonic. Mode, 4, 
a + b (dorian ).* 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 




=N— ^- 



-^- 



I. There was 



tie ship in the South A- mer 



i - kee That 




2 There was another ship in the North Amerikee, 
She went by the name of the Golden Silveree, 
As she sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 

3 O captain, O captain, what'U you give to me, 

If I'll go and sink the ship of the Weeping Willow Tree, 
As she sailed upon the low-de-lands deep ? 

4 I will give you gold and I'll give to you a fee, 
Give to you my daughter and married you shall be, 
As we sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 

5 He bent to his breast and away swum he, 

He swum and he sunk the ship of the Weeping Willow Tree, 
As they sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 

6 He bent to his breast and back swum he, 
Back to the ship of the Golden Silveree, 
As they sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 

7 O captain, O captain, pray take me on my board, 
For I have been just as good as my word, 

I sunk her in the low-de-lands deep. 



• If A be tonic — Mode i , a -|- b ( mixolydian ) . 



142 



The Golden Vanity 

8 I know that you've been just as good as your word, 
But never more will I take you on board, 

As we sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 

9 If it wasn't for the love that I have for your girl, 
I'd do unto you as I did unto them, 

I'd sink you in the low-de-lands deep. 

lo But he turned upon his back and down went he, 
Down, down, down to the bottom of the sea, 
As they sailed upon the low-de-lands deep. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 1916 



1 p,.> 1 


1 1 I 1 


c 


1 — ^ \ \ \ 1 


/ b'^ 


J J 


fy p 




-M¥^^ — 


-^ ^ • — 


1 1 


_J — J d d 


»j 




' — 1 1 1 





I. There was a lit - tie ship in the North A - mer - i 



-f^-r- 



^^Z 



-f^- 



^-^- 



d: 



kee, She went by the name of the Gol - den Wil - low 



i 



5 



3 



^ 



E# 



-Z5l- 



& 

lands 



i 



Tree, As she sailed 
Verses 5, 6 and 9. 



the 



Low 



low. 



5 



-42- 



:t=t: 



:[=:: 



te 



-25l- 



^ ^ 



^9-^ 



w. 



:i 



-TTi- 



2 There was another ship in the South Amerikee, 
She went by the name of the Turkey Silveree, 
As she sailed in the Lowlands low. 

3 O captain, O captain, what will you give to me 
To sink the ship of the Golden Willow Tree, 
As she sails in the Lowlands low ? 

143 



^-s^- 



The Golden Vanity 

4 I will give you gold, I will give you fee, 

I'll give you my daughter and a-married you shall be, 
If you sink her in the Lowlands low. 

5 He turned on his back and away swam he, 
Crying : O this lowland lies so low. 

He turned on his breast and away swam he, 
- He swam till he came to the Golden Willow Tree, 
As she sailed on the Lowlands low. 

6 He turned on his back and away swam he, 
Crying : O this Lowland lies so low. 

He turned on his breast and away swam he. 
He swam till he came to the Turkey Silveree, 
As she sailed on the Lowlands low^. 

7 O captain, O captain, pray take me on board. 
For I have been just as good as my word, 

I have sunk her in the Lowlands low. 

.8 I know you have been just as good as your word. 
But never no more will I take you on board, 
While I sail on the Lowlands low. 

9 He turned on his back and down swum he, 
Crying : O this Lowland lies so low. 
He turned on his breast and down swam he, 
He sank before he came to the Turkey Silveree, 
Till she sailed on the Lowlands low. 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 




Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 191 6 



:t 



-^ 



I-S 






Some were wav - ing hats and some were wa - ving caps, 

'is ^^ ^ "* ^^ ^^ "' 1 — r— N- 



t^ 




Some a - try - ing to stop 



1^ 



them salt - y 



wa - ter gaps As she 



3S 



4=t 



•s^- 



sailed on the Low-lands low, As she sailed on the lone - some sea. 

(^a) Literally thus. j, (^) 

-M d •-^ d ^ J — 




144 



No. 36 

The Brown Girl 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 3i, 1916 




33 



Tt* 



i 



I. There was a rich la - dy, from Eng - land she came, Fine Sal - ly, fine 



a 



=1= 



=^ 



'^ 



£ 



3ti±i 



Sal - ly, fine Sal - ly by name,And she had more mo - ney . than the 




^if: 



^tfc 



i3: 



I 



king could pos-sess,And her wit and her beau - ty was worth all the rest. 



q^= 



2 There was a poor doctor who lived hard by, 
And on this fair damsel he cast his eye. 
Fine Sally, fine Sally, fine Sally, says he, 

Can you tell me the reason our love can't agree ? 
I don't hate you, Billy, nor no other man. 
But to tell you I love you I never can. 

3 Fine Sally took sick and she knew not for why. 

And she sent for this young man that she was to deny. 
He says : Am I the doctor that you have sent for. 
Or am I the young man that you once did deny ? 
Yes, you are the doctor can kill or can cure 
And without your assistance I'm ruined, I'm sure. 

4 Fine Sally, fine Sally, fine Sally, says he, 
Don't you remember when you slighted me ? 
You slighted me highly, you used me with scorn. 
And now I reward you for what's passed and gone. 

5 What's passed and gone, love, forget and forgive. 
And spare me a while longer in this wide world to live. 
I don't want you, Sally, in the durance of my breath. 

But I'll dance on your grave when you're laid in the earth. 

145 



The Brown Girl 

6 Off from her fingers pulled diamond rings three. 

Here, take these rings and wear them when you're dancing on me, 
Then fly from your colour and be no more seen 
When you have done dancing on Sally your queen. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 1916 




It 



I. Fine Sal 



fine Sal - ly, fine Sal - ly, said he, 



It's 



J- 



£ 



£ 



±±t 



don't you re - mem - her when I court - ed thee ? I court- ed you for 

(a) 




love, you de-nied me with scorn, And now I '11 re- ward you for things past and gone. 



• • — F — ,-, 



i 



2 For things past and gone, love, forget and forgive, 
And grant me a little longer on this earth to live. 

I never will forgive you in the durance of my breath, 

And I'll dance on your grave when you're lying in the earth. 

3 Then off her fingers pulled diamond rings three. 

Says : O wear these for my sake when you're dancing on me, 
And fly from your colours and be no more seen 
When you're done dancing on Sally your queen. 

4 Farewell to old father and old father's friends. 
Farewell to this young man. God make him amends 
Farewell to this whole world and all 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



:i 



■^ 



Sung by Mr. Mitchell Wallin 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 191 6 



p2#E3E3 



I. There was 



rich 



la 



dy 



from Lon - don 



she 



146 



The Brown Girl 



i 



m^ 



came, And Sal - ly, sweet Sal 



ly, fair Sal - ly 

3 



by 



S— (2- 



^-- 



ti—H 



name. She were wound - ed in love, she knew . . not 



for 



M 



Id: 



'B 



:t=U: 



why. She sent out to the young man she ^used to de 



ny. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mr. Wm.'Riley Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 1916 



pain that tor - ments me, love. Lies 



my breast. 



r^Tn — \ — 1 




~ 1 k ». 


— \ 


1 


yr kfi 1 


; 


s 


^ 


p 


1 


i-\ 


i-\ 






_• . _ •_ 


1 


1 




t 


> /I ' 


i 




'^ \ 1 


—<&- 


^ 




) '^ » 






• 


m 


« 


1 1 


«. 


It's V 

f) 1 


/here 


does 


y^our 


pain 


lie?D 


oes 


jt 


lie 


in your side 


:? 






V, 






k. k. 


I 




V 


f U ! 


^ 




f 


1 




nr 






m 


• 


^ 


___ m 




im" • 1 




^ 1 


r i 


\A) ' I 1 


\ 


• 


# 


m 


i 1 




1 




». 


J 

where 

n 


does 


your 


pain 


lie.? 


Does 


it 


lie 




in 


your head ? 


The 






V , 












— 


1 1 


1 : 


J 


< u * 


1 


1 


1 


1 




P 


1 ! I 


1 


m 




f^^'' ' 1 11' 1 i , i , 


V' 




• 


• 










K 










w 


^ 




£M 1 1 


«. 


pain 


that 


tor - 1 


nents 


me. 


love. 


I 


sure - 


ly 


con - fess. 


The 




L/ . ^ ^ 




1 ' 1 


, g 


V 


T h . 


^ 


« 






^ 


^ 






) 


1 


ir^'' 1 1 i 


1 1 ! 


• J J 


1 







* 4 4 


<^ \ 



Heptatonic. Mode i, 
a -1- b ( mixolydian ) , 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



# 



*^-i — r 



^zzt 



i^ 



Are you the doc - tor they sent 



^W- 



^: 



-:X 



for me here ? Or are you the young 



-251- 



=^= 



=^= 



£ 



man that I loved so dear? 

{a) 



Or are you the doc - tor can 



"^ 



l=P= 



i 



V- 



-^ 



kill or can cure ?With - out your as 

{a) 



sis-tance I'm ru - ined, I'm sure. 



^=^ 



147 



Sung by Mrs. Moore, Rabun Co., Ga., 
May 2, 1909. (Tune not noted.) 

1 There was a young doctor, from London he came, 
He courted a damsel called Sarah by name. 

Her wealth it was more than the king could possess ; 
Her beauty it was more than her wealth at the best. 

2 O Sarah, O Sarah, O Sarah, said he, 
I am truly sorry that we can't agree, 
But if your heart don't turn unto love, 

I fear that your beauty my ruin will prove. 

3 O no, I don't hate you, and no other man, 
But to say that I like you is more than I can. 
So now you may stop with all your discourse. 
For I never 'low to have you unless I am forced. 

4 After twenty-eight weeks had done gone and passed, 
The beautiful damsel she fell sick at last. 

She sent for the young man she once did deny, 
For to come and see her before she did die. 

5 Am I the young man that you sent for here ? 
Or am I the young man that you loved so dear ? 
You're the only young doctor can kill or can cure. 
And without your assistance I'm ruined, I'm sure. 

6 O Sarah, O Sarah, O Sarah, said he, 
Don't you remember you once slighted me ? 

You slighted, deviled me, you slighted me with scorn, 
And now I'll reward you for things past and gone. 

7 Forget and forgive, O lover, said she. 

And grant me some longer a time for to live. 

O no, I won't, Sarah, enduring your breath, 

But I'll dance on your grave when you lay in cold death. 

8 Gold rings off her finger ends she pulled three, 

Saying : Take these and wear them when you dance on me. 
Ten thousand times over my folly I see. 

9 Now pretty Sarah is dead, as we all may suppose. 
To some other rich lady willed all her fine clothes. 
At last she made her bed in the wet. and cold clay ; 
Her red, rosy cheeks is moulderin' away. 



148 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a, 



No. 37 

The Trooper and the Maid 
A 

Sung by Mrs. ToM Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 18, 1916 



:jzz=: n-H =^-j 

-J — •— ^ — I K-H 






5 



IF 



=F= 






I. Feed your horse we're a - ble. Here's oats and corn for you,young man, To 

' — :^ ___! ^ — 



d: 



:^f= 



d: 



feed your horse we'.e 



ble. 2. She took him by his 



li - ly- white hand. And led him 



to 



the 



ta 



ble. Here's 




cakes and wines for you, young man, Eat and drink we're 



3 She pulled off her lily-white gown 
And laid it on the table. 

The soldier off with his viniform 
And into the bed with the lady. 

4 They hadn't been laying in bed but one hour 
When he heard the trumpet sound. 

She cried out with a thrilling cry : 
O Lord, O Lord, I'm ruined. 



ble. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, b. 



Sung by Mr. T. JefF Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 



#==1^= 



-4^^— « 



d: 



^- 



Jtrjt: 



t: 



I. Here's cakes and wines for you, young man, To eat and drink we're 

(a) 






-i9- 



#=•: 



:1=:^ 



Jtjt 



m 



ble. Here's cakes and wines for you,youngman,To eat and drink we're 

3 3 -, 



m 



sas 






Id: 



,=d: 



=d: 

_^ « ' — ■- 

ble. Yes, we're a 



d: 



-<$'-=- 



ble, 



-s^- 



-\^ 



a 



ble, Here's 



149 



m 



The Trooper and the Maid 



^ 



^ 



r* 



=t 



ZtZit 



cakes and wines for you, young man, To eat and drink we're a - ble. 
(a) ^ (a) Last verse 




=n= 



l=^= 



:P=+ 



I 



:i 



2 He pulled off his shoe-boot clothes 
As he rose from the table, 

He pulled off his shoe-boot clothes 
And into the arms of the lady. 
Yes, the lady, the lady, 
He pulled off his shoe-boot clothes 
And into the arms of the lady. 

3 The trumpet now is sounding. 
And I must go and leave you. 

O soldier, my dear, don't you leave me here, 

For if you do I'm ruined for ever. 

Yes, for ever, for ever, 

O soldier, my dear, don't you leave me here. 

For if you do I'm ruined for ever. 

4 O when will you come back, my love, 
Or when will we get married ? 
When conk-shells turn to silver bells, 
O then, my love, we'll marry. 

Yes, we'll marry, we'll marry, 

When conk-shells turn to silver bells, 

O then, my love, we'll marry. 



ISO 



No. 38 

In Seaport Town 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, b (no 6th). 



Sung by Miss Stella Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 




-(2- 



I. In 


Sea - port 

1 


towr 


I there lived a 


mer - chant, He had three 


^ utr (n . 


P ^ 1 






r r> 


'7 If 1 




! 


1^ ' m P A 1 




\(\^ L/ 1/ "■ • 


1 II*' 


«< • x" y^ d 4 4 


Vl. > 1 V \f 


\i J 






J 













sons and a daugh-ter dear, And a-mong them all was the pret - ti - est 




boy, . 



He was the 



daugh 



ter's dear - est dear. 



2 One evening late they were in the room courting. 
Her oldest brother perchance did hear ; 

He went and told his other brothers : 
Let's deprive her of her dearest dear. 

3 They rose up early the next morning, 
A game of hunting for to go ; 

And upon this young man they both insisted 
For him to go along with them. 

4 They wandered over the hills and mountains 
And through a many of a place unknown. 
Till at last they came to a lonesome valley 
And there they killed him dead alone. 

5 When they return back the next evening, 
Their sister ask for the servant man. 
Saying : We lost him on a game of hunting ; 
No more of him it's could we find. 

6 While she lie on her bedside slumbering. 
The servant man did appear to her, 

Saying : Your brother killed me rough and cruel 
All wallowed in a score of blood. 

7 She rose up early the next morning ; 
She dressed herself in a rich array. 
Saying : I'll go and find my best beloved 
All wallowed in a score of blood. 



151 



In Seaport Town 

8 She wandered over the hills and mountains 
And through a many of a place unknown, 
Till at last she came to the lonesome valley, 
And there she found him dead alone. 

9 Saying : Your eyes look like some bloody butcher, 
Your eyes look like some salt or brine. 

She kissed his cold, cold lips and, crying, 

Said : You are the darling bosom friend of mine. 

10 Since my brothers been so cruel 
As to force your sweet love away, 

One grave shall preserve us both together, 
As long as I have breath I will stay with you. 

11 When she return back the next evening. 
Her brothers ask her where she'd been. 

O hold your tongue, you deceitful villains. 
For one alone you both shall hang, 

12 Her brothers then they came convicted 
To jump in a boat and a-finally leave. 

The wind did blow and the waves came o'er them ; 
They made their graves in the deep blue sea 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b. 



Sung by Mrs. Gosnell 
at AUanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 1916 




=F=- 



-^ 



r- 



In Sea - port town there lived a mer - chant, He had two 



-V — y- 



:t: 



sons and adaugh-ter fair; The pret - ti - est boy who hved a 



;h 



3 



-TZ>r- 



=t 



round there, He was this daugh - ter's dear - est dear. 

G 

Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 




V- 



£ 



:± 



-^-- 



In Bos - ton town there lived a mer - chant, Who had two 

152 



In Seaport Town 



-^*.- 



-1^- 

£[== 



H j- 



^^J- 



and a daugh - ter . fair ; And a - mongst them 
{a) . 



-?^- 



--fv- 



-wi ^ 



:4: 



i— :e=^=?=i 



P=1=i:| 



all was the pret - ti - est boy, Who was the daugh - ter's dear- est dear. 
(a) 



a 



L^Hi m- 



d: 



S 



;l 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a -|- b 
( mixolydian '. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 191 6 



-3- 



— (=2- 



1^: 



-t^ 



:t: 



:t= 



:p==t: 



*? 



In Sea - port town there was a mer - chant, He had two 

(a) 



^=P- 



-f- 



3 



sons and a daugh - ter dear; A-mong them were a prin - cy 



m 



I 



:|< 



-2^ 



boy, . Who was their daugh - ter's dear - est dear. 






i=H 



in^ii 



153 



No. 39 

The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 16, 1916 



-4z 



I. O Pol - ly, O Pol - ly, if you will a - gree, If you will a - 



-X 



--=1= 



:=l: 



^^^EB 



—(S/-. m — 



=t== 



gree and get mar - ried to me. O Wil - Ham, O Wil - Ham, that 



i: 



::^=fc^: 



=1: 



:rf:± 



ne - ver will do, For I am too young to get mar • ried to you. 

2 O Polly, O Polly, if you will agree, 

It's I have a friend that we will go and see. 
He led her over mountains and valleys so deep, 
Till at length pretty Polly began for to weep. 

3 O William, O William, you're leading me astray 
On purpose my innocent heart to betray. 

Polly, O Polly, I guess you spoke right, 

1 were digging your grave the best part of last night. 

4 She fold her arms around him without any fear. 

How can you bear to kill the girl that loves you so dear ? 

Polly, O Polly, we've no time to stand. 

And instantly drew a short knife in his hand. 

5 He opened her bosom all whiter than snow, 
He pierced her heart and the blood it did flow, 
And into the grave her fair body did throw. 
He covered her up and away did go. 

He left nothing but small birds to make their sad mourn. 

6 He entered his ship all upon the salt sea so wide, 
And swore by his Maker he'd sail to the other side. 
Whilst he was sailing on in his full heart's content, 
The ship sprung a leak and to the bottom she went. 

7 Whilst he was lying there all in his sad surprise, 
He saw pretty Polly all in a gore of blood. 

O William, O William, you've no time to stay, 
There's a debt to the devil that you're bound to pay. 

154 



The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b 
( with sharpened 7th ). 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 




I. In Lon - don sweet ci - ty a fair dam - sel did dwell, Her 



m. 



^^^ 



:± 



¥ 



:t 



wealth and her beau - ty no tongue could I tell. She 




2 He says : My Miss Mary, if you will agree, 
If you will consent and go along with me, 

I will ease you from trouble or sorrow and fear, 
If you will but marry a ship's carpenter. 

3 Through 'braces and kisses they parted that night. 
She started next morning for to meet him by light. 
He led her through ditches and valleys so deep. 
Till at length this fair damsel begin for to weep. 

4 She says : My sweet William, you've led me astray 
On purpose my innocent life to betray. 

He says : My Miss Mary, you have guessed right, 

For I was digging your grave all last night. 

She turned her head and her grave she there spied, 

Saying : Is this the bright bed for which me you've provide ? 

5 O pardon, sweet William, and spare me my life. 
Let me go distressed if I can't be your wife. 

For pardon sweet William is the worst of all men, 

For the Heavens will reward you when I am dead and gone. 

155 



The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 

6 No time for to weep nor no time for to stand 
He instantly taken his knife m his hand 
Into her bright body his knife he there stole, 

And the blood from her body like a fountain did fiow. 

7 He covered her all up, straight home he returned, 
Left no one to mourn but the small birds alone, 

And pled forth the paymount for to plough the whole sea. 

8 The captain then summoned his whole-y ship crew. 
He said : My brave boys, I'm afraid some of you 
Have murdered some damsel before we came away. 
That will cause us to be hate upon the whole sea. 

9 And he that did do it the truth he'll deny. 
We'll hang with God in yon gallows so high ; 
But he that confess it his life we'll not take, 

But we'll leave him on the very next island we'll meet. 

lo Poor William, poor William then fell to his knees. 
The blood in his veins with horror did freeze. 
And no one did see it but this wicked wretch. 
And he went distracted and died that same night. 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b 
( with sharpened 7th). 



Sung by Mr. Hilliard Smith 
at Hindman, Ky., Aug. 10, 1910 




O where is pret - ty Pol - ly? O yon - der she stands, Gold 




S 



^5 



^=^ 



rings up- on her fin - gers, her 11 - ly white hands. O Pol - ly, O Pol - ly, O 






:|it 



:P^: 



:S^:1!^: 



^-«^ 



Sgj 



Pol - ly, said he, Let's take a ht • tie walk be - fore mar - ried we be. 

2 O William, O William, I don't want to go. 

Your people are all against it and that you well know. 
He led he over high hills and hollows so steep. 
At length pretty Polly began for to weep. 



156 



The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 

3 O William, sweet William, O William, said she, 
I fear your intention is for to murder me 

Polly, O Polly, you have guessed about right, 

1 was digging your grave the best part of last night. 

4 They went on a little farther and she began to shy. 
She saw her grave dug and the spade a-sitting by. 

She threw her arms around him, saying : I am m no fear. 
How can you kill a poor girl that loves you so dear ? 

5 O Polly, O Polly, we have no time for to stand. 
He drew his revolver all out in his hand. 

He shot her through the heart which caused the blood to flow. 
And into her grave her fair body he did throw. 
He threw her in the grave, straightway he did run, 
Left no one to weep but some small birds to mourn. 

6 The ship setting ready all on the sea-side, 

. He swore by his Maker he'd sail the other side. 

All on whilst he was sailing the ship she sprang a leak, 
And away to the bottom sweet William he sank, 

7 There he met with prerty Polly all in the gores of blood, 
In her lily-white arms an infant of mine. 

Such screaming and hollering, it all passed away. 
A debt to the devil he surely had to pay. 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b 
[ Ionian ). 



Sung by Mr. W. Rtley Shelton 
at Alleghany. N C Aug 29, 1916 




He led her through hedges and mire so deep. At length this fair 



--F- 



dam- sel be - gan for to weep, Say-ing: A-wake, you sad vil lain,you're 




3 



I 



:&=&: 



5 



± 



• • — •— '- gj 

lead - ing me a - way Ex - ult - ing for my sweet life to be - tray. 

157 



The Cruel Ship's Carpenter 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 1916 
(a) 



m 



::t 



Hi: 



4=i: 



There was 



a ma - son who Hved by his trade, And he 



rftf 



imm 



^- 



had for his daugh - ter 



beau - ti - ful maid. For 



#- 



^^=r- 



#-: 



wit and for beau - ty there was none to com -pare; For 



;i 



:^: 



her . . old sweet - heart 



t^. 



# 



a ship's 



car - pen - ter. 



i 



158 



No. 40 

Shooting of His Dear 



Pentatonic. Mode i ( no 6th). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 



l§=^ 



-A— 



3^£3 



4zzit 



4^ 





I. Jim -my Dan - nels 
1 


went a - hunt - 


ing 


Be - 


tween sun 


■ set 


and 





^-t 1 ly — ^~ 


-A -| 


\ — ly — N- 


« — ^=-,- 


-H H N 1— 


, 




t'' J ; 




— ::^ J^ S~ 


-• — 


F 


— F — •- 


-j A H — •- 


— 1 


L. 


J s) • • 


4 


44* 


Ll 1 i„s^ 


• <i^ 


^ 


^eJ 1, 



dark. Her white a - pron o - ver her shoul - der, He took her for a swan. 



2 He throwed down his gun 
And to her he run. 

He hugged her, he kissed her 
Till he found she was dead. 

3 Then dropping her down 
To his uncle he run. 
Good woe and good lasses, 
I've killed poor Polly Bam. 

4 O uncle, O uncle, what shall I do ? 
For woe and good lasses, 

I've killed poor Polly Bam. 

Her white apron over her shoulder, 

But woe and good lasses. 

It was poor Polly Bam. 

5 Stay in your own country 
And don't run away. 



6 The day before trial 

The ladies all appeared in a row. 
Polly Bam 'peared among them 
Like a fountain of snow. 

7 Don't hang Jimmy Dannels, 
For he's not to blame. 

My white apron over my shoulder 
He took me for a swan ; 
But woe and good lasses, 
It was me, poor Polly Bam. 

IS9 



Shooting of His Dear 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Addy Crane 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



tt 



m 



--^z 



:t^ 



-z?- 



Mol - ly Van was a - walk - ing When the show - ers came 



}t=i 



I 



-^- 



-t- 



down, And un - der a beech tree For the show -ers to shun. 



'M:^- 



160 



No. 41 
The Lady and the Dragoon 



Hexatonic. 


Mode 4, a. 










Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. i, 1916 


/fiii^'i 1 


1 1 1 






J "gIs 1 


■ III 


1 1 




^^ ^iio A 


• 


m 


^ 


1 1 




T > Z • 




J . 


1 1 • m 


J 










• 


\-4- -4. 


9 9 9* 



'■. T^rre was 



lit - tie sol - dier boy who late - ly came from 



"^^^^ 



=1= 



£ 



o - ver ; He court - ed a rich la - dy who'd mo - ney and 




--^ 



^^^^^. 



4=EE 



store ; And her rich - es was so great that they scarce - ly could be 



Ȥ 



--^- 



E^3^ 



told, But yet she loved a sol -dier boy be - cause he was so bold. 

2 She says : My little soldier, I would freely be your wife, 

If I knowed my cruel old father would surely spare your life. 
He drew his pistol and sword and hung them by his side, 
And swore he would get married, let what would be tried. 

3 As they had been to church and returning home again. 
Out slipped her cruel old father and seven armed men. 
Saying : Since you are determined to be the soldier's wife, 
Way down in the valley I will surely take his life. 

4 O, says the little soldier, I have no time to tattle ; 
I am here in this world in no fix for battle. 

But he drew his pistol and sword and caused them to rattle, 
And the lady held the horse while the soldier fought the battle. 

5 The first one he come to he run him through the main, 
And the next one he come to he served him the same. 
Let's run, says the rest, I'll see we'll all be slain, 

To fight the valiant soldier I see it all in vain. 

6 Up step this old man, speaking mighty bold ; 

You shall have my daughter and a thousand pound of gold, 

F^ht on, says the lady, the pile is too small. 

O stop, says the old man, and you shall have it all. 

161 



The Lady and the Dragoon 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b 
(mixolydian) 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 1916 



i 



=t 



^ 



4^=^:4 



m 



-z=H 



at=«.-=t* 



i 



fl3 



Con-cern-ing of a sol - dier who has late - ly come from war, He is 

'!¥- ^— -a 



--X 



J2(C 



t=^ 



court • ing of my daugh-ter with great rich - es and a store. The 



i 



s=*- 



W 



daugh-ter loved the sol dier be - cause he is poor; Be 



Sg 



:b 



yond 



all the gen - tie - men her sol - dier goes be - fore. 



i 






:^=t 



I 



162 



No, 42 

The Boatsman and the Chest 



Hexatonic Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs Maby Sands 
at Allanstand. N C, Aug 4 1916 




:=a=^ 



:=d^^ 



^3^ 



It 






I. There was 



lit - tie boats - man, wher - ev - er he did 




dwell, 



And he had 
(a) 



lit - tie 



nie and the tai - lor loved her 
(a) 



-3=^- 



t-==^ 



tl-=-\=l 



:t 



well, And he could not step more than one inch out of the 

-•- 




way 



Till 



trick 



up - on 



^r=i 



his wife the 



lit 



tie 



i 



3 



^=*-— • (^ 



r=^ 



§£ 



— s? 



tai - lor he would play. Sing - ing fol de dol the day long. 



6=p: 



-» — ^ 



g 



r=^ 



W^ 



I 



2 The boatsman came home when he come at night, 
And he knocked on the door and he knocked just right. 
This stirred the little tailor from his sleep : 

kind Miss, where can I creep .'' 

3 She put him in the chest and bid him lie still : 
You're just as safe there as a mouse in a mill. 
She trippled downstairs and she opened the door, 
And in come her husband and three or four more. 

4 She 'luted to him and give to him a kiss. 
Saying : O kind Sir, what's the meaning of this ? 

1 haven't come here for to disturb you of your rest. 

But to come to bid you good-bye and to take away my chest. 

163 



The Boatsman and the Chest 

5 The boatsman being young and very stout and strong, 
He picked up the chest and he carried it along. 

But he had not got more'n half through the town, 

Till the weight of the little tailor boy made him lie it down. 

6 He opened the lid and says to them all : 
Here lies a little tailor like a pig in a stall. 

I'll take him to the king and make you serve your time with him ; 
See if that will put an end to this night's cuckolding. 



164 



No. 43 

The Holly Twig 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 




:1: 



2. Mon - day, boys, I got me a wife. Hop - ing to lead 




P- 



:^=4^ 



3^=_E 



=1: 



bet - ter life, But to my sur - prise I . . found it not so, And 



li 



-^i=i 



i 



;i] 



?tt=j: 



f = S)— 

all my plea-sure turned to woe, And all my plea -sure turned to woe. 

1 When I was a bachelor bold and brave, 

I wanted for nothing my heart could crave ; 

But kisses and guineas I made them fiy, 

I slipped on my beaver hat and who was like I ? 

or 
When I was a bachelor bold and young, 
I courted a girl with a flattering tongue ; 
The kisses I give her was a hundred and ten. 
Promised to marry, but didn't tell her when. 

2 Monday, boys, I got me a wife. 
Hoping to lead a better life ; 

But to my surprise I found it not so, 
And all my pleasure turned to woe. 

3 Tuesday, boys, to my surprise, 
Just before the sun did rise. 

She riz in a fit and scolded me more 
Than ever I was scolded before. 

4 Wednesday, boys, I went to the woods 

To get me some hickories to make her good. 

As I passed by the willow so green, 

I cut me the toughest that ever was seen. 

5 Thursday, boys, I laid them by. 
Resolving Friday for to try. 

If she's no better the better may be. 

The devil may take her and keep her for me. 

165 



The Holly Twig 

6 Saturday, boys, I lammed her well, 

I kicked her and cuffed her to the lowest pits of hell. 
The ruby and the booby and two little devils came, 
They carried her off in a fire of flame. 



My biggest bottle is my best friend, 
My week's work is all at an end. 



166 



No. 44 



Polly Oliver 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 1916 



^EEr=: 



• • m • •— 



-(©- 



S 



fM 



i 



I. So ear - ly one morn - ing pret - ty Pol ■ ly she rose And 



3^4^^^ 



-• — •- 



• — ^- 



-«>- 



=f^=e=e: 






:^=^ 



itzi: 



dress-ed her -self in a suit of men's clothes. Now down to the sta - blepret-ty 



F:#i: 



g 



^t^ 



• ^ 






-^ 



•— ^-^ a 

Pol - ly's just gone To view out a geld - ing to tra - vel her ground. 



2 In riding all day and riding in speed 

The first thing she come to was her captain indeed. 
She stepped up to him. What news do you bear .-' 
Here's a kind, loving letter from Polly your dear. 

3 In breaking this letter ten guineas he found. 

He drunk his own health with the soldiers all round ; 
And reading the letter, he sit and did cry, 
Not a-thinking Polly was nigh. 



167 



No. 45 

The Rich Old Lady 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, 
a + b (dorian). 



Sung by Mrs. Gosnell 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 1916 



=^^ 



;a=t 





I. There was a 

fe^» — f — i— 


ric 


h old 


la 


dy 


In 

— fv- 


Lon - don she did dwell ; She 

-^ h^ 1 \ . !^ 


|-*> 


zs 


i^^-^ F 


-# — 


=f=t- 


-*- 


1 — 

— • — 


— 1 — 
-• — 


:t=L^-=J=4^ 


t4^_J 


S 





loved her own man dear - 


ly, But an 


- o-therman twice as well. 




7i i 


^ 


"I ^ 1^ 1 




/'■k^ . . 1 1 


C 






nf 


\ *> ~ V A m 


(^ X 


§441 


1 


k^ 


2^L_J _ J ^ •__ 


\ \ 


• • 


^ si . - 



Sing to the I 



re 



O . . Sing to the I 



re 



O. 



2 She went to the doctor's shop, 
As hard as she could go, 

To see if there was anythhig she could find 
To turn her old man blind. 

3 She got two walloping mar' bones 
And made him eat them all. 

He says : O my dear beloved wife, 
I can't see you at all. 

4 If I could see my way to go, 
I'd go to the river and drown. 
She says : I'll go along with you 
For fear you go astray. 

5 She got up behind him 

Just ready for to plunge him in ; 
He stepped a little to one side, 
Headlong she went in. 

6 She begin to kick and scream 
As loud as she could bawl. 

He says : O my dear beloved wife, 
I can't see you at all. 

7 Him being tender-hearted 
And thinking she could swim, 
He got him a great, long pole 
And pushed her away out in. 

168 



No, 46 

Edwin in the Lowlands Low 
A 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 




4=^--:^ J J- 

m L— « •- — *- 



^- 



r- 



=t 




I. Young Ed- ward came to Em - i - ly His gold all for to 

k~ — -- t^-H — -f-i — j=r ^ ' ^ ^ . I I ^ I . 



show, That he has made all on the lands. All on the low- lands 



i-d: 



^ — •- 



low. My fa - ther keeps a board - ing house All down by yon - der 



-4-- 



d^ 



^ — • 



I 



sea ; And you . . go there this night And un - til mom - ing be. 

2 Young Emily in het chamber, 
She dreamed an awful dream ; 

She dreamed she saw young Edward's blood 

Go flowing like the stream. 

She rose so early in the morning 

And dressed herself although 

To go and see young Edward, 

Who ploughed the lowlands low. 

3 O father, where's that stranger 
Came here last night to dwell ? 
His body's in the ocean 

And you no tales must tell. 
O father, O father, you'll die a public show 
For the murdering of young Edward 
Who ploughed the lowlands low. 

4 Away then to some councillor 
To let the deeds be known. 
The jury found him guilty 
His trial to come on. 

On trial they found him guilty 
And hanged was to be 
For the murdering of young Edward, 
Who ploughed the lowlands low. 

169 



Edwin in the Lowlands Low 

The fish that's in the ocean 
Swims over young Edward's breast, 
While his body's in the ocean 
I hope his soul's at rest, 
For his name it was young Edward, 
Who ploughed the lowlands low. 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



% 



4=:t 



B 



(a) 



Sung by Mr. T Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 6, 191 6 



;e^=3=S 



--■^t 



si- 



Miss Em - 'ly was a maid so fair. She loved her dri - ver boy. He 






--^- 



^SEi 



drove the mail some gold to gain, Way down in the low 
^H, (a) .M (^) ' ^u (^) 



lands low. 



;i] 






2 My father keeps a public house 
On yonders river side. 

Go ye, go there and enter in 
And there this night abide. 

3 Be sure that you tell nothing. 
Nor let my parents know 

That your name it is young Edmund, 
Who drove in the lowlands low. 

4 Young Edmund fell a-drinking 
When time for to go to bed. 

He did not know that his sword that night 
Would part his neck and head. 

5 Miss Emily up next morning, 
The sun was shining bright, 

Saying : I am going to marry the driver boy, 
Who come here to stay last night. 

6 O daughter, dear daughter Emily, 
His gold we will make sure. 

I've here sent his body a-drowning 
Way down in the ocean low. 

170 



Edwin in the Lowlands Low 

7 O dear, dear, cruel father, 
You shall die a public show 

For murdering of my old true love, 
Who drove in the lowlands low. 

8 There's a coach on yonders mountain, 
It tosses to and fro. 

It 'minds nie of my driver boy 
Who drove in the lowlands low. 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b 
(with sharpened 7th). 



Sung by Miss McKinney 
at Habersham Co., Ga., May 28, 1910 



^33 



I. Young Em - 'ly was a maid so fair, She 



loved 



dri 



^- 



boy, Who drove in the main some gold for to gain Down 



-?5^ 



--A- 



H: 



-^5^ 



>=ii^= 



in . the low 

r-^; ^ w ~ 


lands 

~^~s — 


low. 

r-'5>— 


In 

3 

* 


a - bout 
3 


sev 


- en years young 

r^ ^ — ^~l 


=tf^-F — r — t — r- 


1 


— t^ — 




=f ?- 


1 


_r_. ^ — J__ 


\A) \ I' ^ ^ 1 


1 1 




X)' ^ 








' 







Ed - ward re - turned His for - tunes for 



to show, And the 




-^ 



jtz^jiz 



^ 



gold he gained by driv-ing in the main Down in . the low - lands low. 



2 Young Edward fell a-drinking, 
It was time for to go to bed, 
Although he wasn't a-thinking 
The custom came around his head. 
Youny Emily fell asleep that night ; 
She dreamed a frightful dream ; 
She dreamed that her love was bleeding, 
The blood ran down in streams. 



171 



Edwin in the Lowlands Low 

3 Next morn she rose, put on her clothes, 
And to her parents did go, 
Enquiring for her driver boy, 

Who drove in the lowlands low. 

mother, where is my driver boy 
Who came last night for to stay ? 

He's gone for to dwell no tongue can tell 
How cruel your father did say. 

4 O father, cruel father, 
You'll die a public show, 
For killing of my driver boy. 
Who drove in the lowlands low. 

5 My love is in the ocean 
While fish play o'er his breast. 
His body's in a constant motion ; 

1 hope his soul's at rest. 

His coaches are in the mountain, 
The rivers are all aflow. 
It reminds me of my driver boy, 
Who drove in the lowlands low. 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



m 



4l=t 



--X 



^=F^j=j= 






• — S- 




Young Em - 'ly was a ve - ry nice girl. She court - ed the dri - ver's 



53^ 



I 



-z?- 



=t 



-t 



3^ 



:4: 



-N N- 



-•^*- 



:4= 



^^» 



• — ^-si- 



boy, Who drove the stage, gold for to gain, Down in the low-lands low. 

(1) „i. (*) .ii (') 



ISe^ 




1^^^^ 



172 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



No. 47 

Awake ! Awake ! 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. i, 1916 



± 



=F= 



=& 



I. A- wake ! a - wake ! you drow-sy sleep-er, A-wake ! a -wake! it's al - most 



::± 



:-p5^-i 



&3 



:|^ 



^ 



-F=^ — V- — * 



4= 



•— z^ # 

day ; How can you lie and sleep and slumber And your true love go-ing far a- way? 



2 Say, my love, go ask your mother 
If you my bride, my bride shall be ; 

And if she says No, love, come and tell me ; 
It will be the last time I'll bother thee. 

3 I'll not go and ask my mother, 
For she lies on her bed at rest, 
And in her hands she holds a paper 
That speaks the most of my distress. 

4 Say, my love, go ask your father 

If you my bride, my bride shall be ; 

And if he says No, love, come and tell me ; 

It will be the last time I'll bother thee. 

5 I will not go and ask my father, 
For he lies on his bed at rest. 

And in his hands he holds a weapon 
To kill the man that I love best. 

6 I'll go down in some lone valley 

And spend my weeks, my months, my years, 
And I'll eat nothing but green willow, 
And I'll drink nothing but my tears. 

7 Then come back, come back, my own true lover, 
Come back, come back, in grief cried she, 

And I'll forsake both father and mother 
And I'll cry, love, and pity thee. 



173 



Awake ! Awake ! 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 




Sung by Mrs. Anelize Chandler 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 



:i 



=t 



-^ 



=F== 



-4: 



-=\z 



F^ 



1. A - wake! a - wake! you drow - sy sleep - er, 

J = J 



A - wake ! a 



ej: 



fi: 



-t- 



£ 



£ 



•"^ 



,- ^-^- 



4=t-i 



• — d- 



wake! it's al - most day. Who's there? who's there at my 




i^i 



t2 



--^- 



:^=^: 



^^ffi 



I 



25Hr- 

doors and win - dows? Who's there, who's there? in grief, cried she. 

(a) 



--i=\ 



=t:=F 



:& 



•— ^ 



I 



2 It's me alone, your own true love, 
He's just now here going away. 

Go away, go away from my doors and windows, 
Go away, go away, in grief, cried she. 

3 It's you go, love, and ask your father 
If you my bride, my bride shall be ; 

And if he says No, love, come and tell me ; 
And this'U be the last time I'll bother thee. 

4 It's I will not go and ask my father, 
For he's on his bed at rest a-sleeping. 
And in his hands he holds a weapon 
That will be a grief to thee. 

5 It's you go, love, and ask your mother 
If you my bride, my bride shall be ; 

And if she says No, love, come and tell me ; 
And this'll be the last time I'll bother thee. 

6 I'll not go in and ask my mother. 

For she's on her bed at rest a-sleeping, 
For in her hand she holds a card, love, 
That'll be bad news to thee. 



174 



Awake ! Awake ! 

7 It's rise you up, love, come and pity me. 

For I'm going away to some sandy river bottom, 

And while I spend my days, my weeks, my months and years, 

I'll eat nothing but green willow and drink nothing but my tears. 

8 Come back, come back, my love, and let me tell you. 
If you will go with me, 

I will forsake both father and mother 

And go along with you and spend my life for ever. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 




-F= 



I. O Ka - tie dear, go ask your fa - ther If you may be a bride of 



:i 



--^- 



rr=^=i 



-p 



mine ; If he says No,please come and tell me ; And I '11 no long - er trou - ble you. 

2 O Willie dear, it's no use to ask him. 
He's in his room and taking his rest. 
By his side a golden dagger 

To kill the one that I love best. 

3 O Katie dear, go ask your mother 
If you may be a bride of mine ; 

If she says No, please come and tell me ; 
And I'll no longer trouble you. 

4 O Willie dear, it's no use to ask. 
She's in her room and taking her rest. 
By her side a silver dagger 

To kill the one that I love best. 

5 O he picked up a silver dagger, 

He pierced it through his wounded breast. 
Farewell, Kitty, farewell, darling, 
I'll die for the one that I love best. 

6 She picked up the bloody weapon, 

She pierced it through her snow-white breast. 
Farewell, mamma, farewell papa, 
I'll go with the one that I love best. 



17i 



No. 48 

The Green Bed 




Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 

/TV 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 



ia=t 



--i==^ 



I. 

^"^ 


come 
3 


you 

1 


home, dear John - 







come you home 1 

1 


rem 


/. 




1 


^F 


1 




1 1 




/ b ^ 






F P 1 m 


1^ 




,ri 


1 


f'sP '^ 


i 




1 1 -1 


1 J m 




J J 








Lj \ ^ [__J 





• • 


si . 



g 



sea? Last . . night my daugh-ter Pol - ly was dream - ing of thee. 



f^: 



m 



i 



ll 



p 



m 



-^ — * 



p 



f — r 



2 O what for luck, dear Johnny ? 
No for luck, says he ; 

I lost my ship and cargo 
All on the raging sea. 

3 Go bring your daughter Polly 
And set her down by me. 
We'll drink a melancholy 
And married we will be. 

4 My daughter's busy 

And can't come in to thee ; 
Except you wait an hour, 
It's one, two and three. 

5 O Johnny, being drowsy. 
He dropped down his head. 
He called for a candle 

To light him to bed. 

6 My beds they are full 
And has been all the week, 
And now for your lodging 
Out of doors you may seek. 

7 It's bring here your reckoning book, 
Johnny he did say. 

And let me pay my reckoning bill 
Before I go away. 

176 



The Green Bed 

8 'Twas then forty guineas 
Polly did behold, 

And out of his pockets 
Drawed handfuls of gold. 

9 The old woman she vowed, 
. And she vowed in a tusk, 

Saying what she had said 
Had been through a joke. 

10 My green beds they are empty 
And have been all this week, 
Awaiting for you and daughter Po'.ly 
To take a pleasant sleep. 

11 It's you and your daughter Polly 
Both deserves to be burned. 
And before I lodge here 

I would lodge in a barn. 

12 Be careful of your money, boys, 
And lay it up in store. 

And when you have no money, boys, 
You're turned out of doors. 



177 



No. 49 

The Simple Ploughboy 



Major mode. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 1916 




I. 'Twas ear - ly one morn - ing the plough-boy a - rose, As he 



:i 



Z- 



:1=:^ 



walked out on his farm, He whis-tled and he sang as he 

3 







=^=q^ 



walked a - long, 'Twas by chance that I spied a come - ly 

3 



J ^ *=• .^ • 



=• . I, ^ h * — ^— f 



I 



maid, come - ly maid, 'Twas by chance that I spied a come - ly maid. 

Mrs. Betty Stntth's Variant. 



W^^S 



2 Saying : Supposing you fall in love and your parents won't approve, 
Straightway they'll send you to sea. 

They'll press force against you and hurry you away. 
And send you to the wars to be slain. 

3 She dressed herself in men's clothes, so costly and so fine. 
Her pockets well filled with gold. 

She walked up to London and she walked back again 
Enquiring for her sailor boy. 

4 He has 'listed on the deep and is rolling on the sleet 
And has gone to the wars to be slain. 



5 O she threw it on the deck and caught him round his neck, 
And she kissed him till she brought him safe on shore, 
Saying : The bells may loudly ring and the fair maids may sing ; 
I'll get married to the lady I adore. 

178 



No. 50 

The Three Butchers 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 ( no 6th ). 



Sung by Mr. Dana Norton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



4=i-i: 




-^=t 



3^ 



-^-- 



^^^ 



I. John - son said to Dick - y One cold win - ter's day: For to 



=E 



=4=i 



P 



-<S>-r 



let's go ride the moun - tains For to pass the time a 



way. 



2 They rode up on the mountain, 
The mountain being high. 
Dicky said to Johnson : 

I heard a woman cry. 

3 They looked off to the right 
And then to the left ; 
Dicky seen a naked woman 
All chained down by herself. 

4 Dicky, being kind 

To all the female kind, 

He wropt a great coat round her 

And took her on behind. 

5 They rode on a little piece farther 
To a certain point of the road. 

She slapped three fingers over her eyes 
And gave three screams and a cry, 

6 Out stepped seven robbers 
With weapons in their hands, 
Took Dicky by the bridle, 

Said : Young man, your life is mine. 

7 Johnson said to Dicky : 
Let's take wings and fly. 
Dicky said to Johnson : 
I'll die before I fly. 

8 And from that morning 
Till the sun set that night, 
Dicky killed six of the robbers 
And made the seventh take flight. 

179 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



-4-(*)- 



The Three Butchers 

9 Dicky being tired, 
He laid down to rest. 
That woman stole his dagger 
And stuck it in his breast. 

10 Good woman, good woman, 

Can you tell me the crime you have done ? 
You have killed the bravest soldier 
That ever fought the gun. 



B 



i — 1- 



Sung by Miss Linnie Landers 
at Carmen, N. C, Sept. 5, 1916 



-#-r- 



I. Dick - y said to John - son One cold win- ter's day: Let's 



=(:- 



^^ 



go and ride the moun - tain And pass the time a - way. 



180 



No. 51 

William Taylor 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. ROSIE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 




3 



•^i*: 



J ' — • 



^ 



<Zf 



I. If you're on pur - suit for your own true lov - er, Pray tell me 



F=± 



- 4 — • - 



r- 



what . . be his name. His name may be 



one . . Wil - Ham 




3^ 



-(5*-^ 



^-^-^ 



i 



Tay - lor 



Who sailed 



way the 



ther 



year. 



2 If his name may be one William Taylor, 
Very like, very like I know the man. 

If you'll rise early in the morning, 
You'll see him walking down the strand. 

3 As she rose early the very next morning, 
Just about the break of day. 

And she saw her own dear William Taylor 
A-walking with his lady gay. 

4 If this here is my William Taylor, 
Good lord, good lass, what shall I do ? 
She wrung her lily-white hands and crying. 
And overboard her body threw. 



181 



No. 52 

The Golden Glove 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a -f b 
(ionian ). 




:=i: 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug, 2, 1916 
(a) 



^- 



' --i^ Jr 

I. In pan - ta - loons and waist - coats this la - dy she put 



3 



E 



=1== 



on, And 



way she went a - hunt - ing with her 



fc^=± 



-sh 



^E^E 



£ 



-p 



dog and her gun ; And she hunt - ed all a - round where the 




3t=t=t 



=^==1: 



=t 



• — ^i^i 



farm- er he did dwell, Be -cause in her heart she loves him so well. 



c — ^ u 



2 In firing one time but nothing did kill, 

Out came the farmer and whistled to his field. 
She step-ped up to him, these words she did say : 
Why wasn't you at the wedding, the wedding to-day ? 
Why wasn't you at the wedding to wait upon the Squire 
And to give to him his bride ? 

3 Back to this lady the farmer replied : 

I will not give her up for I love her too well. 

This pleased this young lady in hearing him so bold. 

She gave to him her glove that was covered in gold. 

4 I picked it up as I came along, 

As I came a-hunting with my dog and my gun ; 
Returning back home with her heart all filled with love, 
Put out the new oration that she had lost her glove. 
And if any man will find it and bring it to me, 
Him I will marry and his lady I will be. 

182 



The Golden Glove 

5 Now I am married I will tell to you my fun, 

How I hunted up my farmer with my dog and my gun, 
And now I have got him so closely in a share, 
I will not give him up I vow and declare. 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b 
( ionian ). 



B 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 1916 



m 



^ m- 



:=1: 



X^ 



'(z- 



:i=P= 



• — #1 



r^^ 



~^- 



-TZt 



^ 



183 



No. 53 



Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 



^^ 






I. The 



per - ba - dus la - dy, the per - ba - dus la - dy, The 



tt 



1^ 



H 



9 



ii 



per 



ba - dus la - dy, and her for - tune was 




great. And she fix - ed her eyes on 



a bold Eng-lish soldier, Says: 




2 A I perbadus lady, a | perbadus lady, 

A I perbadus | lady was deep to de- | ny. 
But in old English | land I | vowed to a lady, 
And I at my re- | turn I must make her my | bride. 

3 She I dressed herself in | many rich 'tires 

And I in costly | diamonds she plaited her | hair ; 

A hundred of | slaves she | took to wait on her 

And I with her two | maidens she went to him | there. 

4 Saying : | Now if you fancy a | perbadus lady, 
A I perbadus | lady and her fortune is | great. 
Saying : Now if you can | fancy a | perbadus lady, 

You shall have | music to | charm you to your silent | sleep. 

5 A I perbadus lady, a | perbadus lady, 
A I perbadus | lady was deep to | deny. 

But in old English | land I | vowed to a lady. 
And I at my re- | turn I must make her my 1 bride. 

184 



Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth 

6 Whilst I he was a-sailing back | to his true lover, 
She I wrote a | letter to the boatswain her | friend, 
Saying : A handsome re- | ward I | surely will give you 
If I you the | life of young Jemmy will | end. 

7 For the | sake of the money and for the | wit of the beauty, 
As I they were a- | lonely the same did com- | plete. 

And as they were a- | lonely a-| sailing together, 
He I suddenly | did plant him into the | deep. 

8 In the | dead time of night when they | all lie a-sleeping, 
A I trouble it | did to her window appear. 

Saying : Rise you up | here, it's | here, pretty Nancy, 
And I 'fer to the | vows that you made to your | dear. 

9 She I raised her head off her | soft downy pillow 

And I straight to her j gazement ( casement ) she did ap- | pear, 
And the | moon being | bright and so | clearly shining : 
That I surely | must be the voice of my | dear. 

10 O I yes, dearest Nancy, I | am your true lover, 
I Dead or a- | live you know you're my [ own. 
And now for your | promises | I am pursuing 
To I follow me | down to the watery | tomb. 

11 O I yes, dearest Jemmy, I'll | soon be a-going, 
I'll I soon plunge | into your arms a- | sleep. 

And no sooner this | unfortuned | lady she spoken, 
She I suddenly | did plunge herself into the | deep. 

12 Then | at the sea-side he was | tried for the murder 
And I at the ship's | arms he was hung for the | same ; 

And the old man's heart was | broke and he | died for his daughter 
Be I fore the | ship into the harbour it j came. 



185 



No. 54 

The Silk Merchant's Daughter 
A 

Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 




^^ 



d: 



d=S: 



Jt—tL 






I. There was a rich mer-chant in Lon-don did right Had one on - ly 



-#=^- • 



S^ 



=F= 



:^ 



It 



-y — \/- 



daugh - ter, her beau - ty shined bright. She lov - ed a port - er and to 



d^ 



^^ 



d: 



JLzit 



:e^' 



pre- vent the day Of mar-riage, they sent this poor young man a - way. 



2 O now he is gone for to serve his king, 
It grieves this lady to think of the thing. 

She dressed herself up in rich merchant's shape, 
She wandered away her true love for to seek. 

3 As she was a-travelling one day, almost night, 
A couple of Indians appeared in her sight, 
And as they drew nigh her, O this they did say : 
Now we are resolved to take your life away. 

4 She had nothing by her but a sword to defend. 
These barbarous Indians murder intend. 

But in the contest one of them she did kill 
Which caused the other for to leave the hill. 

5 As she was a-sailing over the tide. 
She spied a city down by the sea-side. 

She saw her dear porter a-walking the street, 
She made it her business her true love to meet. 

6 How do you do, sir, where do you belong ? 
I'm a-hunting a diamond and I must be gone. 
He says : I'm no sailor, but if you want a man, 
For my passage over I'll do all I can. 

7 Then straightway they both went on board. 

Says the captain to the young man : What did you do with 

your sword ? 
On account of long travel on him she did gaze. 
Once by my sword my sweet life did save. 

186 



The Silk Merchant's Daughter 

8 Then straightway to London their ship it did steer, 
Such utter destruction to us did appear. 

It was all out on main sea, to our discontent. 

Our ship sprung a leak and to the bottom she went. 

9 There was four and twenty of us contained in one boat, 
Our provision gave out and our allowance grew short. 
Our provisions gave out and death drawing nigh, 

Says the captain ; Let's cast lots for to see who shall die. 

10 Then down on a paper each man's name was wrote, 
Each man ran his venture, each man had his note. 
Amongst the whole ship's crew this maid's was the least, 
It was her lot to die for to feed all the rest. 

1 1 Now, says the captain, let's cast lots and see 
Amongst the ship's crew who the butcher will be. 
It's the hardest of fortune you ever did hear. 

This maid to be killed by the young man, her dear. 

12 He called for a basin for to catch the blood 
While this fair lady a trembling stood, 

Saying : Lord, have mercy on me, how my poor heart do bleed 
To think I must die, hungry men for to feed, 

13 Then he called for a knife his business to do. 
She says : Hold your hand for one minute or two. 
A silk merchant's daughter in London I be ; 
Pray see what I've come to by loving of thee. 

14 Then she showed a ring betwixt them was broke. 
Knowing the ring, with a sigh he spoke : 

For the thoughts of your dying my poor heart will burst, 
For the hopes of your long life, love, I will die first. 

15 Says the captain : If you love her you'll make amend, 
But the fewest of number will die for a friend. 

So quicken the business and let it be done. 

But while they were speaking they all heard a gun. 

16 Says the captain : You may now all hold your hand, 
We all hear a gun, we are near ship or land. 

In about half an hour to us did appear 

A ship bound for London which did our hearts cheer. 

It carried us safe over and us safe conveyed, 

And then they got married this young man and maid. 

187 



The Silk Merchant's Daughter 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 191 6 



d=d===i=4 



=i: 



--^ 



ES3^^^3 



I. O now says the Cap -tain : Let's cast lots and see A-mongstthe whole 



n]: 



d: 



£ 



:t 



:t 



i 



i±» 



:=t: 



4== 



ship's crew who the but - cher will be. A-mongstthe whole ship's crew this 



:^ 



:& 



I 



=F=f= 



^5E=^=^.=d===" 



=^= 



•izr 



maid was the last And she must die . . to feed all the rest. 



No. 55 

Jack Went A-Sailing 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 26, 1916 






^ 



V 



V- 



:?=±=f: 



±: 






I. Jack went a - sail - ing With trou - ble on his mind, To 



^=-^-- 



r- 



::l=i==^: 



:=^: 



=± 



:i 



leave his na - live coun - try And his dar - ling dear be 



im 



in 



-25^ 



hind. Sing ree and sing low, So fare you well, my dear. 

2 She dressed herself in men's array, 
And apparel she put on ; 
Unto the field of battle 
She marched her men along. 

3 Your cheeks too red and rosy, 
Your fingers too neat and small. 
And your waist too slim and slender 
To face a cannon ball. 

4 My cheeks are red and rosy. 
My fingers neat and small, 
But it never makes me tremble 
To face a cannon ball. 

5 The battle being ended, 
She rode the circle round, 
And through the dead and dying, 
Her darling dear she found. 

6 She picked him up all in her arms, 
She carried him down to town. 
And sent for a London doctor 
To heal his bleeding wounds. 

7 This couple they got married, 
So well they did agree ; 
This couple they got married. 
And why not you and me ? 

189 



Jack Went A-Sailing 
B 



Heptatonic. Mode 2, 
a -j- b (aeolian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Combs 
at Knott County, Ky., August, 1908 



t 



!2: 



W^^ 



-4=^z 



=F^=r 



I. There was a weal - thy mer - chant, In Lon - don he did 




dwell, 



He 



had one love - ly daugh - ter, The 



i\ 



-# 3: -r 



-251- 



truth to you I'll tell, O the truth to you I'll tell. 



2 She had sweethearts a-plenty, 
She courted both day and night, 
Till all on the sailor boy 

She placed her heart's delight. 

3 Her father heard the callin', 
So quickly he came in. 
Good morning, Mrs. Frasier, 

Is that your sweetheart's name ? 

4 I will lock you in my dungeon. 
Your body I'll confine. 

If there is none but Jacky Frasier 
That will ever suit your mind. 

5 You can lock me in your dungeon. 
It is hard to be confined, 

But there is none but Jacky Frasier 
That will ever suit my mind. 

6 O daughter, O daughter, 

If you will quit that boy to-day, 
I'll pay him forty shillings 
To bear him far away. 

7 She answered him quickly, quickly, 
I'll quit that boy to-day ; 

But yet all in her heart 
She loved her darling still. 

190 



Jack Went A-Sailing 

8 When her father saw him coming, 
He flew in an angry way. 

She gave him forty shilUngs 
To bear him far away. 

9 He sailed East, and he sailed West 
All across the deep blue sea, 

So safely he got landed 
In the wars of Germany. 

10 This girl being a girl of honour 
With money in her hand. 

She set her resolution 

To visit some foreign land. 

1 1 She went down to a tailor's shop 
And dressed all in men's gray, 
And laboured for the captain 
To bear her far away. 

12 Your waist is too long and slender, 
Your fingers too long and small. 
Your cheeks too red and rosy 

To face the cannon ball. 

13 It's true my waist is long and slender, 
My fingers they are small ; 

It would not change my countenance 
To see ten thousand fall. 

14 Kind sir, your name I would like to know 
Before aboard you go. 

She smiled all in her countenance : 
They call me Jackaro. 

15 She sailed all over the ocean, 
All over the deep blue sea ; 
So safely she got landed 

In the wars of Germany. 

16 She went out to the battlefield. 
She viewed it up and down ; 
Among the dead and wounded 
Her darling boy she found. 

17 She picked him up all in her arms 
And carried him to the town, 
Enquiring for a doctor 

To heal his bloody wound. 

191 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Jack Went A-Sailing 

18 So here's a handsome couple 
So quickly did agree. 
How stylish they got married, 
And why not you and me ? 



Sung by Miss MacKinney 
at Habersham Co., Ga., May 28, 1910 



S^ 



^2z=t 



:t=^ 



I. There was a silk mer - chant In Lon - don town did dwell. He 



i 



-^c=i»= 



^£ 



i=E 



-25*- 



had one on - ly daugh - ter. And the truth to you I'll 



I 



S 



:^ 



i 



tell. 



Sing li 



H. 



H, O, 



O li 



U, li - U, O. 



2 This young lady she was courted 
By men of high degree ; 

There was none but Jack the sailor 
Would ever do for she. 

3 As soon as her waiting-maid 
Heard what she did say, 
She went unt© her father 
With her heart content. 

4 Dear daughter, if this be true 
What I have heard of you, 
It's Jackie shall be vanished 
And you confined shall be. 

5 This body you may have, 
My heart you can't confine ; 
There's none but Jack the sailor 
That can have this heart of mine. 

6 Poor Jackie, he's gone sailing 
With trouble on his mind, 
A-leaving of his country 
And darling girl behind. 

192 



Jack Went A-Sailing 

7 Poor Jackie, he's gone sailing, 
His face we shall see no more. 
He's landed at San Flanders 
On the dismal sandy shore. 

8 She went into the tailor shop 
And dressed in men's array, 
And went into a vessel 

To convey herself away. 

9 Before you step on board, sir, 
Your name I'd like to know. 

She smiled all over her countenance : 
They call me Jack Monroe. 

ID Your waist is light and slender, 
Your fingers neat and small, 
Your cheeks too red and rosy 
To face the cannon ball. 

Ill know my waist is light and slender. 
My fingers are neat and small. 
But I never change my countenance 
To face the cannon ball. 

12 The wars being over. 
She hunted all around 
Among the dead and wounded. 
And her darling boy she found. 

13 She picked him all up in her arms 
And carried him to the town. 
And sent for a physician 

Who quickly healed his wounds. 

14 This couple they got married. 
So well did they agree. 

This couple they got married, 
And why not you and me ? 



D 

Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
Hexatonic. Mode 4, a.* at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



^ 



^3^=4 



gra J^^ ^^=====^====^==f=r=^===P=F 



Jack he went a - sail - ing.With trou - ble on his mind, To 

* If A be tonic : — Mode 2, a. 

193 



Jack Went A-Sailing 



i 



f=ji 



:i 



m 



-z^ 



leave his own dear coun - try, His dar - ling dear be - hind, And 



g 



-7^ 



I 



am left 



lone, And 



am left 



lone. 



194 



SONGS 



195 



No. 56 
The Rejected Lover 



A 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 



S 



I. O 



once 



I court - ed 



pret - ty lit - tie girl And I 



g 



-f5'-=- 



-p 



f= 



^ 



¥ 



loved her as my life. I'd free - ly give my heart and hand To have 



w =^ i ^ 



I 



made her 



my 



wife, 



O 



to have made her my wife. 



2 I took her by the hand 
And 1 led her to the door. 

I kindly asked this pretty girl 
To kiss me once more, 
O to kiss me once more. 

3 O who will shoe your feet, my love, 
And who will glove your hands, 
And who will kiss your ruby lips 
When I'm in the far-off land ? 

4 My father'U shoe my feet, my love, 
My mother will glove my hand. 
And you may kiss my ruby lips 
When you come from far-off land. 

5 My being gone six long months, 
It gave her room to complain. 
And she wrote me a letter, saying : 
You can't come again. 

6 One cold winter night when I was a-riding 
And a-drinking of good wine, 

And a-thinking of the pretty little girl 
That stole that heart of mine. 

7 I wish I'd a-died when I was young, 
Or never had a-been born, 

For I never would have met her rosy cheeks, 
Nor heard her flattering tongue. 

197 



The Rejected Lover 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 2, 
a -}- b ( aeolian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Addy Crane 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



=t 



:#: 



4izt 



g 



I. I used to have a sweet- heart And I loved her as my 



d= 



W- 



life, And so free - ly would I give this world To have 

^ {c) 



^ 



sir 



made her for my wife, To have made her for my wife. 



m 



I 



2 She took me by the hand 
As we stood all in the door, 
And the words she said to me 
Was to come back no more, 
O to come back no more. 

3 I stayed away six weeks 

And it caused her to complain. 
She wrote me a letter, saying : 
Come back again, 
O come back again. 

4 I wrote her an amswer 
Just for to let her know 

That no young man would venture 
Where he once could not go, 
O he once could not go. 

5 Come all you fair young men 
And a warning take by me. 
Never place your affections 
On a green growing tree, 

O a green growing tree. 



198 



The Rejected Lover 

6 The leaves they will wither, 
And the roots they will decay ; 
And the beauty of a fair young girl 
Will soon fade away, 
O will soon fade away. 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mr. Wesley Batten 
at Mount Fair, Va., Sept. 22, 1916 




I once knew a pret - ty girl And I loved her as my life, And I'd 



4 



:p^i==p: 



S3 



free- ly give my life to make her my wife, O . 



to make her my wife. 



2 And she took me by the hand. 
And she led me to the door. 
And she put her arms around me, 
Saying : You can't come any more, 
O you can't come any more. 

3 And I'd not been gone but six months 
Before she did complain ; 

And she wrote me a letter 
Saying : O do come again, 
O do come again. 



199 



No. 57 

The Lover's Lament 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b 
( dorian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Noah Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 



;j= 



-5?- 



I^ZZZ^ 



1. Don't you re - mem - ber last Fri - day night 



£ 



What 



you 



did 



tell 



set - ting by 



my 



-i 



¥ 



^ 



^ 



side? You told me that you loved me so plain - ly in your 



^P^ 



=#P= 



=J= 



heart, Ex - cept - ing we get mar - ried no more can I rest. 

I \0) ( Secant^ and subsequent stanzas ) 



:* 



i 



^ 



i 



way 



to 



geth - er, to - ge - ther we did 



:i 



I 



Ep 



-25l— 



^—•—^ 



r- 



# 



go. Here comes her old fa - ther this for to know. 



2 Away together, together we did go. 

Here comes her old father this for to know. 

He put her in a room and he locked her up so severely, 

That he never got to see you, my dear. 

3 Away to the window, to the window she did go 
To see whether he could see his love or no. 

The answer that she made him with the tears all in her eyes. 
She loved the man that loved her and she'd love him till she died. 

4 Away to the wars, to the wars he did go, 

To see whether he could forget his love or no. 

He served one long year, he served his king, 

And in one more long year he returned home again. 

200 



The Lover's Lament 

As he come along his arms were shining bright, 

The most of his thoughts were his own heart's delight. 

When her old mother saw him she wrung her hands and cried, 

Said her daughter loved him dearly and for his sake she died. 

Where does her grave lie, does this lie here ? 
If this does lie here, pray put me by her side. 
Come all you young people and pity poor me, 
Pity my misfortune and sad misery. 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 191 6 



l^± 



:i 



:^ 



I. Now once I did court a most charm - ing beau - ty 




had - n't 






ny rea - son, I'm sure, 



:^=li 



li 



to com - plain. 






w 



2 Then I enlisted, to the army I did go, 
To see if I could forget my love or no. 

But when I got there the army shined so bright, 
On her I placed my whole heart's delight. 

3 Seven long years I served under the king. 
Seven long years I returned home again, 

And when I got there her parents sighed and cried, 

Saying: My daughter dearly loved you and for your sake she died 

4 Then I was struck like a man that was slain. 
The tears from my eyes fell like showers of rain. 
Crying : O-o-o, what shall I do ? 

My true love's in her silent tomb and I wish I was there too. 

201 



The Lover's Lament 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a 4- b 
( dorian ). 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE and Miss Emma Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 10, 1916 



k 



i^ 



-• d 



:2=^ 



-G- 



-(©- 



i 



Don't you re - mem - ber last Fri - day night What you told me when 

LL ^7\ , 



^ • 



-«9- 



- d • dr 



W- 



T= 



sit - ting by my side ? You told me that you loved me so plain- ly in my 



^m 



breast, Ex - cept - ing we got mar - ried, no more can you rest. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Kate Campbell 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 21, 191 6 



d d d d 



^ 



d-^^ d- 



-si— 



Once I court - ed a fair beau - ty bright, I court - ed her by 



i 



i-^r^ 



■Si 



* — ft 



-« — *- 



-« s 



w 



day and I court - ed her by night. I court - ed her for love, And 



I 



5 



^ 



• d- 



-•— ^si- 



• <5) •- 



love I did ob - tain, And I am sure she had not a right to com-plain. 



it 



^ d 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a -f b 
(mixolydian). 



* 



Sung by Mrs. Lizzie Roberts 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



^^ 



^ 



:j J ^- 



a- 



Off to the war. 



to the war I did go. To 

202 



The Lover's Lameut 

(a) 




years I served all in pain, Three long years re - turned home a - gain. 



: #^£!^ ^ 



203 



No. 58 
The Dear Companion 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Ang. 8, 191 6 



[2z 



X 



I. I once did have a dear com- pan - ion; In - deed, I 



i 



-(2- 



->9-r- 



E# 



S 



t: 



thought his love my own, Un - til a black - eyed girl be 




s>-^ 



-?=^- 



t^ 



trayed me. And then he cares 



no more for me. 



2 Just go and leave me if you wish to, 
It will never trouble me, 

For in your heart you love another 
And in my grave I'd rather die. 

3 Last night while you were sweetly sleeping 
Dreaming of some sweet repose, 

While me a poor girl broken, broken hearted, 
Listen to the wind that blows. 

4 When I see your babe a-laughing 

It makes me think of your sweet face, 
But when I* see your babe a-crying 
It makes me think of my disgrace. 



204 



No. 59 

The Rocky Mountain Top 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 10, 1916 



3E^ 



^ ^ 



^^ 



O . don't you re - mem - ber on the rock - y moun - tain top, When 



^ 



^-- 



we sat side by side ? O . . then you pro - mised to 

i^ 1^ — =i 



• — ^ 



• — ^- 



— '- — ^if — ^ — 

mar - ry me, And be 



:!l:^jt=^z=4^=^ 



-<5*-v 



o - ther one's bride. And 



= i— i r h 



be no o - ther one's bride. And be no o - ther one's bride, O 



a 



^ — • 



f=r^ 



::& 



ei 






p 



-^-— bt 



then you pro-mised to mar - ry me, And be no o - ther one's bride. 



20s 



No. 60 

The Warfare is Raging 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 6, 191 6 



p — d— ^- 



f4: 



-•—^ 



I. The war - fare is ra - ging And John - ny you must 



:^==± 



->9- 



4= 



fight. 



I . . want 
Refrain 



to 



be with you From mom - ing 



to 



t==^= 



=i^ 



•—^ 



-9 (Si- 



night.' 



want 



to be with you That grieves . my heart 



m. 



I 



3: 



W 



-K^- 



-<5'-i- 



), Won't you let me go with you? O No, my love, No. 



2 O Johnny, O Johnny, 

I think it's you're unkind, 
When I love you much better 
Than all other mankind. 

3 I'll roach back my hair. 

And men's clothing I'll put on. 
And I'll act as your servant 
As they march along. 

4 I'll go to your general. 
Get down upon my knees. 
Five hundred bright guineas 
I'll give for your release. 

5 She has rings on her fingers 
And bells on her toes 

And she carries music 
Wherever she goes. 



206 



The Warfare is Raging 

6 When you're standing on the picket 
Some cold winter day, 
Them red rosy cheeks 
They will all fade away. 

Them red rosy cheeks, 

That grieves my heart so. 

Won't you let me go with you ? 

O Yes, my love. Yes. 

The refrain is repeated after each stanza, the third line of the stanza in each case 
forming the first tine of the refrain. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 12, 191 6 



lA 



»i 



4=t 



3^3E 



The war was a - ra - ging, Young John - ny has to 



±=M: 



ipii 



m^ -^ -•■ *~ 

fight, And I long to go with him From morn - ing till 



^fel 



i^ 



-^' — • — i^ 



night, I long to go with him, What grieves my heart 



k 



m 



-^ • s 



-m- -g^ -•- 
so. O . may I go with you? O No, my love, No. 



207 



No. 6i 

The True Lover's Farewell 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 10, 191 6 



M 



m 



S=i 



jv^rir 



P=f=S 



^ 



-d — *- 




I. O fare you well, my own true love, So fare you well for 

{a) 



^ ^ p- 



^ 




while; I'm go - ing a -way, but I'm com - ing back 



If I 



a 



S^ 



y^ 



4= 



go ten thousand mile. 



-tr 






w 



2 If I prove false to you, my love, 
The earth may melt and burn, 

The sea may freeze and the earth may burn, 
If I no more return. 

3 Ten thousand miles, my own true love, 
Ten thousand miles or more ; 

The rocks may melt and the sea may burn, 
If I never no more return. 

4 And who will shoe your pretty little feet. 
Or who will glove your hand. 

Or who will kiss your red rosy cheek 
When I'm in the foreign land ? 

5 My father will shoe my pretty little feet. 
My mother will glove my hand, 

And you can kiss my red rosy cheek 
When you return again. 

6 O don't you see yon little turtle dove, 
A-skipping from vine to vine, 
A-mourning the loss of its own true love 
Just as I mourn for mine? 

7 Don't you see yon pretty little girl 
A-spinning on yonder wheel ? 

Ten thousand gay, gold guineas would 1 give 
To feel just like she feels. 

208 



The True Lover's Farewell 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Sulvaney Ramsey 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 1916 



m 



:j: 



'^^^- 



=i 



>=^: 



^=i=it 



t=F=t: 



O don't you see yon tur - tie dove, Lament - ing on yon 



^y. 






d: 



-(^ 



:^^=^ 



^: 



Z S 4 S 



^ 



vine ? She's mourn ing for her own true love ; Why should-n't I mourn for mine ? 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b 
(with sharpened 7th ). 



Sung by Mrs. Ellie Johnson 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 




1 



-\ w — • •- 



I. So far a - way from friends and home,There's one so dear to me, There's 




^^ 



:P=-J: 



-^ — — ,- 



£ 



f=-^ 



:1^ 



one for e - ver in my mind, And that fair one is she, And that fair one is 



j^ 



;b 



-giii^. 



t. 



-•—*!- 



she, There's one for - e - ver in my mind,And that fair one is she. 



2 Come back, come back, my own true love, 
And stay awhile with me, 

For if ever I had a friend on this earth, 
You havfe been a friend to me. 

3 Hush up, hush up, my own true love, 
For I hate to hear you cry ; 

For the best of friends on earth must part, 
And so must you and I. 

4 Don't you see that lonesome dove 
A-flitting from pine to pine ? 

She's mourning for her own true love 
Just like I mourn for mine. 

5 O don't you see the crow fly high ? 
She turns both black and white. 

It ever I prove false to you, 
Bright day shall turn to night. 

209 



The True Lover's Farewell 

6 O take this ring I will to thee 
And wear it on your right hand 
And think of my poor aching heart 
When I'm in some foreign land. 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b 
( with sharpened 7 th ). 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 1916 



^^ 



:d= 



j=^ 



atzz* 



^i^ 



Come in, come in, my old true love, And sit you down by me. For if 



7=^^:jh}-i * 



^- 



^E£ 



-t5>-i 



ev - er I had a friend on earth You have been a friend to me. 



210 



No. 62 



Katie Morey 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 



>A^i=±^. 



■^i^t 



I. Come youngjCome old, come all draw nigh, Come lis - ten to my sto - ry. I'll 



^ 



-#-=-^-f*- 



E 



tell you what a plan I've found To spoil Miss Ka - tie Mo - rey. My 

I I (a) 



-A- 



:t: 



— N , 



•—4 



:4: 



too 



I - ree 1 



My too I - ree I 






2 I went unto her father's house 
Just like a clever fellow, 

I told her that the plums and grapes were ripe, 
Yes, they were fine and mellow. 

3 She says : My dear, my dearest dear, 
There's something else to betray us, 
My father dear is on his way, 

And he'll be sure to see us. 

4 But if the highest tree it's you could climb, 
Till he gets out of sight, sir. 

It's then we'll go to yonders grove 
And spend one happy hour. 

5 The tree was rough, he climbed so tough, 
And on the top he stopped, sir. 

And every jerk he tore his shirt, 
And on the top he stopped, sir. 

6 As she went trippling over the plains. 
She looked so neat and active. 

And there he sot in the top of the tree 
Almost raving distracted. 

211 



Katie Morey 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, 
a + b (no 6th j. 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, i9i( 



& 



=1 j- 



-^ 



-^ 



=F 



--VElt^ 



ltd 



I. Come all you fair and ten - der la - dies, Come lis - ten to my 



i=3 



:^ 



&::M 



^ 



^ 



sto - ry, I've laid for to fool Miss Ka - tie Mo - rey. To my 



g 



:A=rt 



t^ 



fct 



1 



lie twad -de - ling die - ay, To my lie twad-de - ling die 



ott 




I 






V'T 


^_ • ^ 


1 


(i\ ^1 


n 


/ m P 


P f P m 


r^ ' 1 m P 


2, ^ • m 


\(\ m \ ■ 






'J 1 




J^l • ^_ 


\ — 1 1 1 1 




A \ 


A 



2. He went un - to her fa - ther's house, Just like a 



cle - ver 



:fa=i 



S=, 



^ 



^^ 



a 



fel - low. He told her that the grapes and plums Were get - ting ripe and 



4: 



m 



-fs — N. 



fc^ 



-A — ^■ 



«: 



^=^ 



±d:2z^ 



mel - low. To my lie twad-de- ling die - ay, To my lie twad-de- ling die - o. 

T/ie rest of the verses are sung like the second verse with the exception of the fourth, 
in 7vhich the first four lines are sttng as in the second verse and the remaining three as 
in the first. 



3 He told her that his sister Anne 
Was down in yonders valley, 

And wanted her for to come down there 
And spend one half an hour. 

4 As they went sporting through the fields 

She squeezed his hand and seemed well pleased. 

There ain't but one thing I fear, sir, 

And that is my old father, 

And he's down this way and he'll see us here together. 

I'll go and strive to climb yonder tree 

Till he get's away, sir. 

212 



Katie Morey 

5 She stood and gazed upon him 
For to see how high he 'scended. 
Your ugly looks I do disdain ; 
You look just like an owl, sir. 

6 You may eat your grapes and suck your stems, 
For I am a-going to the house, sir. 

And every time she looks at me and smiles, 
It makes me think of climbing. 



213 



No. 63 

Rain and Snow 



Pentatonic. Mode 4 
( with sharpened 7th ). 



Sung by Mrs. ToM RiCE 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 18, 1916 



H — J h 



^ 



:& 



l± 



-• • d 



•zzit 



:fci: 



Lord ! I mar - ried me a wife, She gave me trou - ble all my 



:^ 



i^ 



ntZit 



-f— ^ 



^- 



V- 



r- 



F^l 



life ; Made me work in the cold rain and snow, Rain and 



^ 



^: 



& 



I 



a 



itiit 



-7^ 



snow, rain and snow, Made me work in the cold rain and snow. 



& 



-•— ^ 



-«>-?■ 



I 



214 



No. 64 

The Wagoner's Lad 




Hexatonic. Major Mode (no 7th). 



Sung by Miss MEMORY Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 



^-it 



4-* 



3: 



^bzt 



-■^ 



I. On top of old Smo-key, All cov - ered in snow, I 



^^m 



i 



^ 



lost my true 



lov - er 



By 



spark - ing too slow. 



2 Sparking is pleasure, 
Parting is grief, 

And a false-hearted lover 
Is worse than a thief. 

3 A thief will only rob you. 
Will take what you have, 
And a false-hearted lover 
Will take you to the grave. 

4 The grave will only decay you, 
Will turn you to the dust. 

There is not one girl out of a hundred 
A poor boy can trust. 

5 They will tell you they love you 
To give your heart ease, 

And as soon as you back up on them 
They'll court who they please. 

6 It's a-raining, it's a-hailing. 
The moon it gives no light, 
Your horses can't travel 
This dark, lonesome night. 

7 Go put up your horses. 
Feed them some hay ; 

Come sit down here by me, love, 
As long as you stay. 

8 My horses are not hungry. 
Won't eat your hay, 

So farewell, my little darling, 
I'll feed on my way. 

215 



The Wagoner's Lad 

9 I will drive on to Georgia, 
Write you my mind ; 
My mind is to marry, love, 
And leave you behind. 

10 Your parents is against me. 
Mine is the same. 

If I'm down on your book, love, 
Please rub off my name. 

1 1 I go upon old Smokey 
On the mountain so high, 

Where the wild birds and the turtle doves 
Can hear my sad cries. 

12 As soon as the dewdrops 
Grow on the green grass. 
Last night she was with me, 
But to-night she is gone. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 




tzt 



^ 



m 



Sung by Miss ZiLPHA Robinson 
at Clay Co., Ky., 1908 

I I I 



:i 



#— •-^- 



4^=r^- 



I. I am . a poor girl and my for - tune's been bad, So oft - times I've been 



i 



:|^=^ 



:B 



:l3t 



^z 



A — \ — I =F=^ 



court -ed by a wag- on - er's lad. He court - ed me du - ly by 



s 



-#-^« 



night and by day, And now for to leave me he's go - ing a - way. 



2 So early next morning I did arise, 

A crossing deep waters with tears in my eyes. 
Your horses are hungry, go feed them some hay. 
So come and stand by me so long you do stay 

3 My horses are not hungry, they won't eat your dry hay. 
So fare you well, loving Nancy, I have no time to stay. 
Your horse is to saddle, your wagon's to grease, 
Come sit you down by me before you do leave. 

216 



The Wagoner's Lad 

4 My horses are saddled, my whip's in my hand, 

So fare you well, loving Nancy, I've no time to stand. 
Your parents don't like me because I am poor, 
They say I'm not worthy of entering their door. 

5 Some day they will rue it, but they will rue it in vain, 
For love it is a killing, a tormenting pain. 

I must go and leave you to see you no more. 
I left her a-weeping on the new river shore. 

6 I can love little, or I can love long, 

I can love an old sweetheart till a new one comes on ; 
I can hug and I can kiss them and prove to them kind, 
I can turn my back upon them and also my mind. 



Pentatonic. Mode i 



Sung by Mrs. Kitty Gwynne 
at Flag Pond, Tenn , Sept 5, 1916 




I. Fare - well to 



the white house, My Lu - lu . . it's too, Fare - 



I 



r- 



-• — ^ 



Hi: 



^^^S 



^^^ 



well to . . John-ny Car - gill, I'm go- ing for to leave you. 

^0 




2 I came to his city 
To stay for a while. 

I left my dear people 
A many of a long mile. 

3 It's raining, it's hailing, 
The stars give no light. 
My horses can't travel 
This dark lonesome night. 

4 Go put up your horses. 
And feed them some hay ; 
Come sit down beside me 
As long as you stay. 

217 



The Wagoner's Lad 

5 My horses ain't hungry, 
They can't eat your hay ; 
I'll drive on to Georgia 
And feed on the way. 

6 It's when I get to Georgia, 
I'll write you my mind. 
My mind is to marry 
And leave you behind. 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 




d: 



d\z 



I. In old North Car - o - 11 - na I was bred and was born, And 



=S-=P= 



-k— U- 1 



-* — •- 



-j^ — • 



in my own coun- ty I was a great scorn. As I was a - rid - ing one 




•>, N- 



mom-ing in May, I met as fair dam - sel as you e - ver might see. 



2 I viewed her features and she pleased me well ; 
I forced all on her my mind for to tell. 

She quickly consented my bride for to be, 

But her parents wasn't willing for she to have me. 

3 I am a poor girl and my fortune is bad, 

And I've duly been courted by the wagoner lad, 
I've duly been courted by night and by day, 
But now he's a-loaded, he's going away. 

4 Your horses is hungry, go feed them some hay, 
Come set down beside me, is all I can say. 

My horses ain't hungry, they won't eat your hay, 
So farewell, pretty Nancy, I've no time to stay. 

5 Your horses is not geared up, nor your whip in your hand, 
Come set you down by me, just at my command. 

My horses is geared up, my whip in my hand. 
So farewell, pretty Nancy, I've no time to stand. 

218 



The Wagoner's Lad 

6 I've duly been courted by day and by night, 
I've duly been courted by the wagoner lad. 
But now he's loading, he's going away ; 
But if ever I meet him, I'll crown him with joy, 
And kiss the sweet lips of my wagoner boy. 



219 



No. 65 

Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies 



Hexatonic : Mode 4, a* 



Sung by Mrs. Rosie Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 



-N N- 



^Z 



i2z=^ 



tt=F 



t^=±' 



-25)- 



I, O don't you re-mem - ber on yon green moun -tain, Where I and 



d2: 



^^ 



Q= 



-^ 



^ 



i-tt 



you first fell in love, Where the lit - tie birds was sweet - ly 



ffi 



^=^r~T^ - 



^^ 



=t 



i 



smg - ing 



And e - ven, too, 
(a) 



the 



lit 



tie doves ? 



,d2 



gfcl: 



:^ 1- 



I 



-g- • - 

2 Come all ye fair and tender ladies, 
Be careful how you court young men ; 
They're like a star of a summer's morning. 
They'll first appear and then they're gone. 

3 They'll tell to you some pleasing story, 
They'll declare to you they are your own ; 
Straightway they'll go and court some other 
And leave you here in tears to mourn. 

4 I wish I were a little swallow 
And I had wings and I could fly ; 
Straight after my true love I would follow. 
When they'd be talking I'd be by. 

5 But I am no little swallow, 

I have no wings, nor I can't fly. 
And after my true love I can't follow, 
And when they're talking I'll set and cry. 



There's many a dark and rainy morning 
Turns out to be a pretty day. 

* If Bb be tonic : — Mode 3, a. 

220 



Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode I. 



Sung by two girls in Knott Co., Ky. 



=t 



'd=d: 



i^: 



-0— — • 0- 



1. Come all you young and ten - der la - dies, . Take warn - ing 

I N — -N -r^^ N- 



^ 



-^^S^£ 



how you court young men. They're like a bright star in a cloud - y 

— N- 



::i=t 



morn - ing; 



:t: 



:t: 



i. 



They'll first ap - pear and then they're gone. 



^1 



2 They'll tell to you some lovely story 
And tell you their love is true, 
Straightway to some other girl and court her, 
And that's the love they have for you. 

3 I wish I were a little sparrow. 

Had sparrow's wings and I could fly ; 
I would fly away to my false true-love, 
And while he would talk I would deny. 

4 But I am not a little sparrow, 
Got no wings, nor I can't fly ; 

I will sit right down in grief and sorrow 
And try to pass my troubles by. 

5 If I had knowed before I courted 
That love had been so hard to win, 

I'd locked my heart with the keys of golden, 
And pinned it down with a silver pin. 



H^ptatonic. Mode 4, a-fb (dorian). 



Sung by Mrs. Press Blankenship 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 191 6 



g 



s 



S: 



=F= 



£ 



-i5'-j- 



i 



--^^ 



— ^ — • — ^ 

I. Come all you fair and ten- der la - dies, Be care-ful how you court young 






:± 



:i 



-^ m- 



■<2- 



-• — rJ d 



&A 



I 



men. They're like a star of a summer's morning,They first appear and then they're gone. 

221 



Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies 

2 They'll tell to you some pleasing story, 
Declare to you they love you well, 
Then go away and court them another, 
And that's the love they have for you. 

3 I once did meet a fair true lover, 
A true one, too, I took him to be ; 

And then he went away and found him another, 
And that's the love he had for me. 

4 O that I were a pretty little swallow, 
Or had I wings that I could fly, 

Then away after my true love I'd follow, 
I'd light upon his breast and flutter 
And tell him of deceiving me. 

5 I hope there is a day a-coming 
Wher love shall put an end to me. 
I hope there is a place of torment 
To secure my love for deceiving me. 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 




Sung by Mrs. CoATES 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 2, 1916 



t 



J=± 



i 



s 



-%—• 



^ . — I — _ , ^ — 

Come all you fair, young, ten - der la - dies. Take warn-ing how you court young 



i 



ir>— 



:z5^ 



-4 — ~- ' ^—^ -*— 2^ ^ 

men.They're like a star in a sunlight morning; They'll first appear and then they're gone. 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a.* 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 



^ 



% -• 



- U— i ^-^ 



^- 



If I had a -known be - fore I'd a -court- ed 



^E 



-ri- 



^^^ 



would have court - ed none; I'd have locked my heart in a box of 



i 



d^ 



S 



i d • =»^ 



gold - en. And a - fas - tened it up with a sil - ver pin. 

* If C be tonic : — Mode 3, a. 

222 



No. 66 

Ibby Damsel 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 






:=1= 



•—J — J- 



yji 



fcEi 



:?c*" 



gEEE^ 



I. Some old Ro - bin Down they call me, But I'm a weav - er by my 



^p^^^ 



:=|: 



i^P 



^ 



:t: 



trade In this fair berth, in which I'm dwelling ; And Ib-by Dam-sel my heart betrayed. 

2 Her hair's as black as a raven's feather 
That do sit on yon willow tree, 

Her sparkling eyes they're so enticing ; 
But from her chamber I can't get free. 

3 Her heart as sweet as any posy. 
Her cheeks are of the rosy red, 
Her sparkling eyes are so enticing, 

Her eyebrows wove with a golden thread. 



223 



No. &] 



Hand; 



anasome 



Sally 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. ToM RiCE 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 16, 19 16 



PiE&^ 



3^ 



s 



I. My fa-therowns a large es - tate, He's willed it all to me of 




e 



3 



late, And mas-ter of it you shall be If you con -sent tomar-ry me. 

2 O madam, I cannot marry you. 

For with handsome Sally I vowed an oath, 
O madam, I cannot marry you both. 

3 And then from shore they all did ride, 
Handsome Sally to be his bride. 
While handsome Sally lay fast asleep 

This wretched lady plunged her into the deep. 

4 O then from shore they all did ride. 
This wretched lady to be his bride. 

Such troubled thoughts rolled across her breast 
Until the truth she did confess. 

5 Young people, don't do as I have done ; 
I've ruined myself and the farmer's son. 
And this fair lady distracted run ; 

At home in bed lies the farmer's son. 



224 



No. 68 

William and Polly 




Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



-=^Eii 






I. Sweet Wil - Ham went 



to 




Pol 

{a) 



ly To give her to un - der 



=2=^:r=tia 



H-«J- 



-^ . ^ 



4^m 



f f f9—^-^- 



P 



Stand That he had to go and leave her To go to a f or-eign land. 

('0 



\rK 



S? 



^^ 







2 O stay at home, Sweet William, 
O stay at home, said she ; 

stay at home. Sweet William, 
And do not go to sea. 

3 My king doth give command, my love, 
And I am bound to go ; 

If it was to save my life, 

1 dare not answer No. 

4 I'll cut my hair, love, paint my skin, 
And men's apparel put on. 

I will go with you, Sweet William, 
And sail on sea with you. 

5 The men do lie bleeding there 
And the bullets swiftly fly, 

And the silver trumpets a-sounding 
To drown the dismal cry. 

6 O tell me of no death nor danger. 
For God will be my guide. 

And I value not no danger 
When William's by my side. 

7 O if I was to meet some pretty girl 
All on the highway, 

And was to take a like unto her, 
What would my Polly say ? 

225 



William and Polly 

8 My Polly she'd be angry 
Although I love her too. 

I'd step aside, Sweet William, 
That she might comfort you. 

9 O my charming Polly, 

These words has gained my heart, 
And we will have a wedding 
Before we ever part. 

[Q This couple they got married, 
And William's gone on sea, 
And Polly's she's a-waiting 
In their own country. 



226 



No. 69 
Hicks's Farewell 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 
(a) 



Sung by Mr. Silas Shelton 
at Spillcorn, N. C, Sept. 6, 1916 




I. The time's been sweet I've spent with you, The time's beenrol- ling by, . But 

(^) , , , 



-(^- 



m^ 



* — s 1- 



^^ 



:i 



-I • ^ <&- 



-1^ 



now we'll part to meet no more Till we . ar - rive at home. 

00 r. ib) 



i 



-- A X 



•— «— • 



;h 



2 Oft-times you've looked for me, my love, 
Oft-times you've see'd me come, 

But now we'll part to meet no more 
Till we do arrive at home. 

3 My little children's dear to me 
And Nature seems to bind ; 

So dearest wife, entreat them well 
And raise them in God's fear. 

4 Farew-ell, my brother-preachers all, 
I'll bid you all farewell ; 

So now we'll part to meet no more 
Till we shall meet at home. 



227 



No. 70 
Poor Omie 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 




Sung by Mr. Hilliard Smith 
at Hindman, Ky., Aug. 16, 1909 



=F=^=^ 



2=?.±=S 



^ 






p 



I. You pro-mised to meet me 



at 



A - dams - 's spring ; Some 



s^ 



2ifc 



I 



=^= 



:t: 



i§i 



^: 



i^: 



mo - ney you would bring me, 



Or 



some oth - er fine thing. 



2 No money, no money. 
To flatter the case, 
We'll go and get married, 
It will be no digrace. 

3 Come jump up behind me 
And away we will ride 
To yonder fair city ; 

I will make you my bride. 

4 She jumped up behind him 
And away they did go 

To the banks of deep waters 
Where they never overflow. 

5 O Omie, O Omie, 

I will tell you my mind ; 
My mind is to drown you 
And leave you behind. 

6 O pity 1 O pity 1 
Pray spare me my life. 
And I will deny you 
And not be your wife. 

7 No pity, no pity, 
No pity have I ; 

In yonder deep water 
Your body shall lie. 

8 He kicked her and stomped her, 
He threw her in the deep ; 

He jumped on his pony 
And rode at full speed. 

228 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Poor Omie 

9 The screams of poor Omie 
Followed after him so nigh, 
Saying : I am a poor rebel 
Not fitten to die. 

10 She was missing one evening, 
Next morning was found 

In the bottom of Siloty 
Below the mill dam. 

11 Up stepped old Miss Mother, 
These words she did say : 
James Luther has killed Omie 
And he has run away. 

12 He has gone to Elk River, 
So I understand, 

They have got him in prison 
For killing a man. 

13 They have got him in Ireland, 
Bound to the ground ; 

And he wrote his confession 
And sent it around. 

14 Go hang me or kill me. 
For I am the man 

That drowned little Omie 
Below the mill dam. 



B 



Sung by Mrs. Riley Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 1916 



m^ 



1^- 



^=PEE3E3 



What a sor - row - ful dit - ty of poor O - mie Wise, How she got de 



-^ ^^^-^ 



i^ 



i 



it=t 



lu - ded by George Lew - is - 's lies; She pro-mis'd she'd meet him at 

(a) 



-T5*- 



EE 



tti 



_H-^_u» 



-0 ^ 



S^ 



A - dams - 's spring Some mo - ney he'd give her and oth - er fine thing. 

229 



Poor Omie 



i'^) 



=^ 



a^ 



3= 



sy 



i 



Pentatonic. Mode 4. 



Sung by Mrs. Tom Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 191 6 



* 



& 



-f=Jltl 



§^4=*=^ f=t=^^ p=^=u^ 



^7»— p= 



s 



J±it 



-^ — ^ — • 

He kicked her, he choked her, as we un - der - stand,Then throwed her in deep 



W—T^ 


— ! M — ^— 


— p 


1 - 
— d f— 




-^rt* 


— • — 


— h — b — ' 


^W^!—*- 


— m — 


- 1^ 




« 


1 — &> — 


-4 


— — 


_3stit_ 


-^— 


V "^ 



wa - ter be - low yon mill dam. Then O - mie were mis - sing . and by 



i 



=F^t= 



^ — ft- 



3 



^ 



^Pl 



no means could be found, And peo - pie to hunt her they all gath- ered round. 



230 



No. 71 



The Virginian Lover 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug, 28, 19 16 



• — • ^ ' -j-0 — ^ 



^# 



^^ 



^g=w^ 



Y^^=^-9- 



:ij: 



I. I am a gay young gen - tie - man from old Vir - gin - ia came, I 



=E=EEE 



^ 



£ 



^- 



i^ 



^=F 



court - ed a fair dam - sel and Pol - ly was her name. I 



^ E=^=F 



V- 



:p: 



gain - ed her af - fee - tion and plain - ly it did show ; But her 



-t— • ^ • 



E=E 



:1: 



-s^ 



^ 



— — * — -J- 

self - con - ceit - ed bro - ther he . proved her o - ver - throw. 

(a) 



i 



w 



-ri- 



I 



2 What's the matter, pretty Polly, what makes you look so sad ? 
Have I given you any reason, love, or caused you to be mad ? 
If I give ycu any reason, love, it never was my intent. 
Pray tell to me, pretty Polly, what makes you so lament ? 



231 



No. 72 



Early, Early in the Spring 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a -|- b 
( Ionian ).* 



:=1: 



Sung by Mr. Mitchell Wallin 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 19 16 



^ 



=]: 



^ 



•— #— ^ 



-25*- 



-4- 



I. One morn - ing, one morn - ing in the Spring, I went to 



^=^ 



3 



-^—» — ^ - 



£ 



^— i= 



f: 



-y- 



sea to serve my king, A - leav - ing my fair prom - i - ses in 



i 



B 



-f^ 



t^ 



:P 



break, Who 



of 



ten 

(a) 



said 



she 



would be 



^^m 



2 I hadnt been gone but a very short while, 
I took the opportunity 

Of writing of letters to my most dear, 
Not an answer could I hear. 

3 I rode up to her father's hall, 
Where my true love I did call. 

Her father answered and thus replied : 

My daughter's married and you must be denied. 

4 She married to a richer life, 
You'll have to seek another wife. 
Cruel be all gold and silver 

And all true love that won't prove true. 

5 They will occasion you to swear 

And break the heart of a nice young man. 
I'll go where the fife and the drums do play, 
Where the music ceases night or day. 
Live on the sea till the dear day 
And split the waves with bullets fly. 

6 O Willie dear, lay still on shore 
And don't go about the rigging o'er. 
There's girls in the town more fair than I, 
O Willie, don't go where the bullets fly. 

• If D be tonic : — Mode 2, a + b ( aeolian ) . 

232 



Early, Early in the Spring 



B 




Pentatonic. Mode 4, b 
(with sharpened 7th; no 2nd). 






:d: 






:d: 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 

^ (*) 



^1 



I. So ear - ly, ear - ly 




in the Spring, I went on . board to serve my 



i\ 



^r- 



;e 



te 



-^ — #- 



f:±i 



3 



S: 



3: 



-2o 



King, A-leav-ing of my love be-hind. Who al-ways told me her heart was mine. 

Si 



^^1 



l=i; 



^S3#3 



U 



r 



2 When I came back to her father's hall, 
Enquiring for my jewel all, 

Her cruel old father this replied : 
Her mamma says O if you deny. 

3 O she has married another man, 
A richer man for all his life, 

A richer man for all his life, 

O he has made her his lawful wife. 

4 O God curse gold and silver too 

And all false women that won't prove true ; 
For some will take and then will break 
All for the sake of richeree. 

5 O stop, young man, don't talk too fast, 
The fault is great, but none of mine ; 
The fault is great, but none of mine ; 
Don't speak so hard of the female kind. 

6 O if you had gold you might have part, 

But as I have none you have gained my heait; 
You have gained it all with a free good will, 
So keep my vows and hold them still. 

7 O since hard fortune around me frowns, 
I'll sail the ocean around and around ; 
I'll sail the ocean till I die, 

I'll quit my ways on a mountain high. 

233 



Early, Early in the Spring 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Suug by Mr. W. Riley Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 191 6 




=1= 



-^- 



Sweet Wil- liam,don't you cross that ra - ging sea, You can stay at 



m 



& 



:^=tc 



=t 



^^^- 



V V 



-iS'-r- 



m 



home, Sweet Wil - Ham, with me ; For there are girls in the 
(a) 



:i 



=j: 



• — *i- 



^ 



•X 



i 



^ 



J=J=M±-^ 



town more fair than I, Don't cut your ways where the bul - lets fly. 
(a) 






:^=H«= 



=1: 



:^^5 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



m 



D 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept, 14, 1916 



si- 



So ear - ly, ear - ly in the Spring Sweet Wil-liam went to serve his 



^■ 



=a= 



:|M^ 



P 



-±3t 



-V— u 



^—^- 

King; With an aching heart and a torn-up mind To leave his dar - ling girl be- hind. 



234 



No. 73 

Married and Single Life 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 3, 1916 



5# 



F=^= 



1^==^ 



EJziai 



^ 



^ #^ 



d S \ sJ- 



=F= 



I. Come all ye young peo - pie and lis - ten to me, I'm go - ing to 



g 



W 



E 



- d I d 



-y — V- 



tell you my sad des - ti - ny. I'm a man by ex - pe ■ rience whose 



I 



E 



-(2- 



Pi^^ 



^ L g^- 



fa-vours is won; Love has been the ru - in of ma - ny a man. 



2 If you go to get married', don't hasten it on, 

And don't you get married till you're full twenty-one ; 
And don't you get married till you find your love set, 
Then marry some good girl your love won't forget. 

3 Come all you young gentlemen who want to be smart, 
Don't place your affections on a smiling sweetheart. 
She's dancing before you some favours to gain. 
Then turns her back on you with scorn and disdain. 

4 When a man's married he ain't his own man, 

He must rove through the country and live as he can. 
He's lost that sweet apparel, the flowers of life. 
For selling his freedom to buy him a wife. 

5 But when a man's single he can live at his ease. 

He can rove through the country and do as he please ; 
He can rove through the country and live at his will. 
Kiss Polly, kiss Betsy, and he is the same still. 

6 Just pour out another bowl, boys, we'll drink bumpers round. 
We'll drink to the poorest, if they're to be found ; 

We'll drink to the single with the greatest success, 
Likewise to the married and wish them no less. 



235 



No. 74 



Betsy 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mr. Mitchell Wallin 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 1916 




-^-^W 



I. O Bet - sy 



be 



la - dy fair, Just sail - ed. 



F:;^lji=^ 


— 1 — y\w — • — 


— ' III 

4 W •4}j ^^ \ A 1 — 


^ f? . '1 h^ 


-• 


F4 


:<^iJ=L= 


— ^— tl^ 


^. ' 1 ''r r- 


— ¥- 


^ d — 


9 - * "1 


S 



o - ver from Lon - don there. A ser-vant's maid she is 

-Tn 3 



^tt# 



*2- 



^ 



bound to me ; Which suit - ed Bet 



sy 



to a high de - gree. 



2 There were a carpenter who had a son, 
And Betsy's beauty shines so clear. 

It drawed his heart all in a snare. 

3 As they was talking on the bed, 

He said : Betsy, Betsy, I love you dear 

And I intend to make you my wife. 

So here's old mother. Dear mother rose up. 

4 Come Betsy, Betsy, come go with me. 
Come wait on me one day or two. 

So when his dear mother returned back. 

He says : Dear mother, you're welcome back, 

But what keeps Betsy so long behind ? 

5 O son, O son, said she. 

Your love to Betsy's great, I see, 

But you may love no more, for your love's in vain, 

For Betsy's sailing on the main. 

6 O he looked sad and hung down his head. 

And all the mirth it died, wouldn't make him glad. 
He was heard to cry in slumbering dream : 
O Betsy, Betsy, for you I die. 

7 He sent for doctors for one year 
To try their skill. 

Dear doctor, your skill's in vain, 
There's none like Betsy to save my pain. 

236 



Betsy 

8 No sooner than breath went out of her son, 
She wrung her hands, tore down her hair. 
If my son had his breath again, 
I'd fetch Betsy from over the main. 



237 



No. 75 

If You Want to Go A-courting 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 5, 1916 



i 



ii=^ 



ifc 



^- 



¥^ 



i 



I. If you want to go a - court - ing, I'll tell you where to go, 



1^=t^ 



r=i= 



ig 



£ 



Just down yon - der, just down be - low. Thfe old man, old wo - man 



^ 



^^ 



:± 



t=^ 



-A — ^- 



ril: 



gone from the home, And the girls all mad with their heads not combed, And the 



H 



girls 
(a) 



all . . 



mad 



-0- -0- 

with their 



heads 



not 



combed. 



j^^iigE^ 



tan - gle my fin - gers with the 



2 They hain't got sense to bake a pound of bread. 
They'll throw on a log heap as high as my head, 
They'll rake out the ashes and then they'll throw 
A little some of what's called dough, boys, dough. 

3 They'll milk the old cow and they'll milk her in a gourd 
And set it in a corner and covered with a board. 

And that's the best that I got there, 
All along on a missionary fair. 

4 Hey, old lady, you'd better run, 

Yonder comes your daddy with the doubled barreled gun. 

I'll stand my ground as brave as a bear, 

I'll tangle my fingers with the old man's hair. 



238 



No. ^^ 

Pretty Saro 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 ( tonic G ). 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 5, 1916 




I. When I first came to this coun - try in eight - een and for - ty 




tS=i 



pi 



~^—j^ 



nine, 



ma - ny fair lov - ers, but I ne - ver saw 




3=3 



round me, I . . found my - self 



I 



:i 



^ 



lone, And me a poor stran - ger and a long way from home. 



2 My love she won't love me, yes, I do understand, 
She wants a freeholder and I've got no land. 
But plenty to maintain her on, silver and gold 

And as many other fine things as my love's house can hold. 

3 Farewell to my mother and adieu to my old father, too, 
I am going to ramble this whole world all through ; 
And when I get tired I'll set down and weep 

And think on my darling, pretty Saro, my sweet. 

4 Down in some lonesome valley, down in some lone place. 
Where the small birds do whistle their notes to increase ; 
But when I get sorrow, I'll set down and cry 

And think ot my darling, my darling so nigh. 

5 I wish I were a poet and could write some fine hand, 

I would write my love a letter that she might understand ; 
I would send it by the water where the island overflow. 
And I'd think of my darling wherever I go. 

6 I wish I were a dove and had wings and could fly ; 
This night to my love's window I would draw nigh. 
And in her lily-white arms all night I would lay 

And watch them little windows to the dawning of day. 

239 



Pretty Saro 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 ( tonic G ) 



Sung by Miss Mackinney, 
Habersham Co., Ga., May 28, 1910 



3 



3? 



et 



~m 



-s — • 



if.:=it 



=i=J 



-i— ,•- 



I . came to this coun - try in . eight - een - for - ty - nine, I 



^^ 



t=^- 



=*— IT 



^^^ 



■&-- 



saw so ma - ny lov - ers, but ne - ver saw mine. I viewed all a 



:f^ 



i^: 



:i] 



-^ — * 



^^=M=M=^zf=M=f^it 



round me and saw I was a - lone ; And me a poor sol-dier and far from my home. 

2 It is not the long journey I'm dreading to go, 
Nor leaving the country for the debts that I owe ; 
There's nothing that grieves me nor troubles my mind 
Like leaving pretty Sarah, my darling, behind. 

3 I wish I was a poet that could write a fine hand, 
I'd write my love a letter that she might understand. 
I'd send it by the waters, where the island overflows, 
And think on pretty Sarah wherever I go. 

4 And I wish I was a little dove, had wings and could fly ; 
Right to my love's dwelling this night I would fly. 

And in her lily-white arms all night I would lie. 
And out some little window next morning I would fly. 

5 Farewell, my dear father, likewise mother too ; 
I am going to ramble this country all through ; 
And when I get tired, I'll sit down and cry, 
And think on pretty Sarah with tears in my eyes. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b (tonic G ). 




Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 12, 1916 



;i 



:i 



t 



m 



f=t-r 



-,j_,_Lr g d^J-^- ^- 1^ ^ — »-^5^ *Hf 

I came to this coun - try in eight-een - for - ty- nine, I saw man - y true 

240 



Pretty Saro 



f=i* 



^ 



-25^- 






=& 



lov - ers, but I nev - er saw mine. I looked all a - round me and I 



S 



I 



-A — ^ 



-1^— • 



-^—f^ 



J=i= 



-^ — •- 



tj 



saw I were a - lone ; And me a poor Strang - er a long way from home. 



241 



No. 77 



My Dearest Dear 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 5, 1916 



li 



w 



=t 



^=»: 



i 



I. My dear - est dear, the time draws near When I and you must part ; And 



Id t^-- 



i 



W^- 



^ 



^- 



^ 



no one knows the in-ner grieves Of my poor ach - ing heart. To 




^ 



5 



i=t 



3 



=F 



2^- 



^ 



see what I suf-fered for your sake, You are who I love so dear, I'd 



W 



i 



=t 



-,H IJ 



^ 



^l 



here. 



ra - ther I could go with you Or you could tar - ry 

2 O my old mother's hard to leave, 
My father's on my mind, 

But for your sake I'll go with you 

And leave them all behind. 

But for your sake I'll go with you, 

O mother, fare you well. 

For fear I never see you any more 

While here on earth we dwell. 

3 I wish your breast was made of glass, 
All in it I might behold ; 

Your name in secret I would write 

In letters of bright gold. 

Your name in secret I would write. 

Pray believe in what I say, 

You are the man that I love best 

Unto my dying day. 

4 But when you are on some distant shore. 
Think on your absent friend, 

And when the wind blows high and clear, 
A line or two, pray send. 
And when the wind blows high and clear, 
Pray send it, love, to me, 
That I may know by your own hand-write 
How times has went with thee. 
242 



No. 78 



Fm Going to Georgia 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Miss Stella Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, July 29, 1916 






3: 



:^ 



s 




=^"=F= 



E4 



I. I'm go - ing to Geor - gia, I'm go - ing to 



roam, I'm 



=F= 



H 



go - ing to Geor - gia to make it my home. 

2 I once loved a young man as dear as my life, 
And he oft-times did promise to make me his wife. 

3 The promise he fulfilled and he made me his wife, 
And you see what I've come to by believing his lies. 

4 Come all ye fair ladies, take warning by me, 
Never cast your affections on a green growing tree. 

5 The leaves they may wither, the flowers they may die, 
Some young man may fool you as one has fooled 1. 



243 



No. 79 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 




Harry Gray 



Sung by Mrs. Dora Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 2, 1916 



=1-^ 



lizzt 



I. Shevvasjust as kind and good to me As a - ny wo - manneeded to 




:=t 



t=^^=s: 



^^3 



• s s - 



f 



=t 



-0—g 



•-^si^ 



be ; And would have been this very day, If I had -n't met Miss Harry Gray. 



2 She was young and in her prime, 

And for her dress that she wore were style. 
She stole my heart, she took my will 
And my poor wife she caused me to kill. 

3 I would give my gold and store, 

This whole wide world and a thousand more, 

If I could live one happy life 

And bring back my poor murdered wife. 



244 



No. 80 

Locks and Bolts 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a.* 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 8, 1916 




i2ze: 



g 



=^ 



nt 



:=1: 



S^ 



I. Come, An - na May, and tell me your name, I'm talk-ing a - bout my 




||r:i--4==|N=^ 



-^ — ^- 



-«'-5- 



v~ 



^^ 



•rr-f-^ 



A=^. 



J=^2=^ 



:2: 



ta: 



:^= 




dar-ling. She's the lit-tle one I . . love so well, She's almost the com - plete one. 

M {a) a I ?i I ^ !. 



^- 



^- 



-Jt=±L 



E 



-^^ 



•=rjt 



-t 



2 Her yellow hairs, like glittering gold. 
Come jingling down her pillow. 
She's the little one I love so well, 
She's like the weeping willow. 

3 You've caused your parents to owe me a grudge 
And treat me most unkindly, 

Because you're of some high degree 
And me so poor and needy. 

4 I went up to her uncle's house, 
Enquiring of my darling. 

And all they would say : There's no such here. 
And then O what weeping 1 

5 But when she heard my lonely voice, 
She answered at the window, 

Saying : I would be with you soon, my love, 
But locks and bolts doth hinder. 

6 I stood for a moment all in a maze, 
I viewed her long and tenderly ; 
My spirit flew, my sword I drew, 

I swore that house I'd enter. 

7 The blood was shed from every side 
Till I got her from among them. 

And all young men who get such wives 
Should fight till you overcome them. 

• If D be tonic : — Mode 3, a. 

245 



Locks and Bolts 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian ). 




Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



^ 



it 



^iMi 



tS 



a 



I. I dreamed of my true love last night, All in my arms I had her, But 



when I woke it was a dream ; I was forced to lay with - out her. 



2 Her yellow hair, like strands of gold, 
Come rolling down my pillow ; 

Her yellow hair, like strands of gold, 
Come rolling down my pillow. 

3 I went unto her uncle's house 
Enquiring for my darling. 

The answer was : She is not here, 
I've no such in my keeping. 

4 Her voice from the roof above 
Came straightway to the window. 
O love, O love, it's I'd be yours, 
But locks and bolts doth hinder. 

5 O passion flew, my sword I drew, 
All in that room I entered ; 

O passion flew, my sword I drew. 
All in that room I entered. 

6 I took my sword in my right hand, 
And my love all in the other. 

Come all young men that love like me. 
Fight on and take another. 

7 Her uncle and three other men 
Straightway after me did follow. 

Saying : Leave this room, you villain, you, 
Or in your heart's blood you shall wallow. 



Pentatonic. Mode 4.* 



Sung by Miss Linny Landers 
at Carmen, N. C, Sept. 5, 1916 



m 



d: 



S 



^ 



I rode up to her un 

* If C be tonic : — Mode 3. 



^^^^ 



3tz#: 



■2zr: 



-z^- 



cle En - qui-ring a - bout my sweet one. And 
246 



Locks and Bolts 



^ 






5 



•r-i 



:± 



q==:t=^=^: 



^— •— 6-— 



-25*- 



all they could say : There's no such here. And O . then what weep-ing I 



D 



Pentatonic. Mode 4.* 



Sung by Mrs. Harland Shelton 
at Spillcorn, N. C, Sept. 6, 1916 




love so . well, She's 

(a) 



al - most the com - plete one. 



ii— • ^ ^ 



I 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Combs, at Knott Co., 
August, 1908 
3 



^ 



I* 



3 



V 



^ 



^— 



=F 



2-^ — ^-^— ± 

Young men and maids, pray tell your age, I'll tell . you of a 

s 




sweet one ; She is the 



ii 



dar - ling of my heart, She is . the 



^^ 



-f^- 



-ir- 



-^-^ 



^ 



most 



plete one. Me and 



my 



love lay down one 



ry-T-^-^ 




-\>w^ 


— - — 1 


9 


\ 


r — 


, — 


; 


K i 


/ h " ' 


Z r^ • 


^ 


*+ 1 II 1 ' If ) 


-^Y 


^ 


1 


y 


^i=r ;r 


-£— <» — 


t:^. — 


^ — 


^~ — 


m '•i 




— I— 








— t ' 













night, All on 



bed 



^= 



to 
<. 3 



ge - ther; When I woke 



=^4 



2-g- 



V- 



^ 



S=^ 



up my love was gone, I was forced to 

* If C be tonic : — Mode 3. 

247 



lie with 



out her. 



No. 8i 

William and Nancy 



Pentatonic. Mode i, a ( no 2nd ). 



Sung by Mrs. Mandy Shelton 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. ii, 1916 




:i 



-^- 



Sweet Wil-liam were ta - ken with a pain in his breast, Say-ing: 



i 



:^==1- 



Can I die love - sick and can't get no rest ? He wrote her a 



i=i 



-I H 



-(S^ 



i3E 



H*=P= 



3t=t±-^ 



let - ter, it was to let her know That he was - n't mar-ried but still could not go. 

2 When Nancy came to hear it, it filled her with grief, 
Saying : I'll go to William and give him relief. 
When William saw Nancy standing by his bedside. 

Saying : There is the pretty girl who might have been my bride. 

3 She is lawfully married, I'll die for her sake. 

She linked her arms round him and felt his heart break. 
Sweet William died love-sick, I hope he's at rest ; 
And Nancy she fainted and died on his breast. 

4 Come all you old and married men, come sit down by me, 
And you that are bachelors, take warning by me. 

When you go a-courting, don't you court slow, 
Don't court no other till she tells you No. 

5 I courted handsome Nancy till a fortune I won, 
And to see some other straightway I did run. 
At a chief of my practice, at a doubt of my woe, 
I lost handsome Nancy by courting too slow. 



248 



No. 82 



George Reilly 

A 



Heptatonic. Mode 2, a -f- b 
( dorian ).* 



(b) 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



im^ 



(^ 



S=?_: 



pTii^i 



is 
2 



I. As 



I walked out 



sum - mer s morn - mg 



To 




view and take the plea - sant air, I 



saw a girl, and a 




:1^ 



4 — ^ — ^- 



=!= 



:^: 



-4 ^ 



come - ly 



fair one ; She appeared to me some 11 - ly fair. 



<^) I <f) 



2 Said I : Kind Miss, don't you want to marry, 
O won't you be a merchant's wife ? 

She said : No, kind sir, I'd rather tarry, 
I'd rather lead a single life. 

3 What makes you differ, 

what makes you differ from all other womankind ? 
For you are young and you are useful. 

And now to marry I do incline. 

4 It's No, kind sir, if I may please to tell you, 

1 could have been married full four years ago 
Unto the man they call George Reilly, 

The cause of all my overthrow. 

5 It's when he found that her love was loyal, 
Kisses he give her by two, three, five, four. 
I am the man you call George Reilly, 
The cause of all your overthrow. 

6 Come, let us marry, love, no longer tarry ; 
We'll lay up riches in great store. 

We'll sail the ocean high o'er promotion. 
For upon my vow I'll leave you no more. 

'If G be tonic : — M <de 4, a + b ( mixolydian ). 

249 



George Reilly 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 1916 



,4: 



s 



4: 



I a: 



:4=t: 



l:4=t: 



As 



I walked out one cool 



sum ' mer 



morn - mg 



To 



t^ 



=i 



4: 



A- 



take the cool and 



plea - sant air ; It's 



there I spied a 



±# 



S^ 



E4=^ 



43: 



::j: 



as 



«■ * — •— 



^ 



come - ly 



crea-ture, Who 'peared to me as a 



li- ly 



^ 



fair. 



250 



No. 83 
Johnny Doyle 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a.* 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 




I. Last Fri 



eve - ning it hap - pened but late, When 




me and my John - ny was 



bout to take a flight, My 




=F= 



eee 



^ 



wait - ing maids was a-stand-ing by, these words hear - ed she; She 






l=± 



:t=t 



i 



w 



to 



my 



ther and 



told 



up 



2 She kindled up his clothes and bid him to be gone, 
How slowly and slily he moved along. 

By young Samuel Moor they forced me to ride, 
Took six double horsemen to ride by my side. 

3 As soon as the minister he entered the door, 
My ear-bobs they bursted and fell to the floor ; 
In sixty-five pieces my stay-laces flew ; 

I thought in my soul my poor heart would break in two. 

4 Behind my oldest brother they carried me safely home. 
And through my mother's chamber and into my own room, 
And by my own bedside I throwed myself down, 

How sore, sick and wounded my poor body I found. 

5 She called to her old mother : Pray do shut the door, 
By this time tomorrow let in Samuel Moor. 

He never shall enjoy me nor call me his bride, 
For by this time tomorrow it's I will be dead. 



•If D be tonic: — Mode 3, a. 



251 



Johnny Doyle 

6 Up spoke her old father with the water in his eyes : 
As we found it no better, we'll send for Johnny DiUls. 
It's no use in sending, for the journey it is far. 
And by this time tomorrow it's I'll be dead. 
So farewell, cruel father, and likewise mother too. 
And the last words she said was : Farewell to Johnny Dials. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Bessie Smith 
at Charlottesville, Va., Sept. 25, 1916 





o.Ji 


1 1 


1 1 






JVr^-x 1 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




"^ 


'A m 








w/ 


\ J 


«> • m ■ 




J 1 J 

1 • 




\v^ 


i-25- • - 










»_ 


r 











When I was a maid - en all crossed up in love, The 



3 



-^5l- 



il 



:t: 



kis - ses I de - sired from the pow - ers a - bove ; Since 



^H— t 



1 



h 

kis - sing is a plea - sure and court - ing is no toil, I 



| _, . , f^^ 



^^ 



^ 



Effi 



fe^^E^*: 



free - ly wade the 



cean for young John - ny Doyles. 



252 



No. 84 

Lazarus 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b* 



P^i^ii^ 



Sung by Mr. & Mrs. Gabriel Coates 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. i, 1916 



Hzut 



:^: 



I. There was a man in an - cient times, The Scrip -tures doth in 



=1: 



^ 



^- 



^ 



-75)- 



form us, Whose pomp and gran - deur and whose crimes Was 

= -1- I- 



n- 



-7^- 



i 



-si- 



:q=:j: 



±1 



:f= 



great and ve - ry num - 'rous. This rich 



:i 



man fared sumptuous- 



^=f%=f^ 



EEEEEhEEEEEIE^ 



ly 



each day And was dressed in pur - pie fine lin - en. . 



He 



:± 



^EE3= 



-^— • 



V- 



^— • 



^ 2^ 



eat and drink, but scorned to pray, And spent his day in sin - ning. 



2 This poor man lay at the rich man's gate. 
To help himself unable, 

And there he lay to humbly wait 

For the crumbs from his rich table. 

But not one crumb would this happy cure (epicure) 

Ever aye protend to send him. 

The dogs took pity and licked his sores. 

More ready to befriend him. 

3 This poor man died at the rich man's gate, 
Where angel bands attended ; 
Straightway to Abraham's bosom flown, 
Where all his sorrows ended. 

This rich man died and was buried too, 
But O, his dreadful station ; 
With Abraham and Lazarus both in view 
' He landed in damnation. 



• If G be tonic : — Mode 1, b. 



253 



Lazarus 

He cried : O father Abraham, 
Send Lazarus with cold water, 
For I'm tormented in these flames 
With these tormenting tortures. 
Says Abraham : Son, remember well, 
You once did God inherit, 
But now at last your doom's in hell 
Because you would not cherish. 
Go where you cannot now enjoy. 
Which augments your damnation ; 
Besides there is a gulf between 
Prevents communication. 



254 



No. 85 



Black is the Colour 



Pentatonic. Mode 4, b 
(with sharpened 7th; no 4th). 



Sung by Mrs. Lizzie Roberts 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



» 



-=!v 




I. But 

(a) 



black 



the 



lour of 
3 



my 



true love's 



-*=r,_ 



=F= 



hair, His face is like some ro - sy fair; The pret - tiest 



3^ 



^ •- 



I 



w 



?F — «- 



333 



i 



face and the neat - est hands, I love the ground where-on he stands. 



t- 



- M S d - 



-r^-^ 



£ 



£te 



d d d 



P 



-n — W- 



t 



2 I love my love and well he knows 

I love the ground whereon he goes. 
If you no more on earth I see, 
I can't serve you as you have me. 

3 The winter's passed and the leaves are green, 
The time is passed that we have seen. 

But still I hope the time will come 
When you and I shall be as one. 

4 I go to the Clyde for to mourn and weep, 
But satisfied I never could sleep, 

I'll write to you in a few short lines, 
I'll suffer death ten thousand times. 

5 So fare you well, my own true love. 

The time has passed, but I wish you well ; 
But still I hope the time will come 
When you and I will be as one. 

6 I love my love and well he knows, 

I love the ground whereon he goes ; 
The prettiest face, the neatest hands, 
I love the ground whereon he stands. 

255 



No. 86 



The Single Girl 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Ellie Johnson 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



i 



->^ — fv 



:i=?c 



^=P: 



^ — ^ 



• — ^- 



^=F^. 



=F 



-V— ^- 



I. When I was sin - gle, went dressed all so fine; Now I am mar - ried, go 



Em 



rag - ged all the time. I wish I was a sin - gle girl a 



m 



I 



w 



1^ 



'^-^ 



gain, O Lord, don't I wish I was a sin - gle girl a - gain. 

2 When I was single, my shoes did screak ; 
Now I am married, my shoes they do leak. 

3 Three little babes crying for bread, 

With none to give them, I'd rather be dead. 

4 One a-crying : Mamma, I want a piece of bread ; 
One a-crying : Mamma, I want to go to bed. 

5 Wash them little feet and put them to bed. 

Along comes a drunkard and wishes they were dead. 

6 Wash their little feet and send them to school, 
Along comes a drunkard and calls them a fool. 

7 When he comes in, it's a curse and a row, 
Knocking down the children and pulling out my hair. 

8 Dishes to wash, springs to go to ; 
When you are married, you've all to do. 

9 Suppers to get, the cows to milk, 

Them blamed little children is all crying yet. 



256 



No. 87 



John Hardy 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
|( mixolydian influence ). 
{a) 



Sung by Mrs. Ellie Johnson 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 






S 



E 



w 



I. John Har - dy was 



brave and des - pe - ra - ted man, 



He 




:^: 



:t^ 



i 



car - ried his gun ev - ery day. 



He killed him a man in the 



::i^=^ 



Shun 



ny 




camps, This day 



he's con - demned 



to 



be 



'-A- 



^ 



hung, 



!^ 



do know, This day he's con - demned to 

w 



be 



-<5>-i- 



I 



hung. 



% 



—^- 



2 John Hardy's father was a-standing round, 
Pray John, what have you done ? 

I've killed me a man m the Shunny Camps, 
This day I'm condemned to be hung, I do know, 
This day I'm condemned to be hung. 

3 I've been to the river and I've been baptized, 
I've rambled this wide world through; 

I'm standing on the hanging ground, 
I'm standing on the hanging ground. . 

4 John Hardy's mother was a-standing round. 
Pray Judge, what has he done ? 

He's killed him a man in the Shunny Camps, 
This day he's condemned to be hung, poor boy, 
This day he's condemned to be hung. 

5 John Hardy's brother was a-standing round. 
O John, what have you done ? 

I've killed my partner for fifty cents, 

For the sake of my blue eyed girl, I do know, 

For the sake of my blue eyed girl. 

257 



John Hardy 

6 John Hardy's sister was a-standing round. 
O John, what have you done ? 

I've killed me a man in the Shunny Camps, 
This day I'm condemned to be hung, i do know, 
This day I'm condemned to be hung. 

7 O who will shoe your pretty little feet, 
And who will glove your hands ? 

And who will kiss your rosy red cheeks 
When I'm laid in the cold, cold ground ? 

8 My papa will shoe my pretty little feet. 
My mamma will glove my hands. 

My sweetheart will kiss my rosy red cheeks 
When you're laid in the cold, cold ground. 

9 O where did you get your pretty little shoes ? 

where did you get your dress ? 

1 bought my shoes from a railroad man, 
Got my dress from a man in the mine. 



258 



No. 88 

Betty Anne 



i 



Pentatonic. Mode 4, a. 

(«) Re/rain 



Sung by Mrs. Ellie Johnson 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept 16, 1916 



^ 



^ 



^-g^ 



^l 



Lor, lor, my lit - tie Bet - ty Anne, Lor, lor, I say, 



g 



*5j; 



I-H2Z- 



-^ N- 



:^^=?^ 



: y W 



-m « — t^ 

9m— 



^ * 



-75^ 



Lor, lor, my lit - tie Bet - ty Anne, I'm go - ing a - way to stay. 



:^!^=^ 



\ H 1 F F 4 1 S — -I P P [ 

^r^ ^- J 4 U— lJ *^T^^^ ^ ^ <^ - 



g 



I. Cheeks as red as a red, red rose. Her eyes as a dia - mond brown. I'm 



r~^ f» — w^-^ — f- 



i 



:^: 



W 



=t=^ 



:^i= 



V — ^ 



go -ing to see my pret-ty lit - tie Miss Be -fore the sun goes down 



=1: 



i 



i^ 



^^ 



a 



3tzt 



atzs: 



P3 



2 It's rings on my true love's hands 
Shines so bright like gold. 

Go and see my pretty little Miss 
Before it rains or snows. 

3 When I was up at the field at work, 
I sit down and cry, 

Studying about my blue-eyed boy, 
I thought to my God I'd die. 

4 Fly around, my pretty little Miss, 
Fly around, I say. 

Fly around, my pretty little Miss, 
You'll almost drive me crazy. 

5 Fly around, my pretty little Miss, 
Fly around, my dandy, 

Fly around, my pretty little Miss, 
I don't want no more of your candy. 

259 



No. 89 
My Boy Billy 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 




1=:^= 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 16, 1916 

H N N \ ^ 



4-#^f 



Jt=t: 



I. O where have you been, Bil - ly boy, Bil - ly boy, 



O 



:^=tc 



:^=:|v 



where have you been,charming Bil - ly ? I have been to seek a wife For the 



I 






plea-sures of my life ; She's a young girl and can - not leave her mam - my. 

2 How old is she, Billy boy, Billy boy, 
How old is she, charming Billy ? 
She's a hundred like and nine. 
And I hope she will be mine ; 

She's a young girl and cannot leave her mammy. 

3 How tall is she, etc. 
She's as tall as any pine. 

And as slim as a pumpkin vine ; 
She's a young girl, etc. 

4 Can she make a chicken pie, etc. 
She can make a chicken pie 
Till it makes the preachers cry ; 
She's a young girl, etc. 

5 Can she roll a boat ashore, etc. 
She can roll a boat ashore, 
And make her own door. 
She's a young girl, etc. 

B 

1 Where have you been, Billy boy, Billy, 
Where have you been, charming Billy ? 
I've been to see my wife. 
She's the pleasure of my life ; 
She's a young thing, aha, to leave her mamma. 



260 



My Boy Billy 

2 Did she ask you to come in, etc. 
She asked me to come in ; 

She had a dimple in her chin ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

3 Did she set you a chair, etc. 
She set me a chair ; 

She had wrinkles in her ear ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

4 Did she ask you for to eat, etc. • 
She asked me for to eat. 

She had plenty bread and meat ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

5 Can she card and can she spin, etc. 
She can card and she can spin. 
And she can do most anything ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

6 Can she sew and can she fell, etc. 
She can sew and she can fell. 
She can use her needle well ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

7 Can she make a cherry pie, etc. 
She can make a cherry pie 
Quick as a cat can wink his eye ; 
She's a young thing, etc. 

8 How old is she, etc. 

She's twice six, twice seven, 
Twenty-eight and eleven; 
She's a young thing, etc. 



261 



No. 90 



Soldier, Won't You Marry Me? 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 18, 191 6 



#=1= 



I. Sol - dier, sol - dier, won't you 



ry 



-•- 
me? 



It's 



^^=^\ — ^ — 1 - 




—0 


• 


— •— 









=t^ 


w ^ 


1 — 

— ^ — 


#- 


F 


— 2-4- 


« 




1 

— V — 


— 1 

— U' — 


F 

— b — 


— W- — 
— h — 


F 

— b — 


d 


^w — *— 






•' 












— </ — 


— V- — 


— "J- — 





o 

(a) 



fife and drum. 



How can I mar - ry such 



■=i-- 



— ^ 1 •- 

you When I've got 

{a) 



pret - ty girl as 



hat 



to put on ? 



:*Z3t 



2 Off to the tailor she did go 
As hard as she could run, 

Brought him back the finest was there. 
Now, soldier, put it on. 

3 Soldier, soldier, won't you marry me ? 
It's O a fife and drum. 

How can I marry such a pretty girl as you 
When I've got no coat to put on ? 

4 Off to the tailor she did go 
As hard as she could run. 

Brought him back the finest was there. 
Now, soldier, put it on. 

5 Soldier, soldier, won't you marry me ? 
It's O a fife and drum. 

How can I marry such a pretty girl as you 
When I've got no shoes to put on ? 

6 Off to the shoe shop she did go 
As hard as she could run, 

Brought him back the finest was there. 
Now, soldier, put them on. 

7 Soldier, soldier, won't you marry me ? 
It's O a fife and drum. 

How can I marry such a pretty girl as you 
And a wife and a baby at home ? 
262 



No. 91 



Swannanoa Town 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner and Mrs. Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 

4 — ^^= ^ -^ ^ 



-± 



^ 



I. Swan - na - no - a Town, O, Swan - na - no - a 



-4z 



i^i 



=^E 



-X 



^-- 



Town, O, . That's my home, ba - by, that's my home. 

(a) nu(«) 




S> ^ ^ ^s^ «< ^ 



(^) 



&- — 4- 



•(& iS* jl- 



^ 



;i 



2 I'm going back to the Swannanoa Town, O, 
Before long, baby, before long. 

3 When you hear the hoodows hollerhig. 
Sign of rain, baby, sign of rain. 

4 When you hear my bull-dog barking. 
Somebody round, baby, somebody round. 

5 When you hear my pistol firing, 

Another man dead, baby, another man dead. 

6 I'll be back all in September, 
'Twon't be long, baby, 'twon't be long. 

7 Look for me till your eye runs water, 
I'll be at home, baby, I'll be at home. 

8 O Lord, Ella, what's your trouble ? 
I have none, baby, I have none. 

9 Don't you remember last December, 

The wind blowed cold, baby, the wind blowed cold. 

10 I'm a-going back to Swannanoa Town, O, 
That's my home, baby, that's my home. 



263 



No. 92 
The Keys of Heaven 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



iM 



r=a=i 



H* f*- 



^ b ^- 



I. I'll give to you a pa - per of pins, And that's the way our 




=1= 



^-=^1. 



5=i 



^ — ^- 



#-t- * #- 



-i* — •- 



■Z5l- 



love be - gins, If you will mar- ry me, my Miss, If you will mar-ry me. 



2 I won't accept your paper of pins, 
If that's the way our love begins, 
And I'll not marry you, sir, you. 
And I'll not marry you. 

3 I'll give to you a dress of red, 
Stitched all around with a golden thread, 
If you will marry me, etc. 

4 I won't accept your dress of red. 
Stitched all around with a golden thread, 
And I'll not marry you, etc. 

5 I'll give to you a dress of green, 

And you may dress as fine as a queen. 
If you will marry me, etc. 

6 I won't accept your dress of green. 
For I don't dress as fine as a queen, 
And I won't marry you, etc. 

7 I'll give to you a little lap-dog, 

That you may nurse as you go abroad. 
If you will marry me, etc. 

8 I won't accept your little lap-dog. 
For I don't nurse when I go abroad, 
And I won't marry you, etc. 

9 I'll give to you a house and land, 

That you may have at your own command, 
If you will marry me, etc. 

264 



The Keys of Heaven 

10 I won't accept your house and land, 
That I may have at my own command, 
And I won't marry you, etc. 

11 I'll give to you the keys of my heart 
That we may marry and never part, 
If you will marry me, etc. 

12 I won't accept the keys of your heart 
That we may marry and never part, 
And I won't marry you, etc. 

13 I'll give to you the keys of my desk 

That you may have money at your request. 
If you will marry me, etc. 

14 I will accept the keys of your desk 
That I may have money at my request. 
And I will marry you, sir, you. 

And I will marry you. 

15 You love coffee and I love tea. 

You love my money, but you don't love me, 
And I'll not marry you. Miss, you, 
And I'll not marry you. 



B 



Heptatonic. Major Mode. 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 16, 1916 



Si 



p^ 



1^=1=:^: 



--fv- 



I. I'll give to you a pa - per of pins, And that's the way our 



i 



10 



W- 



T-f 



t±i 



--N- 



rir^ 



love be -gins. If you will mar - ry me, O me, If you will mar - ry me. 



2 I don't accept your paper of pins. 
If this is the way our love begins, 
And I won't marry you, O you. 
And I won't marry you. 

3 I'll give to you a little red shawl, 

And you may dance with the ladies all. 
If you will marry me, etc. 

265 



The Keys of Heaven 

4 I don't accept your little red shawl, 
Nor I'll not dance with the ladies all, 
And I won't marry you, etc. 

5 I'll give to you the keys of my desk. 

And you shall have money when you request. 
If you will marry me, etc. 

6 I will accept the keys of your desk. 
And I'll take money at my request. 
And I will marry you, etc. 

7 If you love money and don't love me 
Oury love will never agree, 

Nor I won't marry you, O you, 
Nor I won't marry you. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 1916 



i 



pa: 



I. I 



will 



give 



you 



pa 



per 



of 



pms. 



And 



i 



^ m ' ' ^ ^ 

that is the way that love be - gins. If you will mar - ry, 



I 



^ 



-25^ 



-:ir 



mar - ry, mar - ry 



me, 



If 



you 



will 



ry 



2 I will not accept any paper of pins, 
If that is the way that love begins, 
And I won't marry, marry, marry you, 
And I won't marry you. 

3 I will give to you the key to my desk. 
That you can get money at free access, 
If you will marry, marry, marry me, 

If you will marry me. 

4 I will accept of the key of your desk, 
If I can get money at free access. 
And I will marry, marry, marry you, 
And I will marry you. 

266 



The Keys of Heaven 

5 Ha, ha, ha, if money is all, 
I won't marry you at all, 
And I won't marry, marry, marry you, 
And I won't marry you. 



267 



No. 93 

Putman's Hill 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hughes 



Hexatonic 


. Mode 4, a. 








at "'Voodridge, Va 


., Sept. 27, 1916 


/'TW»> 


1 


1 1 L 


1 1 1 




1 


/, \ »^ 1 


III 


i ! r\<j 


m 1 \ \ 




1 


l(\ '<^ 


^ 


m 


m n^_ 


• • J 




J 1 


Lg)_2_JJ 


^ 1^ • 


^^ 


1 


• —J 


t=? = ^_U 



I. When I went o - ver Put-man's Hill, There I sat and cried my fill. 



vM. 



i 



t- 



:i 



5 



=± 



=F 



-• • 



Ev - 'ry tear would turn a mill, O Sue, come sick - a - rock Sue. 



^ 



# N+^ ^ N N 

• d ^ ^ iJ +- 



Sue, Sue, Sue with a rue. Sue, come sick- a - rock, a pick a pock a poo. 



g 



jtzfcivzi^ 



i — ^ — ^ — >d — I- 



P^=^^y 



■ d d d—^ 



^—d—^—d 



A h- 



■z^ 



First Ka -tie won-der, f ad- dy, f ad- dy, ee - do, Mee-dy, ee-dy, i - do Sue. 



2 My old master, he's mighty cross, 
He would not lend me mule nor horse, 
He's none the better, nor I'm none the worse, 
O Sue, etc. 



268 



No. 94 

The False Young Man 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a.* 



Sung by Mr. T. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 3, 1916 



^#=P= 



^Ef 



^^ 



(a) 



* -I — K 1 ' J 1| 1 1 



5^E 



I. Come in, come in, my old true love. And chat a - while with me, For it's 



^ P P J 

1 1 1 K. 



:t 



-^ — k- 



^^-lv 



=^=i=i: 



^-^"■ 



4: 






been three quarters of one long year or more Since I spoke one 



-V- 
word to 



thee. 




2 I can't come in, nor I shan't sit down, 
For I ain't a moment of time ; 

Since you are engaged with another true love, 
Your heart is no more mine. 

3 When your heart was mine, true love, 
And your head lay on my breast. 

You could make me believe by the falling of your arm 
That the sun rose up in the west. 

4 There's many a girl can go all round about 
And hear the small birds sing. 

And many a girl that stays at home alone 
And rocks the cradle and spin. 

5 There's many a star that shall jingle in the west, 
There's many a leaf below, 

There's a many a damn will light upon a man 
For serving a poor girl so. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Gabriel Coates 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept 2, 1916 



* 



*=t 



m 



i=i^ 



^t 



t=^ 



P 



I. As I walked out one morn- ing in Spring For to hear the lit - tie birds sing 

• If D be tonic : — Mode 2, a. 

269 



The False Young Man 



i 



m 






w 



1= 



:1^=:^ 



sweet, I leaned my-self a - gainst an old oak tree For to see two lov - ers meet. 

2 For to see two lovers meet, my dear, 
And hear what they did say, 

That I might learn a little more of their mind 
Before I was forced away. 

3 Before I was forced away. 
Before I was forced away, 

That I might learn a little more of their mind 
Before I was forced away. 

4 Come in, come in, my old true love, 
And sit you down by me, 

For it has been three-quarters of a year 
Since together we have been. 

5 Since together we have been, my dear, 
Since together we have been. 

For it has been three-quarters of a year 
Since together we have been. 

6 I can't come in, my old true love, 
For I ain't got a moment to stay. 

For I heard you give your heart to another young man. 
And I've no more time to stay. 

7 I've climbed as high a tree as there is. 
And I've robbed as rich a nest, 

And I've come down without e'er a fall, 
And I'll marry who I do love best. 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Anelize Chandler 

at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 28, 1916 



5 



'^ 



S: 



kSz 



^ 



s 



I. I walked out one May morning To hear the small birds sing,And I 



=i=*=fE 



I 



:e^ 



^i-j-^ 



leaned my back 'gainst a cot - tage door For to hear what they had to say. 



m 



■m£ 



I 



270 



The False Young Man 

2 It's come you in, my dear, 
And talk awhile with me. 

I won't come in, nor I shan't sit down, 
For I have not a moment to stay. 
I suppose you have some other true love 
And your heart is no more mine. 

3 I'm a-going tomorrow, my dear, 
It is for a little while, 

Buf I'm a-coming back again, my love, 
If I go ten thousand mile. 

4 If I go away and prove false to you, my dear. 
And never no more return. 

The rocks will run and the sea will burn 
And the earth will melt with fervent heat. 

5 Who will shoe my feet, my love, 
Or who will glove my hands, 
Or who will kiss my ruby lips 
When you're in the foreign land ? 

6 Tell your father to shoe your feet, my love. 
And tell your mother to glove your hands, 
And I will kiss your ruby lips 

When I come from the foreign land. 

7 He laid his right arm on my shoulder, 
He laid his left one on my breast. 
Which might have made me a-believe 
That the sun rose in the west. 

8' There's many a star in the heavens above. 
And a green bunch of grass below. 
What a heavy, heavy cross will hang on a man 
That will treat a poor girl so. 

9 I wish to God I'd a-never been born, 
Or a-died when I was young ; 
I never would have wet my cheeks with tears 
For the loss of no other woman's son. 

D 

Sung by Mrs. Sophie A. Hensley 
Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. at Clay Co , Ky., 1908 



^ ^^^_ g=f=B ^^'#3 ^ 



\M± 



I. I walked out one bright May morning To hear the birds sing sweet, I 

271 



The False Young Man 



seat - ed my - self in a green sha - dy grove To see two lov - ers meet. 



I 



S 



2 To see two lovers meet, my dear, 
And to hear what they might say, 

For I wanted to know a piece of their mind 
Before I went away. 

3 Come sit you down, my own true love, 
Come sit you down by me, 

For it has been three-fourths of a long, long year 
Since together we have been. 

4 I can't sit down and I won't sit down, 
For I have not a moment of time. 

And perhaps you have another true love 
And your heart's no longer mine. 

5 You know what you told me, love, 
You know what you said. 

You know what you promised me 
When another true love was dead. 

6 You made me believe by the faults you swore 
With your arms all around my waist, 

You made me believe by the faults you swore. 
That the sun did rise in the west. 

7 That the sun did arise in the west, my dear. 
And turns square back to the east ; 

But once again I've come to myself 
And I find you are a thief. 

8 I never will believe what another boy says, 
Let his eyes be dark or brown, 

Unless he's upon a high gallows top. 
Saying : Love, I'd rather come down. 

9 I'd rather not be hung ; 

For the words of a young boy 
Are too hard to believe. 
For they li-ee to every one. 



272 



The False Young Man 



Heptatonic. Mode i, a + b. 
( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 

at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 27, 191 6 



ip: 



^^-- 



r- 



r- 



=F 



— I — « — 

I. Come in, come in, my old true love, And take a chair by me; I 



S3S 



IB 



EM 



=t 



• — ^ — f— ^ 



long to have some more of your chat Be - fore you do go a - way. 



273 



No. 95 






Pretty Peggy O 

A 

Hexatonic. Mode i, a. * Sung by Mrs. Combs, Knott Co., Ky., 1908 



a: 



m 



ii 



W 



I. As 



we marched down 



to 



Fer 



o, 



As 



g 



=P=» 



=F= 



^ 



-^E=h 



we marched down to Fer- na - ri - o, Our Cap -tain fell in love with a 




:± 



■• — — h-#- 



I 



^—s^ 



la - dy, like a dove, And they called her Pret - ty Peg - gy, O. 

2 What would your mother think, Pretty Peggy O, 
What would your mother think, Pretty Peggy O ? 

What would your mother think for to hear the guineas clink 
And the soldiers marching before ye O ? 

3 You shall ride in your coach. Pretty Peggy O, 
You shall ride in your coach, Pretty Peggy O, 

You shall ride in your coach and your true love by your side 
Just as grand as any lady in the Ario. 

4 Come stepping down the stairs. Pretty Peggy O, 
Come stepping down the stairs, Pretty Peggy O, 

Come stepping down the stairs, combing back your yellow hair, 
Take the last farewell of Sweet William O. 

5 If ever I return. Pretty Peggy O, 
If ever I return. Pretty Peggy O, 

If ever I return, the city I will burn down, 
And destroy all the ladies in the Ario. 

6 Our captain he is dead. Pretty Peggy O, 
Our captain he is dead, Pretty Peggy O, 

Our captain he is dead, and he died for a maid 
And he's buried in the Louisiana country O. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 




-^ 



4=?: 



I. As we marched down thro' I - vo - ry, As we marched down thro' 

274 



Pretty Peggy O 





la - dy, like a dove, But he called her by her name, Pret - ty 

-^ — n- K N -\- 



:^ 



^Eii 



:l 



-A- 



Peg - gy O, But he called her by her name, Pret - ty Peg - gy O. 

2 It's will you marry me. Pretty Peggy O ? 
It's will you marry me, Pretty Peggy O ? 

You may dress in your silks and ride the buggy high 
Just as grand as any in the country O. 

3 It's William is the man I do adore, 

But I'm afeard my mother would be angry O. 

What would your mother think to hear the chingles dank 

And the soldiers marching on the floor O ? 

4 Come trip you downstairs, Pretty Peggy O, 
Come trip you downstairs, Pretty Peggy O, 

Come trip you downstairs and roach back your yellow hair, 
Take the last farewell of your little William O. 



275 



No. 96 



My Parents Treated Me Tenderly 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mr. Frankland B. Shelton 
at Allanstand, N. C, July 31, 1916 



tS 



siEiE.^2 



±F 



I. When I be - came a ro - ver It grieved my heart most sore To 



i=d=± 



3 



leave my a - ged par - ents, To ne - ver see them more. 

2 My parents did treat me tenderly, 
They had no child but me, 

But my mind was bent on roving, 
With them I couldn't agree. 

3 There was a noble gentleman 
In yonder town drew nigh ; 
He had one only daughter. 
On her I cast my eye. 

4 She was young and tall and handsome, 
Most beautiful and fair ; 

There wasn't a girl in that whole town 
With her I could compare. 

5 I told her my intention ; 
It was to cross the main. 

It's, love, will you prove faithful 
Till I return again? 

6 She said she would prove faithful 
Till death did prove unkind. 

We kissed, shook hands and parted, 
I left my girl behind. 

7 It's when I left old Ireland, 
To Scotland I was bound. 
I'll march from Zion to me 
To view the country round. 

8 The girls were fair and plenty there 
And all to me proved kind, 

But the dearest object of my heart 
Was the girl I left behind. 

276 



My Parents Treated Me Tenderly 

9 I walked out one evening 

All down the George's Square ; 
The mail coach ship had just arose, 
When the post-boy met me there. 

lo He handed me a letter 

That gave me to understand 
That the girl I left behind me 
Had wedded to another man. 

Ill advanced a little further, 
I found the news quite true ; 
I turned myself all round aboul , 
I knew not what to do. 

12 I'll serve my trade, I'll quit my woe, 
Bad company I'll resign ; 
I'll rove around from town to town 
For the girl I left behind. 



B 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 10, 1916 



feis33 



g^=^^ 



[B£ 



g^e: 



i/ V \/—^ 



S 



^58: 



3t=t 



My par- ents they treated me ten - der - ly, They had no child but 



=M= 



t^ 



^==^ 



-i^ 



^ 



II 



^ 



5 



:^ 



:ij=i: 



me. . My mind was bent on ro - ving,With them I couldn't a - gree. 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Becky Griffin 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 1916 



m 



H ^ •- 



B=^=i&: 



:^ 



r- 



$ 



She was young and fair and hand - some, Both beau - ti - ful and 



i 



^ 



--:^- 



^ 



:* 



fair. . So late in the morn-ing I went to George-'s Square. 

(a) 



I 



277 



No. 97 

The Sheffield Apprentice 
A 

Heptatonic. Mode 2, a + b Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 

(dorian). at AUanstand, N. C, Aug. 3, 1916 



F^3-4 



:t 



:± 



ii= 



5 



=i= 



-iS- 



I. As I grew up in Bos - ton in such a low de - gree, My 



d= 



{b) 



=1= 



^=-t 



^?=tP= 



-iS'-r- 





par - ents they 


a - dore 

1 


me, 


no 


- ther child but me. 


Un - be - 




/t' 1 1 




r^ ■" 


f ^ \ 1 




1 


/ 


1 1 1 1 




Y 


A 


~ 






r 








• ■ 


1 '^ 


L^ ^ , -L 


U 1 \ — 




1 — 1 1 



knownst to friends or par - ents, from them I stole my way, And 




:d=i 



B 



li 



steered my course to Lon - don, and bit - ter be the day. 



^- 






=F 



V- 






Ih 



:b 



2 And when I got to London a fair lady met me there 
And offered me in wages to live with her one year ; 
And offered me in wages fine house and fine land, 

If I'd give consent and marry her, she'd be at my command. 

3 I said : Dear Miss, excuse me, I cannot wed you both, 
I'm promised to pretty Polly and bounded with an oath. 
Then Miss she grew angry and from me fled away, 
A-swearing by all her vengeance she'd be my overthrow. 

4 I stepped out one evening to take the pleasant air, 
1 find Miss in the garden, a-viewing the lilies fair. 
The gold rings on her fingers, as she come past by me, 
She dropped them in my pocket, and for it I must die. 

5 They put me on a east bound train one cold December day, 
And every station I rode through I heard the people say : 
Yonder goes a young man, in iron chains he's bound. 

For some crime or other he's bound for Charlestown. 



278 



The Sheffield Apprentice 

6 Here is my dear old father, he's pleading at the bar, 
Likewise my aged mother pulling out grey locks of hair, 
A-pulling out those old grey locks, the tears come trinkling down. 
Son, O son, what have you done ? You're bound for Charlestown. 

7 Then I was executed and on the gallows hung. 

My friends and my relations all round me they did mourn, 
And my father and my mother all round me they did cry. 
Farewell, my dear old parents, now I am bound to die. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 






Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



:1: 



tq 



I. I . was brought up in Snow -field In such a low de - gree ; My 



-0 — 0- 



par - ents doat - ed on me Hav - ing no child but me. I 



f • 



=F 



^^EE 



=[==F 



ripped and roved and ram - bled, Till my fan - cies me mis - led. And 



::\=f--i 



-<s>-^ 



I 



then I be - came a hired - ed And all my joys were dead. 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



L4: 



:3E^5 



Sung by Mrs. Gabriel Coates 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 2, 1916 



-^ •- 



fc4: 



T> • 



279 



The Sheffield Apprentice 



F^: 



:e: 



{a) 



•3t=j: 



{a) 



I 



i=± 



D 



Hexatonic. Mode i, a + t> 
( mixolydian influence, no 2nd). 



Sung by Mrs. Tempa Shelton 
at Spillcorn, N. C, Sept. 6, 1916 



It 



^=# 



H- 



=F^F 



^^s=^ 



^^ 



=s=^ 



^ci5r 



"•=p= 



i 



E33^ 



^^F 



^ 



• U ' * 



l=?±i?^?: 



=i=P^ 



SE 



-^— i»- 



^Q= 



=i-=P= 



:t=t=t7t— t 



"^ 



280 



No. 98 
The Broken Token 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Mary Sands 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. i, 1916 




^^fc^=1: 



±=lM. 



!=-^==:1: 



3=i 



::1: 



f«=i= 



I. A fair lit - tie Miss all 



;=b=^=i 




::^=rf=4^ 



L*— t 



in the gr.r - den, And a brave young 

-16? = • • :^ -z. — 



^ 



-'^ 



V-- 



sol - dier came a - pas - sing by ; And up he step - ped and thus he ad - 



:^ 



:i 



I] 



dressed her, Says : My pret - ty lit - tie Miss, won't you mar 



ry 



2 She says : No, kind sir, a man of honour, 
A man of honour you may be. 

But how can you impose on a fair lady 
Who never intends your bride to be ? 

3 I've got a true love been gone to the ocean, 
He's been there for seven years long, 

And if he stays seven years longer. 
No man on earth will marry me. 

4 Perhaps he's in the sea-side drownded, 
Or perhaps he's in some battle slain, 

Or perhaps he's took some other girl and married. 
His face you'll never see again. 

5 If he's drownded I'm in hopes he's happy. 
Or if he's in some battle slain, 

Or perhaps he's took some other girl and married, 
I'll love that girl that would have married him. 

6 He run his hands all in his pocket, 
His fingers being long and slim, 

Says: Here's a ring that you did give me 
Before I started to the sea. 

7 She wrung her lily-white hands and cried. 
And straight before him she did fall. 

Says : You are the man that used to court me 
Before you. started to the sea. 



281 



The Broken Token 



B 



Heptatonic. Mode 3, a + b. 
(with flattened 7th). 



i 



±i 



m^ 



^^ 



(^l 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 



:12^ 



3^5 



ifet 



I. A pret - ty 



fair maid all 



her gar - den, 



A gay young 



=i=^: 



:d: 



^= 



0^0 



'.^JZ 



=S= 



sol - dier came a - ri - ding by; He stepped up to this hon - oured 




-7^ 



^l 



■± 



'tSt-r- 



i 



dy. Say - ing: O kind Miss,* can't you fan 



cy 



2 You're not a man of noble honour, 
You're not the man that I took you to be, 
You're not a man of noble honour, 

Or you would not impo.se on a poor girl like me. 

3 I have a true love in the army ; 

He has been gone just seven years long; 
And seven years more I'll wait upon him; 
No man on earth shall enjoy me. 

4 Perhaps he's in some watercourse drownded, 
Perhaps he's in some battle-field slain. 
Perhaps he's stole some fair girl and married ; 
If that's the case, you'll never see him again, 

5 Perhaps he's in some watercourse drownded, 
Perhaps he's in some battle-field slain. 
Perhaps he's stole some fair girl and married; 
I'll love the girl that married him. 

6 He pulled his hands all out of his pockets 
And rings and diamonds two or three ; 

He pulled out a ring that she had given him. 
She saw and fell down at his feet. 

7 He picked her up and did embrace her, 
And kisses gave her two or three, 
Saying : This is your poor single soldier 
Just returned to marry thee. 

282 



The Broken Token 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mr. Mitchell Wallin 
at Allanstand, N. C, Aug. 4, 191 6 




=d: 



-zs*- 



I. There was a la - dy all in the gar - den, A sin - gle 



ii2=^=^= 






:i 



iEE^ 



sol - dier came ri - ding up : And would you mar - ry a sin - gle 



!:d2i 



I 



:f= 



£ 



:t= 



— iS'-r- 



sol - dier, Who just re - turned from the ra - ging sea? 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 (Tonic Bb). 



Sung by Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 11, 1916 



^^^^^ 



ffl^ 



^. 



I 



b f9^~9-^ 



?3= 



W=^ 



jtz=± 



:t=^^ 



SH 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, a 
(with flattened 7th). 



:fe 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Buckner 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



4: 



=1== 



V- 



Good morn - ing, good morn - ing, my fair young la - dy; 



« 



m- 



-p- — n 



m 



i^=t= 



Do you think that you can fan - cy me ? No, I fan - cy a 



ft 



:t=S=p=t. 



fair and hand-some farm - er, Who has just late - ly gone to sea. 



283 



No. 99 

wad BiE Jones 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, b. 



Sung by Miss Viney Norton 
at Big Laurel, N, C, Aug. 16, 191 6 




I. It's one day when I was a-ramb-ling a - round, I met up with 






m 



# 



:*: 



wild Bill Jones. 



It's walk - ing and talk - ing with my Lu - lu 



fi 



¥ 



girl, She bid me for to leave her a - lone. 



I says that my 



F^: 



i 



:i 



■^5^ 



S 



s 



^ 



age 



is twen - ty - three. Too old for to be con - trolled. 



i: 



^ 



'S 



t 



^ 



m 



-<&- 



drew my re - vol - ver from my side And des-troyed that poor boy's soul. 

2 He reeled and he staggered, he fell to the ground, 
He gave one dying groan ; 

He cast his eyes on his Lulu girl's face, 

Says : Darling, you're left alone. 

If I'd have listened to what mamma said, 

At home I'd have been to-day, 

'Stead of being in this old jail 

Wearing my life away. 

3 Pass your jugs and your bottles all around, 
Let's get on the spree. 

For to-day's the last of wild Bill Jones, 
To-morrow'll be the last of me. 
When I am dead and in my coffin, 
Pretty girls all crowded around, 
Push back my coffin lid. 
See the last of wild Bill Jones. 



284 



No. loo 

The Shoemaker 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, 



Sung by Mrs. Carrie Ford 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 



=F 



=f= 



4= 



2.Z 



a 



I. I am a shoe-mak-er by my trade, I'll work in 



m 



^=t 



-7^ 





wea - ther. 


Be - sides 


, two pair I've made to - 


day 


Of a 

I 


side and a 




--J. 


^\ , — 1 


\ 1 -1 \ — 


— ■ 


-t^— 


— 1 1 1 — 


— 


— £(- 


^ TT .J 


—\ ^-1 


1 J ^ J — 


1 


J • 


^ d ^ 




«- 


Y- — ^^ 4 — 


i ^ ' 


— #-= * ^ 1 


^~W ' 






— ^ 



half 



of leath - er. Whack de loo de dum, Whack de loo de doo - dy, 



iS 



I 



^_ 



=t 



:2: 



---X 



'7^ 



Whack de loo de dum, 



Kate, you are my 



2 Go hand me down my pegging awl, 
I stuck it right up yonder. 

Go hand me down my sewing awl 
To peg and sew my leather. 

3 I have lost my shoemaker's wax 
And where do you think I'll find it ? 
O ain't that enough to break my heart. 
O right here, Kate, I've found it. 



dar - ling. 



285 



No. 



lOI 



The Brisk Young Lover 



Heptatonic : Mode i, a -{- h 
( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Miss Della Moore 
at Rabun Co., Ga., May 2, 1909 



m 



it_ 



I. There was a young man who court - ed me, He stole my 



t=^ 



-:^- 



-7:ir 



-S'-r- 



-P=t: 



heart a - way from me, He stole it a - way with a free good • 




'^ 



3 



t 



will; Wher - ev - er 



he 



goes 



I 



love him 



still. 



2 There is a house in this same town. 
He often goes there and sits down ; 
He'll take a strange girl upon his knee, 

And he'll tell her things that he won't tell me. 

3 It troubles me so, and I'll tell you for why, 
Because she has more gold than I, 

But it's gold will melt and silver will fly, 
But mine is love that will never die. 

4 I went upstairs to make my bed, 
To lay me down to rest my head. 
My old mother came to my bedside, 
Saying : What's the matter with my child ? 

5 O mother, O mother, you do not ki.ow 
Of the grief and pain and sorrow. 

Go bring me a chair and I'll sit down, 
With pen and ink I'll write it down. 

6 At the end of each line I dropped a tear, 
At the end of every word cried : O my dear. 
My old father he came home, saying : 
Where has my daughter gone ? 

7 He went upstairs and the door he broke, 
And there he found her hanging to a rope. 
He took his knife and cut her down. 
And on her breast a note he found. 



286 



The Brisk Young Lover 

8 Saying : Foolish, foolish girl am I 
To hang myself for an untrue man. 
Come all ye friends, I bid you good-bye, 
For I hope you must live, but I must die. 



B 



Heptatonic : Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs. N. C, Aug. 25, 1916 



F^ls 



i; 



-«i— 



Must I go bound, must I go free, Must I love a young 






:^: 



::J==]: 



-c*- 



:i3: 



S 



mm. 



man that won't love me ? O no, O 



no, 



that ne - ver can 



I 



-X 



-Ki-!- 



be Till ap - pies grow 



b^ 



on an o - |.range tree. 



^^=^=3^] 



287 



No. I02 

Seven Long Years 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Moore 
at Rabun Co., Ga., 1909 







I. Se-ven long years I've been bound to my trade, In one more I'll be free. 



t-=i' 



:^=:^ 






;0 



I be - long to that jo - vial crew, And no one cares for me. 



i=i=a 




tJtiP; 



T=l=^ 



^ 



s 



=t 



•— •- 



I'll romp and I'll rove,and I'll call for my bode,They may all say what they will ; Re 

1^ 



:^ 



^^^S 



T- 



i_ 0_^__p |:!l_I L.^.,__ __^ .^ ^ L ^__ 

solved that I am, just as long as I can, For to drink good li - quor still. 



I 



2 I have a good old father at home. 
And I've cost him many a pound, 
And now to make amends for this, 
I'll travel the whole world round. 

3 I have a good old mother at home, 
I've caused her a many a tear, 
And now to make amends for this, 
I'll travel far and near. 

4 I have a good little sister at home. 

And she gave me a good piece of advice, 
Said for me to stay with my kind old parents 
And to marry me a pretty little wife. 

5 I have a good little sweetheart at home. 
She gave me a broad piece of gold ; 
It'll neither buy me a house nor a home, 
Nor save my soul from hell ; 

It'll only buy me a full flowing bowl. 
That the ladies may drink their fill. 



2&8 



No. 103 



EMM 



Come All You Young and Handsome Girls 

de 2, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Concle, 
Hexatonic. Mode 2, a. Perry Co., Ky., August, 1908 



Se^^ 



ii=^ 
-g-^ 



I. Come all ye young and hand-some girls, Take warn - ing of a 



friend, And learn the ways of this wide world, And on my word de pend. 

2 I know that the minds of girls are weak 
And the minds of boys are strong, 
And if you listen to their advice. 
They will sure advise you wrong. 

3 They will tell you that they love you dear. 
And wish you safe from harm ; 

Before they will betray their thought, 
They would give up their right arm. 

4 When I was in my sixteenth year, 
And Willie courted me, 

He said if I would go with him 
His loving wife I would be. 

5 My heart it was confined to him, 
I could not well say No ; 

I thought I knew him to be my friend. 
And away with him I did go. 

6 When I was far away from home, 
It was my happiest life. 

He said to me : You may go back home, 
You cannot be my wife. 

7 My father he was kind to me. 
My mother she loved me dear. 

You know you have persuaded me away ; 
How can you leave me here ? 

8 Nellie, Nellie, my darling girl, 
No fault I find with you ; 

I am bound to ramble all around ; 
Now I bid you adieu. 

289 



No. 104 

Loving Reilly 
A 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. MooRE, 
at Rabun Co., Ga., May i, 1909 



t=f 



:S=1: 



# 



:^=^= 



3^^ 



i= 



-25*— 



I. One night ast I lay sleep- ing, so sound as I did sleep, I 



■■9-i- 



heard the voice of my true love a - call - ing at my feet, Say -ing: 



E^ 



5 



Rise up, Wil - liam Ri - ley, come go a - long with me In 



;a 



' z^-. ^ 

to some for - eign coun - try land, and mar - ried we will be. 

2 I'll leave my father's dwelling, forsake my mother's fee. 
Go through the howUng wilderness and married we will be. 
Her old father followed after them with seven armed men. 
Overtaken was poor Riley with his lovely Polly Anne. 

3 And then next morning early the jailor's son come down, 
Saying : Rise up, William Riley, your trial is at hand. 
Before yon bunch of jurors your trial you must stand. 
I'm afraid you'll suffer sorely by your lovely Polly Anne. 

4 Then up spoke an aged lawyer, these words he did say : 
To hang a man for love, boys, I call it murder-y, 

To hang a man for love, boys, 'tis murder you plainly see. 
O spare the life of Riley, and let him leave his country. 

5 Then up spoke her old father, these words he did say : 

He's taken from me gold watches, he's taken from me gold rings, 
He's took a silver brooch pin, 'twas worth a thousand pounds. 
I'll have the life of Riley, or spend ten thousand pounds. 

6 There is a ring amonst the rest I'll have you for to wear. 
The ring has forty diamonds and plaited with my hair. 

O when you wear it, Riley, wear it on your right hand. 

And think of my poor broken heart when you're in foreign land. 



290 



Loving Reilly 

7 O'er Riley's routes and travels, it can't near all be told. 
O Riley he's a handsome man, most neatly to behold ; 
His hair lies over his shoulders like many links of gold ; 
He wanted MacAllen's daughter, she was charming to behold. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House, 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



:B2--J=:z:i=4 




O come, my lev - ing 

r— ^ J^ 



ley, come go a - long with me, I 



£ 



-Jtzz^ 



4ft 



=F== 



long to be a - travel - ling for to leave this coun 



try. For - 



id: 



V- 



--^ 



It 



:t=d 



sake my fa - ther's dwel - ling, fine hous - as and rich land, O - ver 

{a) 



V-±:^--t 



:^: 



=t 



:T 



:«*= 



-^-- 



A^ 



love - ly hills and moun - tains all on the lone - some day. 



{a) 



:S 



^ 



r^= 



291 



No. 105 

The Awful Wedding 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. MoORE, 
at Rabun Co., Ga., May 2, 1909 




fc:J: 



^r-^ 



r- 



:3:a=?_ 



t= 



1 =F U ^d:2 



I. I'll tell you of 



'.-. -^ ^ 1—1- 



:=1: 



aw - ful wed-ding, Where two true 



-g • — p — •— t 



-s*- 



4;z=d:M 



azrJt±2: 



lov-ers proved un- kind. She be 



gin to re - fleet . . on her for - mer 



3: 



EM 



^zzt 



stu - dies, And her old true love run strong in her mind. 

2 They were all seated round the table, 
And every one should sing a song ; 

And the very first one was her old true lover, 
And this is the song that he sung to the bride. 

3 If any one should ask the reason 
Why I put on my strange attire, 

I'm crossed in love, that is the reason, 
I've lost my only heart's delight. 

4 But I'll put on my strange attire, 
And I will wear it for a week or two, 



Till I change my old love for the new. 

5 But how can you lie with your head on another man's pillow, 
When you proved your love so late to me ? 

To bear it any longer she was not able, 
And down at her bridegroom's feet she fell. 

6 There one thing I do desire, 
Perhaps you all will grant me ; 

That is this night to lie by my mother, 
And all that love me lie with thee. 

7 And this request being soon was granted, 
With watery eyes they went to bed. 

So early, so early, as they rose in the morning. 
They found the young bride lying dead. 



292 



No. io6 

Sweet William 



A 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung by Mr. WiLLlAM F. Wells, 
at Swannanoa, N. C, Sept. 9, 1916 



M 



4=4= 



:4=4^M= 



m 



:t: 



I. A sol - dier's trade is a cru - el life; It robs those la - dies of their 



=*=^i 



=^^= 



:4= 



-t 



It: 



i 



heart's de - light, 
(a) 



Caus - es them for to weep and mourn The 



i' 



;ei 



i=r=t 



W- 



m 



loss 

(a) 



of 



sol 



dier 



-•- 
boy 



to 



re - turn. 



W^^^^^=i 



(a) 



=*=i 



'-4^^ 



To show the world that I died of love. 



2 Yellow was the colour of my true love's hair, 
Cheeks was like a lily fair. 

If he returns it'll give me joy; 

Never love any but a sweet soldier boy. 

3 Father, father, build me a boat, 
Over the ocean I may float. 
Every ship that I pass by. 

There I enquired for my sweet soldier boy. 

4 Lady, lady, he's not here ; 
Killed him in the battle, my dear. 

At the head of Rocky Island as we passed by. 
There we left your sweet soldier boy. 

5 She run her boat all o'er a rock. 

I saw that lady's heart was broke. 
She run her hand all through her hair 
Like a lady in despair. 

6 She called for a chair to sit upon. 
A pen and ink to write it down. 

At the end of every line she dropped a tear. 
At the end of every verse cried : O my dear. 



293 



Sweet William 

7 Go dig my grave both wide and deep, 
A marble stone at my head and feet. 
Upon my breast there'll come a turtle dove 
To show the world that I died of love. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 4, b. 



Sung hy Mrs. RosiE Hensley 
at Carmen, N. C, Aug. 10, 191 6 



i ^=T=r = ?^ 



£ 



^^=^t 



:t 



I. She run her boat a - gainst the main, She spied three ships a 



g 



?=i' 



sail - ing from Spain ; She halt - ed each cap - tain as 




he . passed by, 

* Sometimes sharpened. 



O . there she en-quired of her sweet sol-dier boy. 



2 O captain, O captain, tell me true, 

Does my sweet soldier boy sail with you ? 

answer me quick and that will give me joy, 
For I never loved none like my sweet soldier boy. 

3 O lady, O lady, he's not here, 

He got killed in the battle, my dear ; 

At the head of Rocky Isle, as we passed by, 

There we saw your soldier boy lie. 

4 She wrung her hands all in her hair 
Just like a lady in despair ; 

She rowed her boat against a rock. 

1 thought in my soul the lady's heart was broke. 



Ileptatonic. Mode i, a + b 
( mixolydian influence ). * 
{a) 



Sung by Mr. Jehu Harris 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 12, 1916 



-I- 



A sol - dier's trade is a cru - el hfe, It robs poor wo -men of their 

* In Mode 4, a + b, with sharpened 7th. 

294 



Sweet William 



m^m 



^^^EiE^EE^ 



^ 



-^ 0- 



^i» 



imi 



t ^ l^ — h- [- 



hearts' de - light. If . he would re - turn that would give me joy, For I 



loved 



ny 



but my 



sol 



i 



(") 



¥ 



dier 



boy. 



D 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b 
( with flattened 6th ). 



"f== 



-^— -f 



W=m- 



s 



jK 



Sung by Mr. W. Riley Shelton 
at Alleghany, N. C, Aug. 29, 1916 

(") 



A sol-dier's life is a cru - el . life; He robs young girls of their 
^ (i) -^ (^) 



P 



r- 



hearts' de - light. He caus - es them to sife, weep and mourn The 



i 



t: 



^ 



I 



a 



loss 
(a) 



of 



sol - dier 



§i=t: 



ne - ver 



^^- 



to 






re - turn. 



-i — 



=#^- 



(0 



(c) 



(0 



I 



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:t=t=t:: 



295 



No. 107 



Good Morning, My Pretty Little Miss 



Heptatonic. Mode 4, a + b 
(mixolydian ). 



Sung by Mrs. Hester House 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 14, 1916 



i 



^f 



4=it 





I. Good morn - ing, good morn 

9~, — ^ p^^^ — w — f^^ 1 


■ing, 


my pret 


- ty lit - 


tie Miss, 

1 ; 


The be - 


z^ 


^^— T — r f> r — ^ f- 
4 — 1 w. — 1 — 1 — 1 ' — 


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ft ~» 


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3=3- 


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^ 


L.i_l — 






-^•— J— ' 



a 



gin - ning of my song. O . Lor, says he, won't you 

(a) 



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-i^ 



¥^ 



-IS)— 



mar - ry me? She an - swers: I'm 



(a) 



too young. 



i 



9=r- 



SE 



^ 



^ 



2 The younger you be the better for me, 
More fitting for to be my bride, 

For I wanted to say on my wedding day 
That I married my bride in maze. 

3 He courted her by compliment 
Till he got her to comply ; 

He courted her with a merry mood. 
All night with him she lay. 

4 The night has passed and the day has come. 
The morning sun do shine. 

I will arise, said he, put on my clothes, 
And then, sweet love, I'm gone. 

5 O that's not what you promised me 
All down by the greenwood side. 
You promised for to marry me 
And make me your sweet bride. 

6 If ever I promised to marry you, 
It was all in a merry mood, 

For I'll avow and will swear, 
I never was born for you. 



296 



Good Morning, My Pretty Little Miss 

7 I never will believe another man, 
County, city nor town, 

Unless the gallows was around him tied, 
And wishing himself safe down. 

8 For girls can go to market town. 
Go dressed so neat and fine. 

While me a poor girl must stay at home 
And rock the cradle and spin. 

9 I can sing as lonesome a song 
As any little bird in the cage. 

O sixteen weeks astray have been gone, 
And scarcely fifteen years of age. 



297 



No. io8 



My Mother Bid Me 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, a. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry, 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Aug. 24, 1916 



f^ 



1^ 



=^ 



:J? 



I. My mo - ther she 



told 



to 



set him 



chair, 



For 



I could not have him. 



set him a chair and he 



;h 



' ^ ^ ^r-Tj7 

looked like a dear, With his old shoes on and his leg - gings. 

2 My mother she told me to set him a stool. 
I set him a stool and he looked like a fool. 

3 My mother she told me to tell him to come back no more. 
I told him to come back no more, but he hung in the door. 

4 My mother told me to run him away. 

I run him away, but he come back the next day. 

5 My mother told me to ride him a path. 

I rode him a path, then he went the road fast. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm, 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



count -ing of me. With his old beard, and you may shave him. 



M 



(^) 



W- 



298 



1 — 


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d 


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I. There 




was 


an 


old 


man came 


- ver 

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the 




sea. 




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1 














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and 


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s 

won't have him, 


s 

Came - ver 


the 


sea 


a 


- 




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"■ • II 



My Mother Bid Me 

2 My mother she told me to give him a chair. 

I gave him a chair and he called me his dear. 

3 My father he told me to give him a stool. 
I gave him a stool and he sat like a fool. 

4 My mother she told me to give him some bread. 
I give him some bread and he nodded his head. 

5 My father he told me to give him some meat. 

I cive him some meat and lord 1 how he did eat. 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, a ( no 6tli ) . 




Sung by Mrs. Minnie Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 18, 1916 



m 



I. My mo - ther bid me to give 



him 



stool ; 



No, no, I would not have him. I gave him a stool and he 



:A=:t 



I 



looked like a fool. With his tore - up shoes and leg - gings. 

2 My mother bid me to give him something to eat. 

I gave him something to eat and he kicked me six feet. 

3 My mother bid me to fix him a bed. 

I fixed him a bed and he wished he was dead. 



299 



No. 109 

The Ten Commandments 



Pentatonic. Mode i. 



Sung by Mrs. Sarah Bucknkr 
at Black Mountain, N. C, Sept. 19, 1916 






12 are the 12 A 


- pos 


- ties; 


II 


are the 1 1 


that went 


to heav'n,And 


ytfih 1 ^ 1^ 1 




1 


K S 1 






/^ 3+ 1 J 1 


1 , 


J ' i ' 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


iC^ ' m • * • 


1 1 


^ ^ ^ ^ 1 


11 




>-,& 


-^— 




www 


— J^ 


L» — 


— J • 1 



10 are the 10 com - mand-ments ; 9 are the 9 both bright and shine, And 



^$t=i 



S 



:=t 



-A N- 



± 



• S i<— 

8 are the Ga - briel an - gels ; 7 are the 7 stars placed in the skies, And 



—I — J 1- 



t=t 



-A — ^- 



• • 4- — ir— 

6 are the small be - la - ters ; 5 are the f am - bu o - ver the bo, And 



ife 



w 



4 are the gos - pel ma - kers ; And 3 of . them was stri - vers ; 



=t 



^m 



2 of them was li - ly-white babes And dress them all in green ; And 



3^ 



-^ 



one and one are all a - lone And e - ver - more shall be 



B 



Narrated by Miss Dell Westmoreland, 
White Co., Ga., 1908 



( I St voice ) 

Come and I will sing you. 

( 2nd voice ) 

What will you sing me ? 

( ist voice) 

I will sing you one. ( two, three, etc. in successive verses. ) 

(2nd voice ) 

What is your one ? ( two, three, etc. ) 

300 



The Ten Commandments 

( ist voice) 

One, O One was God alone and he shall ever remain so. 

12 ( ist voice) 

Come and I will sing you. 
(2nd voice) 
etc., etc. 



( ist voice ) 

Twelve are the twelve apostles, 

Eleven are the eleven who went to Heaven, 

Ten are the ten commandents. 

Nine are the nine that dress so fine, 

Eight are the great Archangels, 

Seven are the seven stars fixed in the sky, 

Six are the cheerful waiters, 

Five are the farmers in a boat, 

Four are the Gospel preachers. 

Three of them are strangers. 

Two O two are the lily-white babes clothed in darling green O, 

One O One was God alone and he shall ever remain so. 



Narrated by Miss Dickey, 
Asheville, N. C, 1915 

( ist voice) 
Now I'll sing. 

( 2nd voice ) 
O what shall I sing ? 
(ist voice) 
O I'll sing twelve. 
Twelve disciples, 
Eleven apostles, 
Ten commandments, 
Nine unbelievers. 
Eight captain angels. 
Seven sennets in the sky. 
Six single weavers. 
Five fingers on the bowl, 
Four Gospel teachers, 
Three are thrivers, 

Two and two are under brides sitting on the green row, 
One and One are all alone, never more to be so. 

301 



No. no 



The Tree in the Wood 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



P^si 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 
(a) 



'& 



:t 



s 



iN— zN: 



^ 



4: 



P^fcS 



I. There was a tree all in the woods, Ve - ry nice and a hand-some 



'^^-- 



-^ — H — ^- 



^ S N ^ N" 

f^ — Ts — P — i^ — ^^- 



-ny- 



t- 



tree. The tree in the woods,And the woods a - way . down in the 

=8: 



m 



¥^=q^ 



t^ 



-^ — ^- 



^ — P\ — =s=]t 



^i 



i 



val - ley, A - way . down in the val-ley. 2. And on that tree there 

(a) 



:fc=l 



^^3= 



t-- 



u 



was a limb, Ve - ry nice and a hand - some limb. And the 



^ 



4t 



it 



-1^- 



-• • L^ 



y 



limb on the tree, And the tree in the woods. And the woods a • 

(d) dal % 



-^ 



-75*- 



:b= 



way . down in the val - ley, A - way . down in the val - ley. 



Pi 



^i=^ 



=^ 



u 



t=^- 



-^ 



N N 



a 



3 And on that limb there was a twig, etc. 

4 And on that twig there was a nest, etc. 

5 And in that nest there was an egg, etc. 

6 And in that egg there was a bird, etc. 

7 And on that bird there was a down, etc. 



• This bar is repeated in subsequent verses as often as necessary. 

302 



The Tree in the Wood 

And on that down there was a feather, 

Very nice and a handsome feather ; 

And the feather on the down, 

And the down on the bird. 

And the bird in the egg. 

And the egg in the nest, 

And the nest on the twig, 

And the twig on the limb. 

And the limb on the tree, 

And the tree in the woods, 

And the woods away down in the valley, 

Away down in the valley. 



303 



NURSERY SONGS 



305 



No. 



Ill 



The Farmyard 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 (no 6th). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 



r^=l- 



=t 



^Zlil 



::i^: 



L^ 



I. Had me a cat and the cat pleased me, Fed my cat 



:t=: 



@ 



r^=^ 



-s'- 



yon - ders tree ; The cat 



went 



fid - die 



dee. 



-_^— 



:fc:^v 



^±a 






Jznt 



:t^t 



:. Had me a dog and the dog pleased me, Fed my dog in yon ders tree ; The 

* {a) # 



-rir 



«- 



dog went boo, boo, boo. And the 

\<1) FourtJi z'erse 



cat went fid - die - i - dee. 



/rh^ 1 


J ^-F- 


1 


s 


-It- 


# 


-?=:^ -2 


-W 4-1^ 


-^=ii^ 


S 


1 


^ 




_jL_i__^ 



hog went 



kru - si, kru - si, kru - si. The 



3 The hen went ka, ka, ka. 

4 The hog went kru-si, kru-si, kru-si. 

5 The sheep went baa, baa, baa. 

6 The cow went moo, moo, moo. 

7 The calf went ma, ma, ma. 

T/iis song can be extended at will by adding the names and characteristic cries of 
other afiimals. 



*The passage between the asterisks is sung twice in the third verse, three times in the fourth verse ( first time as in 
variant, a), and so on, ad lib, 

307 



No. 112 

The Drummer and His Wife 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 





Pentatonic. 


Mode I.* 
(a) 












at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 

3 SKI, 




/ttw9 


[S [S 


fv 








)^^ 


^ N 


I ' ! ' 1 1 ! 


^ 


^v>4—4 — 


—^ ^ — 


s — 


— J 


— 


—^ — 




— 1 1 — 


-• — • — • ^ 1 


m-^-^^ 











• 


—0 — 


*- 



I. The drum-mer told his wife he could do more in one day Than 



E«^^P^ 



=t^i 



she could do in three, three, She told him to take her place then And 



*EEE± 



^ 



-s — i^ — ^ 



^-- 



:^~-i 



i 



~S — *- 

she'd go to the plough. And she'd go to the plough,plough,And she'd go to the 

N N 



:^= 



d= 



a 



::l=i± 



plough. She told him to take her place then And she'd go to the plough. 



\^I 



(a^ { In all verses except the first) 



:=1=]: 



Id: 



3^=ji=it 



^- 



l=i 



;^i 



2 She told him to milk the crumply cow, 
For fear she would go dry, dry ; 

She told him to feed that speckled pig 
That lay up in the sty. 

3 She told him to churn the churn of cream 
That set up in the frame, frame ; 

She told him to watch the pot of fat. 
Or it'd go up in a flame. 

4 She told him to feed that speckled hen, 
For fear she would go stray, stray ; 

She told him to remember the spool of thread 
That she spun was to-day. 

5 The drummer went to milk the crumply cow, 
For fear she would go dry, dry. 

She hoist her head and give a snort. 
And wouldn't let drummer come a-nigh. 



• If G be tonic : — Mode 3. 



308 



The Drummer and His Wife 

6 He went to feed the speckled pig 
That lay up in the sty, sty. 

He hit his head agin' the beam, 

And the blood came trinkling down. .„ " 

7 He went to churn the churn of cream 

That set up in the frame, frame ; , .. 

And he forgot the pot of fat, 
And it went up in the flame. 

8 He went to feed the speckled hen, . "' 
For fear she would go stray, stray; ' _ ' 
And he forgot the spool of thread 

She spun was to-day. 

9 The drummer told his wife that she could do more in one day 
Than he could do in three, three. 

And if she'd only take her place again 
He'd never grumble no more. 



309 



No. 113 



The Bird Song 

A 



Pentatonic. Mode 2. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 12, 1916 




I. Says the ro-bin as he flew: When I was a young man I choosedtwo. If 



:l2=?: 



w 






f:]= 



£ 



:p 



11 



one did - n't love me the o-ther one would, And don't you think my no-tion's good ? 

2 Says the blackbird to the crow : 
What makes white folks hate us so ? 
For ever since old Adam was born, 
It's been our trade to pull up corn. 

3 Hoots 1 says the owl with her head so white, 
A lonesome day and a lonesome night. 
Thought I heard some pretty girl say, 
She'd court all night and sleep next day. 

4 No, no, says the turtle dove, 
That's no way for to gain his love. 

If you want to gain his heart's delight, 

Keep him awake both day and night. 

One for the second and two for the go. 

And I want another string to my bow, bow, bow. 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 2, b. 



Sung by Miss Lily Roberts who learned 
it from Mr. Attwood in Vermont 



il?S=± 




:J=:J= 



-^ — N- 



fc— jv 



1^=f^=^ 



±=Mz 



s — ^— #- 



Hi, says the black-bird sit-ting on a chair, Once I court-ed a la - dy fair; 



£ 



-^- 



She proved fic-kle and turned her back. And e - ver since then I'm dressed in black. 



i 



M= 



=i: 



^ 



:i 



^ 



P 



Tow - dy ow - dy dil do dum, Tow - dy, ow - dy dil do day, 

310 



The Bird Song 




Tow - dy ow - dy dil do dum, Tal lal lie die dil do day. 

2 Hi, says the blue-jay as she flew, 

If I was a young man I'd have two ; 

If one proved fickle and chanced for to go, 

I'd have a new string to my bow. 

3 Hi, says the little leather-winged bat, 
I will tell you the reason that, 

The reason that I fly in the night 
Is because I lost my heart's delight. 

4 Hi, says the little mourning-dove, 
I'll tell you how to gain her love. 
Court her night and court her day ; 
Never give her time to say ' O nay '. 

5 Hi, says the woodpecker sitting on a fence, 
Once I courted a handsome wench ; 

She proved fickle and from me fled, 
And ever since then my head's been red. 

6 Hi, says the owl with my eyes so big, 
If I had a hen I'd feed like a pig ; 
But here I sit on a frozen stake, 
Which causes my poor heart to ache. 

7 Hi, says the swallow sitting on a barn, 
Courting, I think, is no harm. 

I pick my wings and sit up straight, 

And hope every young man will choose his mate. 

8 Hi, says the hawk unto the crow. 

If you ain't black then I don't know. 
Ever since old Adam was born, 
You've been accused of stealing corn. 

9 Hi, says the crow unto the hawk, 
I understand your great big talk. 
You'd like to pounce and catch a hen, 
But I hope the farmer will shoot you then. 

lo Hi, says the robin with a squirm, 
I wish I had a great big worm ; 
I would fly away into my nest ; 
I have a wife I think is the best 



311 



No. 114 

Sourwood Mountain 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mr. Will Biggers 
at Rome, Ga., August, 1913 



ntt 














yfTiii 


• • 1 


/L 5'+ 1 rL - ■ - - 


1 1 J 


rh "4 ^ 


l-V 1 i> I's 


•'J 


\s\) 4- J J '■ 1 '1 


1 1 d 


\y 4 m 
I. Chick - ens 


• • mm 

a - crow - ing in Sour - wood Moun - tain, 

0. N 


t' '11 '^ p 


r 




1 1 


/'"ft J J 1 1 




1^ fN 1 1 


t>. k. ■ ■ 


/? \ « ^ • m m 


4 • 




J J J 1^ ^ 


Ik; 


9.9 J .1 


m m d 11 


Hay did - dy ump, 


- • « 

did - dy id - dy um day. Get your dogs and we'll 


/ ' Tit V K. 


\ 1 


i^ r^ 


/• u 1 ^ 1^ 1 




J J 1 ^ 


((\ ^ \ J J 


1 ^ ^ 1 * * 


d d \ ^ 


V\L1 — J ^— ^— J- 


A 


^-4 — 4 — 4 — 4 -^ 


L ^_! 



all go a - hunt - ing, Hay did - dy ump, did - dy id - dy um day. 

2 Raccoon canter and 'possum trot, 
Black cur wrestle with a hickory knot. 

3 Bring your old dog, get your gun, 
Kill some game and have a little fun. 

4 Jaybird sitting on a hickory limb, 
My six-foot rifle will sure get him. 

5 Gather that game and at home I'll rack, 
Got as much good meat as I can carry. 

6 I got a gal in the head of the hollow, 
She won't come and I won't follow. 

7 She sits up with old Si Hall, 

Me and Jeff can't go there at all. 

8 Some of these days before very long, 
I'll get that girl and a-home I'll run. 



312 



No. 115 



The Foolish Boy 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by a schoolgirl 
at Hindman, Ky., Dec. 1907 




M ^— f- 



-A— N— N-A- 



-N— N- 



-A— N 



-^-^- 



A 



I. When I was a lit -tie boy, I lived by myself, And all the bread and cheese I got I 




i 



laid them on 



the 

N- 



shelf. 



Tum 



--v 



wing waw wad - die, tum 

-N s N-rH 1 



:H 



jack straw strad-dle, Tum a John paw fad - die, tum a long way home. 

2 The rats and the mice they gave me such a Ufe, 
I had to go to London to get me a wife. 

3 The roads were so long and the streets were so narrow, 
I had to bring her home on an old wheelbarrow. 

4 My foot slipped and I got a fall, 
Down went wheelbarrow, wife and all. 

5 I swapped my wheelbarrow and got me a horse. 
And then I rode from cross to cross. 

6 I swapped me a horse and got me a mare. 
And then I rode from fair to fair. 

7 I swapped my mare and got me a cow. 
And in that trade I just learned how. 

8 I swapped my cow and got me a calf. 
And in that trade I just lost half. 

9 I swapped my calf and got me a mule. 
And then I rode like a dog-gone fool. 

10 I swapped my mule and got me a sheep. 
And then I rode myself to sleep. 

Ill swapped my sheep and got me a hen, 
O what a pretty thing I had then. 

12 I swapped my hen and got me a rat, 
Looks like two little cats upon a hay-stack. 

13 I swapped my rat and got me a mole, 

And the dog-gone thing went straight to its hole. 

313 



No. ii6 

Harm Link 



i 



Pentatonic. Mode 3, a. 

-A N . 



Sung by Mr. Alfred Norton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



• — d — ^ 4- 



-^ N- 



^ ^-j •- 



-t 



£ 



P=fc^ 



-\/ V- 



Come all you po - ga girls, lis - ten to my song, Made on Harm Link, he 



=1: 



--t 



^^^^^p^^l;l 



— •^^ 

raised no corn. The rea-son why I can't tell For I am sure he's al-ways well. 




J^ 



^- 



^^ 



2 As he went over to Ben Beard's 
Expecting her courtship to come on, 
As the courtship it came on, 

Sir Jane says: Harm, have you hoed out your corn ? 

3 Harm he answered with a quick reply : 
Yes, Sir Jane, I've laid her by. 

If any more it's all in vain. 

For I don't think it will make one grain. 

4 Sir Jane says : Harm, if you can't make bread, 
I am very sorry you asked me to wed. 

Single I am, single I'll remain; 
A lazy man I'll never maintain. 

5 He went to the fence and he peeped in, 
The weeds and grass was up to his chin, 
The weeds and grass it grew so high, 

It made poor Harm Link weep and cry. 

6 In July it was ankle high. 
In September he laid it by, 

In October there came a great frost. 

A sight to see the corn that Harm Link lost. 



314 



No. 117 
Sing, Said the Mother 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. jANE Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C. Sept. 15, 1916 



i 



^i 






-(2- 



F=r=E 



I. O - ver in the mead-ows in the nest in the tree, Lived an 



-^ — •- 



-d — «- 



-s^— 



3t^: 



^— ^ 



old mo-ther bird - y and her lit - tie bir- dies three. Sing, said the mo-ther; we 



J M: 



;r=^ 



^ 



i 



T^ # 



-^ g 



^5*- 



sing, said the three. So they sang and were glad in the nest in the tree. 

2 Over in the meadows in the sand in the sun 
Lived an old mother toady and her little toady one. 
Hop, said the mother ; we hop, said the one. 

So they hopped and were glad in the sand in the sun. 

3 Over in the meadows in a sly little den 

Lived an old mother spider and her little spiders ten. 

Spin, said the mother ; we spin, said the ten. 

So they spun and caught flies in their sly little den. 



315 



No. ii8 



I Whipped My Horse 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 



^-#- 



I. I whipped my horse 

n 


till I cut the blood, I whipped my horse till I 


' 1 1 1 1 h. 


1 '^ ^ 




/ r? 1 r 


J ^ ^ J 


1 ^ ^ 1 


ff\^ J M J _l 






IS ; • • ^ • s 


II 


LJ \ ^ — ^ — 1 



cut the blood, I whipped my horse till I cut the blood, And 



Ei^^^~'r::^3=^=d= rg^^^ 



then 



I made him trod the mud. Coy ma lin dow, 



l¥. 



kill 



ko, kill ko, Coy ma lin dow, kill ko me. 



2 I fed my horse in a poplar trough, 

And there he caught the whooping cough. 

3 I fed my horse in a silver spoon, 
And then he kicked it over the moon. 

4 My old horse is dead and gone, 

But he left his jaw bones ploughing the corn. 



316 



No. 119 

A Frog He Went A-courting 



A 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b. 



Sung by Mrs. ToM RiCE 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 16, 1916 



?# 



2: 



-5f— S- 



I. A frog he went a-court-ing and he did ride, a - ha, 



f=E 



frog he went a - court - ing and he did ride With a sword and pis - tol 



i 



m 



■2z 



333E£ 



^ 



by his side, a 



ha. 



Steam stem a bum a tum, a 



g 



W 



2b± 



fct 






ling dum a lar - er, 



ha. 



g 



:^=^ 



Steam stem a bum a tum, a 



^^H 



w 



r=P=?=P=p: 



itzzt: 



:^=p: 



jtizMz 



itzzi: 



ling dum a lar - er, Rig dum a bee - ly mat a ki - mo, ki - mo, ha. 



2 The first come in was a bumble bee 
With his banjo on his knee. 

3 The next come in was a nimble flea 
To take a jig with the bumble bee. 

4 The next come in was a kitten and a cat, 
And the next come was the old man rat. 

5 The lady mouse she tore up the wall. 
Her foot it slipped and she did fall. 

6 The frog he went to town 

To buy a little niece's wedding gown. 

7 The frog he went across the brook. 

The black snake swallowed him down his crook. 



317 



A Frog He Went A-courting 



B 



Hexatonic. Mode 3, b (Tone F). 



Sung by Mrs. Jane Gentry 
at Hot Springs, N. C, Sept. 15, 1916 

N — N — ] 



!#= 



iv-iv 



^—]—\r^ ^ S ^- 



±3t 



I. The frog went a-court- ing he did ride, h'm, h'm, The frog went a -court- ing 
(a) 



:t^=^ 



--^ 



:^- 



he did ride With the sword and pis - tol by his side, h'm, h'm. 

(a) 



i 



w. 



^ 



2 He rode up to Miss Mouse's door 
Where he had never been before. 

3 He says : Miss Mouse, won't you marry me ? 
No, not without Uncle Rat will agree. 

4 Uncle Rat went a-running down to town 
To get his niece a wedding gown. 

5 The frog would laugh and shake his fat sides 
To think that mouse would be his bride. 

6 O where will the wedding supper be ? 
Away down yonder in the hollow tree. 

7 O what will the wedding supper be ? 
Three green beans and a black eyed pea. 

8 The first come in was a bumble bee 
With his fiddle on his knee. 

9 The next come in was an old fat goose, 
He began to fiddle and she got loose. 

10 The next come in was the old torn cat, 
He says : I'll put a stop to that. 

1 1 The goose she then flew up on the wall, 
And then she got an awful fall. 

12 The goose she then flew up on the wall, 
And old tom cat put a stop to it all. 



318 



No. I20 



The Frog in the Well 



Heptatonic. Major Mode. 



Sung by Mr. N. B. Chisholm 
at Woodridge, Va., Sept. 23, 1916 



^- 



^ 



N 1 



^ 



^- 



:2i 



-2^ 



i 



I. There was a frog lived in the spring, Sing song Kit- ty can't you 



3^Ei 



¥ 



ki - mey O, He was so fat that he could not swim. 




Singsong Kit - ty can't you ki - mey O. Kee-mey O ma ki - mey O ma 



i 



I-- 



^fe^s 



:?=^ 



tfi 



dir - ey O ma wear, Me hi, me ho, me in come Sal - ly Sin - gle, 



S 



t — ^ 



Some time Pen - ny Win - kle, In stepped nip 



cat, 



m^^- 



-• — ^ 



Hit him with a brick bat, Sing song Kit - ty can't you ki - mey O. 

2 Who's been here since I've been gone? 

A pretty little man with his new shoes on. 

3 A pretty little dandy man, said she, 
With a crooked back and a strip-ed knee. 

4 The frog went a-swimming across the lake. 
He got swallowed by a big, black snake. 



319 



No. 121 

The Carrion Crow 



Pentatonic. Mode 3. 



Sung by Mrs. ToM Rice 
at Big Laurel, N. C, Aug. 17, 1916 



i 



¥ 



I 



^ 



I. He shot it at that car- rion crow, And missed his mark and shot Dad Sow. 



i 



f^- 



ps^^ 



i:2: 



4zz^ 





Till 


a hel - ly bil - ly 


ling dum, Bil - ly cum 

* * s ^ 


a 


ki 


■ 


me. 


L£z_^.^ 


^^r= 


P f •-— f-^ 


-^ — t^ — \ 1 T 




— 1 — 


-f- 


-T— r — 




U l^ 1 1 


^-- — - — ^ 1-— -^— 


V 


—y 


-F — t=d 



Kate em a lar - ey, Lit - tie Tom Par - ey, Kate em a lar - ey, 



r-ftl . . 






T^ C u r-r-n 

C^Z ^ ^ \ 


'v ■■ -k ■ 


1 9-. 1 1 1 1 1 1 Kc Kr — 



Lit - tie Tom-my Wee, And up jumped Penny and he called for the hogs.Till a 



i 



I 



hel - ly bil - ly Hng dum, Bil - ly cum a ki - 

2 He carried her up into the house, 

And had a good mess of cheese and souse. 



320 



No. 122 



The Old Grey Mare 
A 



Pentatonic. Mode 3 (Tonic G). 



Sung by Harry, Ralph and Dayton Norton 
at Rocky Fork, Tenn., Aug. 31, 1916 



^ 



I. Once I had an old grey mare, Once I had an old grey mare, 



^=i= 



Once I had an old grey mare; Sad - died her and rode her there. 

2 When I got there she got tired ; 
She laid down in an old court-yard. 

3 Then they begin to sing and pray ; 
She jumped up and run away. 

4 Then I went down the road on her track ; 
Found her in a mud-hole flat on her back. 

5 Then I begin to fee] very stout; 

Seized her by the tail and jerked her out 

6 Then I begin to think it no sin ; 
Jerked my knife and begin to skin. 

7 Then I put her old hide in a loft ; 
Up came a nigger and stole it off. 



32i 



The Old Grey Mare 



Hexatonic. Mode i, b. 



m 



B 



Sung by Mr. Jeff Stockton 
at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 4, 1916 



I. O once I bought me an old grey mare, 



O 



once I bought me an old grey mare, O once I bought me an 



:1^ 




old grey mare, She could - n't see, nor she could - n't hear. 

i ^ — N 



:^c=:^: 



t^ 



^ 



m 



Fray dum a doo dum a die day. Fray dum a doo dum a die day. 

2 O then I turned her down the creek ; 
Proposed her to get her some grass to eat. 

3 O then, O then I took her track, 

And found her in a mud-hole flat on her back. 

4 O then, O then I thought it no sin ; 

I took out my knife and began to skin. 

5 O then I put her hide in the loft. 

And some blamed rogue came packed it off. 

6 O some blamed rogue corne packed it off, 
And left my clothes to take the frost. 



322 



NOTES 

No. I. The False Knight upon the Road. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 3. Compare, also, "Harpkin," Chambers's Popular 

Rhymes of Scotland, p. 66. 
Texts with tunes: — Motherwell's Minstrelsy, Appendix, p. xxiv., and tune No. 32. 

Child, v., 411. 
American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxiv., 344. 

The Introduction to version A, "A knight met a child on the road," sung by the singer 
by way of preface, is very unusual, if not unique. 

No. 2. Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 4. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 

106. Miss Burne's Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 548. 
Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 246; ii., 282; iv., 116. English 

County Songs, p. 164. Kidson's Traditional Tunes, pp. 27 and 172. Northumbrian 

Minstrelsy, p. 48. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 84. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 132 (with tune); xix., 232, 

xxii., 65, 76 (tune only) and 374 (with tune); xxiii., 375; xxiv., 344; xxvii., 90; xxviii.; 

148. Wyman and Brock way's Lonesome Tunes, p. 82. 

"My Colleen" in A may, or may not be, a corruption of the May Colvin, Colven, or 
Collins of other versions. 

No. 3. Earl Brand. 

Texts without tunes:— Child, No. 7. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 

57- 
Text with tune: — Northumbrian Minstrelsy, p. 31. 

No. 4. The Two Sisters. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 10. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, L, pp. 40 and 42. Journal of the 

Folk-Song Society, i., 253, and ii., 282. English County Songs, p. 118. Northumbrian 

Minstrelsy, p. 61. Child, v., pp. 41 1 and 412 (three tunes). "Binnorie," arrang<^d 

by Dr. Arthur Somervell. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 130 (with tune); xviii., 130 

(without tune); xix., 233. 

Compare the refrain in A, "Jury flower gent the rose-berry," with "Jennifer gentle and 
rosemaree," in "Riddles Wisely Expounded" {Child, No. I, B). 

323 



324 Notes 



No. 5. The Cruel Brother. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 1 1. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 1 09. Gilbert's Ancient 

Christmas Carols, 2nd ed., p. 68. Child, v., 412. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxviii., 300 (with tune). 

The version given in the text is a close variant of Davies Gilbert's, which, it should be 
noted, was collected in the West of England. 

No. 6. Lord Randal. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 12. Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 95. 

Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 112. 
Texts with tunes: — Miss Broad wood's Traditional Songs and Carols, p. 96. A Garland 

of Country Song, No. 38. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 29; iii., 43; v., 117, 122 

and 245. Folk Songs from Somerset, Nos. 13 and 14. Child, v., pp. 412 and 413. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xiii., 115; xvi., 258-264 (three 

tunes); xviii., 195 (ten tunes); xxii., 75 (tune only); xxii., 376 (with tune); xxiv.,345. 

Musical Quarterly, January, 1916, p. 19. 

No. 7. Edward. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 13. 

The single stanza of B may, or may not, belong to this ballad. Mrs. Hensley learnt it 
from her father who often sang this particular stanza, but never, to her recollection, sang 
any other lines. 

No. 8. Sir Lionel. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 18. 

Text with tune: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., no. 

American variants: — Jourttal of American Folk-Lore, xix., 235; xxv., 175. 

No. 9. The Cruel Mother. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 20. Miss Bume's Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 540. 

Texts with tunes: — Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads, p. 44 and Appendix. Child, 
v., 413. Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 105 and 107. Journal of the Folk- 
Song Society, ii., 109; iii., 70. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 98. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxv., 183. 

No. 10. The Three Ravens. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 26. 

Texts with tunes:— Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 17. Motherwell's Minstrelsy, 

Appendix xviii., tune No. 12. Melismata, No. 20. 
American variants: — Jourttal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 154 (no tune). 

No. II. The Two Brothers. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 49. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvi., 361 (no time); xxix., 158. 

It is worthy of note that versions A and B both contain allusions in their earlier stanzas 
to the sweetheart, the cause of the quarrel; whereas not one of the other published texts makes 



Notes 325 



mention of the sweetheart until the conclusion of the ballad. Mrs. Smith sang her version 
(B) to the accompaniment of the guitar which possibly may account for the harmonic character 
of the time. 

No. 12. Yoimg Beichan. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 53. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, 
{., art. 78, ii., art. 1 12. Logan's Pedlar's Pack of Ballads, p. 1 1. Broadsides by Pitts, 
Catnach and Jackson. Miss Burne's Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 547. Garret's Merrie 
Book of Garlands, vol. iii. 

Texts with tunes: — Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads, p. 260 (tune in Appendix). 
Child, v., 415. Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., pp. 8 and 31. Northumbrian 
Minstrelsy, p. 64. Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 33. English County Songs, p. 62. 
Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 65. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 240; iii., 192- 
200. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 209; xx., 251; xxii., 64 and 
78 (tune only). Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 58. 

No. 13. The Cherry Tree Carol. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 54. Hone's Ancient Mysteries Described, p. 90. 

Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 160. 
Texts with tunes: — Husk's Songs of the Nativity, p. 194. English Folk-Carols, Nos. 3 

and 4. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 260; v., II and 321. 

No. 14. Fair Annie. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 62. 

No. 15. Young Hunting. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 68. 

Text with tune: — Child, v., 416. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 252. 

Compare "And you shall have the cheers of a cherry cold girl" of D. 4 with "Ye shall hae 
cheer, an charcoal clear" in Child's version K. 4. 

No. 16. Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 73. Broadside by Catnach. Miss Burne's Shrop- 
shire Folk-Lore, p. 545. 

Texts with tunes: — Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 40. English County Songs, p. 42. 
Mrs. Leather's Folk-Lore of Herefordshire, p. 200. Sandys's Christmas Carols, tune 
18. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 105; v., 130. Rimbault's Musical Illus- 
trations to Percy's Reliques, p. 94. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 128 (one tune); xix., 235; 
XX., 254; xxviii., 152. One Hundred English Folk-Songs (Ditson), No. 28 (with tune). 

No. 17. Fair Margaret and Sweet William. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 74. Ashton's Century of Ballads, p. 345. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 117. Journal of the Folk- 
Song Society, ii., 289; iii., 64. Folk-So7igs of England, i., No. 14. Rimbault's Musical 
Illustrations to Percy's Reliques, pp. 117 and 118. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xix., 281; x.xiii., 381; xxviii., 154. 
Wjmian and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 94. Musical Quarterly, January, 1916, 
p. 18. 



326 Notes 



No. 18. Lord Lovel. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 75. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the Norlh-East, art. 

ii-, 159- 
Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 289; iii., 64. Child, v., p. 416. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xix., 283. One Hundred English 

Folk-Songs (Ditson), No. 26 (with tune). Broadside by H. De Marsan, New York, 

Musical Quarterly, January, 1916, p. 5. 

No. 19. The Wife of Usher's WeU. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 79. 

Text with tune: — Mrs. Leather's Folk-Lore of Herefordshire, p. 198. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xiii., 119; xxiii., 429. 

Texts A and C are remarkable in that the children cite the mother's "proud heart" as 
the reason that has caused them to "lie in the cold clay, " a motive which is absent from other 
English and Scottish versions. 

No. 20. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. 
Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 81. 

Text with tune: — Rimbault's Musical Illustrations to Percy's Reliques, p. 92. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxiii., 371; xxv., 182. 

No. 21. Barbara Allen. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 84. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., 
arts. 165 and 166. Ashton's Century of Ballads, p. 173. Aliss Burne's Shropshire 
Folk-Lore, p. 543. Garret's Merrie Book of Garlands, vol. ii. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 87 and 89. Journal of the 
Folk-Song Society, i., iii and 265; ii., 15 and 80. Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 37. 
Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 22. Journal of the Irish Folk-Song Society, i., 45. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, vi., 131 (with tune); xix., 285; 
XX., 250; xxii., 63 and 74 (tune only); xxix., 161. Musical Quarterly, January, 1916, 
p. 20 (tune only). Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. i. 

No. 22. Giles Collins. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 85. 

Texts with tunes: — Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs, p. 46. Journal 
of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 299. 

In a note {Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iv., 106), Miss Barbara M. Cra'ster argues that 
this ballad and Clerk Colvill are complementary or, rather, that they are both descended from 
a more complete form such as that given in Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 299. In the 
usual form in which Giles Collins is sung {e.g. the versions given in the text), no reason is given 
for Giles's death, and this, of course, robs the song of its point. This omission is supplied in 
the version above cited, but so far has not been found in any other variant. 

No. 23. Lamkin. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 93. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 61. Mrs. Leather's Folk-Lore 

of Herefordshire, p. 199. Folk-Songs of England, iv., p. 38. Journal of the Folk-Song 

Society, i., 212; ii., in; v., 81. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xiii., 117; xxix., 162. 



Notes 327 

No. 24. The Maid Freed from the Gallows. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 95. 

Texts with tunes: — English Cotmty Songs, p. 112. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 121. 

Journal of the Folk-Song Society, v., 228. 
American variants: — American Journal of Folk-Lore, xxi., 56; xxvi., 175. Musical 

Quarterly, January, 1916, pp. ID and 11 (without tunes). Wyman and Brockway's 

Lonesome Times, p. 44. 

No. 25. Johnie Scot. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 99. 

Texts witli tunes: — Motherwell's Minstrelsy, Appendix, tune No. 15. Child, v., p. 418. 

"Taverin" in the text is "Italian," "Tailliant, " "ItiHan, " or simply "champion" in 
other versions. Child tlirows light upon the incident by quoting a story (Revd. Andrew 
Hall's Interesting Roman Antiquities receyitly Discovered in Fife, 1823, p. 216) in which James 
JMacgill of Lindorcs is offered a pardon by Charles II. upon condition of his fighting an Italian 
gladiator or bully. In the contest which ensues, "the Italian actually leaped over his opponent 
as if he would swallow him alive, but in attempting to do this a second time Sir James run his 
sword up through him and then called out, 'I have spitted him; let them roast him who will.'" 
A similar story is related of the Breton seigneur Les Aubrays of St. Bricux, who is ordered by 
the French King to undertake a combat with his wild Moor (Luzel's Poesies popnlaircs de la 
France, MS., vol. i). 

No. 26. Sir Hugh. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 155. Miss Burnc's Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 539. 

Baring-Gould's Nursery Songs and Rhymes, pp. 92 and 94. 
Texts with tunes: — Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes, p. 46. English County Songs, p, 86. 

Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 68. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 264. Rim- 

bault's Musical Illustrations to Percy's Religues, p. 46, Motherwell's Minstrelsy, 

Appendix, xvii., tune No. 7. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xix., 293; xxix., 164. Newell's 

Games and Songs of American Children, p. 76. Musical Quarterly, January, 1916, 

p. 15 (three tunes). 

No. 27. The Gypsy Laddie. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 200. Miss Bume's Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 550. 

Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. no. Irish and English broadsides. 

Garret's Merrie Book of Garlands, vol. i. 
Texts with tunes: — Songs of the West, 2nd ed., No. 50. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 9. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 191 (7 versions, 3 with 

tunes); xix., 294; xxii., 80 (tune only); xxiv., 346; xxv., 171-T75. Broadside by H. 

De Marsan, New York (a comic parody). 

No. 28. Geordie. 

Texts with tunes: — Child, No. 209. Gavin Greig's Folk-Songs of the North-East, {., art. 
75. Broadside by Such. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, {., 53. Journal of the Folk-Song 
Society, ii., 27, 208; iii., 191; iv., 332. Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 25. Miss 
Broadwood's Traditional Songs and Carols, p. 32. Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads, 
p. 187 and tune. Folk-Songs of England, ii., p. 47. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 2. 



328 Notes 

No. 29. The Daemon Lover. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 243. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 84. Motherwell's Minstrelsy, 

Appendix xv., tune i. Songs of the West, 2nd ed., No. 76. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 207; xix., 295; xx., 257; 

xxvi., 360; XXV., 274 (with tune). Broadside by H. De Marsan, New York. Musical 

Quarterly, January, 1916, p. 18. 

No. 30. The Grey Cock. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 248. 

Texts with tunes: — Songster's CompanioJi, ii., 36, 2d cd. Scots Musical Museum, 1787, 

No. 76. Dick's The Songs of Robert Burns, pp. 100 and 386. Herbert Hughes's 

Irish Country Songs, vol. ii., p. 64. 

No. 31. The Suffolk Miracle. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 272, 

Each of the three tunes. A, B and C, is a variant of the carol air, "Christmas now is draw- 
ing near at hand" ( see Journal of the Folk-Song Society, v., pp. 7-1 1). 

No. 32. Our Goodman. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 274. Ford's Vagabond Songs of Scotland, ii., 31. 
Texts with tunes: — Songs of the West, 2d ed.. No. 30. Chambers's Songs of Scotland 

Prior to Burns, p. 184. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 294. Musical Quarterly, 

January, 19 16, p. 17 (tune only). 

No. 33. The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skm. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 277. Gavin Grcig's Folk-Song of the North-East, 
L, art. 13; and ii., art. 122. Ford's Song Histories, pp. 271-274. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 223; v., 260. Folk Song^ from 
Somerset, No. 97. Ford's Vagabond Songs of Scotland, p. 192. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, vii., 253; xix., 298. 

No. 34. The Farmer's Curst Wife. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 278. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 184; iii., 131. Dick's SoJigs of 

Robert Burets, No. 331. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xix., 298; xxvii., 68. Lomax's 

Cowboy Songs, p. no. 

"Bell, blubs," stanza 10, version A, may be a corruption of " Beelzebubs. " 
Most of the published versions of this song have whistling refrains. 

No. 35. The Golden Vanity. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 286. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, 

ii., arts. 116 and 119. 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 238. English County Songs, 

p. 182. Songs of the West, 2nd ed.. No. 64. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 104; 

ii., 244. Ford's Vagabond Songs of Scotland, p. 103. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xviii., 125 (two tunes). One 

Hundred English Folk-Songs (Ditson), p. 36. Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome 

Tunes, p. 72. 



Notes 329 



No. 36. The Brown Girl. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No. 295. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., 

art. 79. Broadside by Such, "Sally and her True Love Billy. " 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 241. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvii., 73. 

No. 37. The Trooper and the Maid. 

Texts without tunes: — Child, No, 299. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 210. Songs of the West, 2nd 
ed., No. 65. 

No. 38. In Seaport Town. 

Texts with tunes: — Jourjial of the Folk-Song Society, {., 160; ii., 42; v., 122,. Miss Broad- 
wood's Traditional Songs and Carols, p. 28. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 12. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 259; xxix., 168. 

No. 39. The Cruel Ship's Carpenter. 

Texts without tunes: — Broadsides by Pitts, Jackson & Son, and Bloomer (Birmingham) 

Ashton's A Cejitury of Ballads, p. loi. 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 99. Journal of the Folk-Song 

Society, i., 172. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 83. 
American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 262. 

No. 40. The Shooting of his Dear. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 59. Journal of the Irish Folk- 
Song Society, iii., 25. Songs of the West, 2nd ed.. No. 62. Folk Songs from Somerset, 
No. 16. "Molly Ban (pronounced Van) so fair," Petrie's Collection of Irish Music, 
Nos. 724 and 1171 (tunes only). 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 387. 

No. 41. The Lady and the Dragoon. 

Text without tune: — Broadside by Such. 

Text with tune: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 108. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxiii., 447. 

No. 43. The Holly Twig. 

Text without tune: — West Country Garlands (c. 1760). 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 315. Songs of the West, 2nd ed. 
No. 117. 

No. 44. Polly Oliver. 

Text without time: — Broadside by Such, 

Texts with tunes: — Chappell's Popular Music of the Olden Time, p. 676. Kidson's 

Traditional Times, p. 116. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xii., 248; xxii., 75 (tune only). 

Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 79. 

No. 45. The Rich Old Lady. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 13. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxviii., 174; xxix., 179. 



330 Notes 

No. 46. Edwin in the Lowlands Low. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, n., art. 123. Broad- 
side by Jackson & Son (Birmingham). 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 124; iii., 266. Journal of the 
Irish Folk-Song Society, iii., 24. Folk-Songs of England, iii., 38. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 274. 

No. 47. Awake, Awake. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 54. Broad- 
side (no imprint). 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 225. Journal of the Folk-Song 
Society, 1., 269; iii., 78. Songs of the West, 26. ed., No. 41. Folk Songs from Somerset, 
No. 99. Folk-Songs of England, v., 12. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 260; xxv., 282 (tune only). 

No. 48. The Green Bed. 

Texts without tunes: — Broadside by Jackson & Son (Birmingham). Gavin Greig's 

Folk-Song of the North East, ii., art. 115. 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 251. Songs of the West, 2nd 

ed.. No. 91. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 48; iii., 28 1 ; v., 68. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxv., 7. 

No. 49. The Simple Ploughboy. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 117. Broad- 
side by Jackson & Son (Birmingham). 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 132; iv., 304. Songs of the West, 
2nd ed.. No. 59. Joyce's Old Irish Folk-Music and Songs, p. 223. 

No. 50. The Three Butchers. 

Texts without tunes: — Roxhurghe Collection, iii., 30 and 496; iv., 80. Broadside by 
Pitts. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 36. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 174. Miss Broadwood's Tradi- 
tional Songs and Carols, p. 42. 

No. 51. William Taylor. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. loi. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 214; v., 68 and 161. Petrie's 
Collection of Irish Music, No. 745 (tune only). Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, 
ii., 209. Joyce's Old Irish Folk-Music and Songs, No. 424. Folk Songs from Somerset, 
Nos. 118 and 119. Journal of the Irish Folk-Song Society, v., 12. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 74 (tune only); xxii., 
380 (with tune). Broadside by H. De Marsan. 

No. 52. The Golden Glove. 

Texts without tunes: — Broadsides by Such, Catnach and Pitts. Gavin Greig's Folk- 
Song of the North-East, ii., art. 95. Bell's Songs of the Peasantry, p. 70. Miss Burne's 
Shropshire Folk-Lore, p. 553. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 115. Kidson's Traditional 
Tunes, pp. 49 and 173. English Folk-Songs for Schools, 7th ed.. No. 15. 

American variants: — Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 49. Journal of 
American Folk-Lore, xxv., 12, and xxix., 172. 



Notes 331 



No. 53. Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth. 

Texts without tunes: — Broadside by W. Wright (Birmingham). Garret's Merrie Book 

of Garlands, vol. ii. 
Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 113. Cliristie's Traditional 

Ballad Airs, ii., 282 (tune only). 

Mrs. Sands's song is a shortened and condensed version of the broadside ballad — which 
consists of 56 stanzas, i.e. 22\ lines! In the original story. Jemmy's love for Nancy of Yarmouth 
is opposed by her father, who, however, promises his consent to their marriage if Jemmy 
returns safely from an ocean voyage. Jemmy accordingly sails for the Barbadoes where his 
"comely features" attract the attention, and arouse the love, of the "Perbadus {i.e. Barbadoes) 
lady whose fortune was great." Jemmy is constant to his first love, and the Perbadus lady, 
thwarted in her desires, commits suicide. Nancy's father, hearing that Jemmy is returning, 
writes to his friend the boatswain and promises him a handsome reward if he "the life of young 
Jemmy would end. " The boatswain accepts the bribe and "tumbles " the unfortunate Jemmy 
"into the deep. " The conclusion of the story is correctly given in the text. 

No. 55. Jack Went A-Sailing. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 45. Broad- 
side by Such. 

Text with tune: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 22'j. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xii., 249; xx., 270; xxv., 9. Wyman 
and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 38. Lomax's Cowboy Songs, p. 204. 

No. 57. The Lover's Lament. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 268; xxvi., 176. 

No. 58. The Dear Companion. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Grieg's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 169. 

The tune may be a variant of "The Dowie Dens o' Yarrow" (see Journal of the Folk-Song 
Society, v., no, first version). 

No. 61. The True Lover's Farewell. 

Texts without tunes: — Henley and Henderson's Centenary Burns, art. "A red, red rose." 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 164. Journal of the Folk- 
Song Society, iii., 86; iv., 286. Roxhurghe Ballads (Ballad Society, No. 33, Pt. xxii., 
vol. vii.). Butterworth's Folk-Songs from Sussex, No. 10. 

Stanzas 4 and 5 in A occur elsewhere in ballad literature, e.g. "The Lass of Roch Royal" 
(^Child, No. 76). 

No. 62. Katey Morey. 

The tune is a variant of "The Dowie Dens o' Yarrow, " several versions of which are given 
in The Journal of the Folk-Song Society, v., 110-113. 

No. 64. The Waggoner's Lad. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 268. Wjonan and Brockway'j 
Lonesome Tunes, p. 62. 

No. 65. Come All ye Fair and Tender Ladies. 

American variants: — Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 55. 



332 Notes 

No. 67. Handsome Sally. 

Text with tune: — Joyce's Old Irish Folk Music, p. 193. 

No. 68. William and Polly. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxv., 10. 

No. 70. Poor Omie. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 265-6. 

No. 72. Early, Early in the Spring. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 128. Logan's 

Pedlar's Pack of Ballads, p. 29. Broadside by Bloomer of Birmingham. 
Text with tune : — Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 70. 

In the version given by Logan, the hero is present at the siege of Carthagena. If this is 
the correct reading, the ballad must refer to Admiral Vernon's expedition to the West Indies 
in 1793. 

No. 74. Betsy. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 80. 
American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xii., 245. 

No. 75. If you Want to Go A-Courting. 

Compare the tune with that of "The Crabfish," Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 59. 

No. 80. Locks and Bolts. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 8. 
Text with tune: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, l, 37. 

Christie states that this ballad "is supposed to refer to the return of Ensign Knight to 
claim Miss Erskine of Pittodrie as his bride." 

No. 81. William and Nancy. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xx., 273. 

No. 82. George Reilly. 

Text without tune: — Garret's Merrie Book of Garlands, vol. iii. 
Text with tune: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 243. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 397. Wyman and Brock- 
way's Lonesome Tunes, p. 34. 

No. 83. Johnny Doyle. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 102. 

Texts with Ixmes:— Journal of the Folk-Sotig Society, v., 142. Herbert Hughes's Songs 

of Uladh. Journal of the Irish Folk-Song Society, i., 66. Petrie's Collection of Irish 

Music, Nos. 443, 629 and 630 (all without words). 

No. 86. The Single Girl. 

Compare last phrase of the tune with that of "Brochan Lorn, Tana Lorn" {Journal of the 
Folk-Song Society, iv., 192). 






Notes ^ 333 

No. 87. John Hardy. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, vi., 134 (with tune). 

This is clearly a modem production despite the "sequence of relatives" and the employ- 
ment of the two beautiful stanzas (Nos. 7 and 8) from "The Lass of Roch Royal" (see Note to 
No. 61). No better proof could be adduced of the way in which the mountain singers have 
assimilated and acquired the technique of balladry. 

No. 88. Betty Anne. 

American variant: — Journal of A^nerican Folk-Lore, vi., 134 (with tune). 

No. 89. My Boy Billy. 

Texts without tunes: — Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, pp. 89 and 328. Barmg- 

Gould's Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 36. 
Texts with tunes: — Rimbault's Nursery Rhymes, p. 34. Folk-Songs of England, iv., p. 6. 
American variant: — Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 14. 

No. 90. Soldier, Won't you Marry Me. 

Text with tune: — Percy Dearmer and Martin Shaw's Songtime, p. 82 (used as a child- 
ren's game). 

No. 91. Swananoah Town. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvi., 163 (with tune). 

No. 93. The Keys of Heaven. 

Text without tune: — Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 92. 

Texts with tunes: — Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Tales, p. 27. English 

County Songs, p. 32. Songs of the West, 2nd ed., No. 22. Folk Songs from Somerset, 

No. 63. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 85; iv., 297. 
American variant: — Newell's Games and Sotigs of American Children, p. 51. 

No. 94. The False Young Man. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 199. Folk-Songs of England, 
ii., 16. Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 152. 

The stanza Ai, B4 and C2 is evidently a reminiscence of a similar verse of "Young Hunt- 
ing," from which this ballad has probably been derived. Compare the tunes A, B and E 
with those of "The Daemon Lover" (No. 29). The tune of C and some of its words are 
reminiscent of "The True Lover's Farewell" (No. 61). 

No. 95. Pretty Peggy O. 

Texts without times: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 15. Ford's 
Vagabond Songs and Ballads, p. 121. Broadside, "Pretty Peggy of Derby" by Pitts. 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, L, 277. 

"Pretty Girl of Derby 0," is the name of the air to which Thomas Moore, under the 
mistaken impression that it was an Irish tune, set his "Evelyn's Bower." In the set given by 
Ford, cited above, the scene is laid in Derby, but in Christie's version and the two variants 
noted by Gavin Greig Fyvie is substituted for Derby. 



334 . Notes 



No. 96. My Parents Treated me Tenderly. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the Norlh-East, {., art. 83. Broad- 
side by Such. 
American variant: — Wjmian and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 76. 

No. 97. The Sheffield Apprentice. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the Norlh-East, i., art. 45. Broad- 
sides by Harkness (Preston) and Pitts. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 67. Journal of the Folk-Song 
Society, i., 200; ii., 169. Folk-Songs of E71 gland, ii., 44. 

American variant: — Broadside by H. De Marsan (New York). 

No. 98. The Broken Token. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 23. Broadside 
by Brereton (Dublin). 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 265; ii., 201. Songs of the 
West, 2nd ed., No. 44. Journal of the Folk-So?ig Society, iv., 127. English Folk-Songs 
for Schools, 7th ed., p. 82. Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 45. Miss Broadwood's 
Traditional Songs and Carols, p. 26. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 67. Wyman and Brock- 
way's Lonesome Tunes, p. 88. 

No. loi. The Brisk Yoimg Lover. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 175. 

Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, i., 252; ii., 155 and 168; v., 181. 

Miss Broadwood's Traditional Songs and Carols, p. 92. Butterworth's Folk Songs 

from Sussex, No. 7. Kidson's Traditional Tunes, p. 44. Mrs. Leather's Folk-Lore 

of Herefordshire, p. 205. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 78 (tune only); xxv., 13. 

Broadside by H. De Marsan (New York). 

No. 104. Loving Reilly. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 143. Broad- 
side by Brereton (DubUn). 
Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, ii., 145. Journal of the Folk- 
Song Society, iii., 133. Petrie's Collection of Irish Music, No. 510 (tune only). 

William Carleton published a novel, "Willy Reilly and his dear Colleen Bawn, " founded 
on this song. 

No. 105. The Awful Wedding. 

Text without tune: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 24. 

No. 106. Sweet William. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 64. Broad- 
side by T. Evans. Garret's Merrie Book of Garlands, vol. i. 

Texts with tunes: — Christie's Traditional Ballad Airs, i., 248. Journal of the Folk- 
Song Society, l, 99. English County Songs, p. 74. Novello's School Songs, No. 993. 

No. 107. Good-Moming, my Pretty Little Miss. 

Text without tune: — "A Gentleman's Meeting" in William Garret's Merrie Book of 

Garlands, vol. i. 
Texts with tunes: — Journal of the Folk-Song Society, iii., 296; iv., 281. Songs of the 

West, 1st ed.. No. 23. 



Notes * 335 



No. io8. My Mother Bid me. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 149. Bell's 

Ballads of the Peasantry, p. 237. 
Texts with tunes: — Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs, p. 33. Kidson's 

Traditional Tunes, p. 92. 

No. 109. The Ten Commandments. 

Texts without tunes: — Sandys's Christmas Carols, p. 135. Baring-Gould's Nursery 

Songs and Rhymes, p. 62. 
Texts with tunes: — Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 87. Songs of the West, 2nd ed., No. 

78. Ejiglish County Songs, p. 154. 

No. no. The Tree in the Wood. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, L, art. 87. Baring- 
Gould's Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 33. 

Texts with tunes: — Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs, p. 26. English 
County Songs, p. 175. Songs of the West, ist ed., No. 104. Folk Songs from Somerset, 
No. 93. Journal of the Welsh Folk-Song Society, i., 40. 

American variants: — Newell's Games and Songs of American Children, p. III. One 
Hundred English Folk-Songs (Ditson), No. 98. 

No. III. The Farmyard. 

Texts without tunes: — Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, ii., art. 159. Halli- 
well's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 332. Chambers's Popular Rhymes of Scotland, 
ed. 1847, p. 190. 

Text with tune: — Novello's School Songs, No. 985. 

American variant: — Wyman and Brock way's Lonesome Tunes, p. 6. 

No. 112. The Drummer and his Wife. 

Text without tune: — Ford's Song Histories, pp. 39-47. 

Texts with tunes: — English Folk-Songs for Schools, 7th ed., No. 3. Journal of the Irish 

Folk-Song Society, i., 44. 
American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvi., 365; xxix., 173. 

No. 114. Sotirwood Moimtain. 

American variant: — Wyman and Brockway's Lonesome Tunes, p. 91. 

No. 115. The Foolish Boy. 

Texts without tunes: — Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 37. Baring-Gould's 
Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 17. Gavin Greig's Folk-Song of the North-East, i., art. 

43. 
Texts with tunes: — Miss IMason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs, p. 16. Rim- 

bault's Nursery Rhymes, No. 19. English Folk-Songs for Schools, 7th ed.. No. 52. 
American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvi., 143. 

No. 116. Harm Link. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxix., 181. 

No. 119. [ A Frog he Went A-Courting. 
No. 120. i" The Frog in the Well. 

Texts without tunes: — Baring-Gould's Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 27. Ford's 
Children's Rhymes, Games and Songs, pp. 122-6. 



336 Notes 

Texts with tunes: — English Folk-Songs for Schools, 7th ed., Nos. 43 and 44. Journal 
of the Irish Folk-Song Society, iv., 22. Journal of the Welsh Folk-Song Society, i., 178. 
Journal of the Folk-Song Society, ii., 226. Alclismata. Pills to Purge Melancholy, ed. 
1719, vol. i. Baring-Gould's A Garland of Country Song, No. 13. Joyce's Old Irish 
Folk Music, p. 331 (tune only). Chappell's Popular Music of the Olden Time, p. 88. 
Airs. Leather's Folk-Lore of Herefordshire, p. 209. 

American variants: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxii., 74 (tune only); xxvi., 134. 
Wyman and Brock way's Lonesome Tunes, p. 25. 

No. 121. The Carrion Crow. 

Texts without tunes: — Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 46. Baring-Gould's 

Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 39. Bell's Ballads of the Peasantry, p. 202. Ford's 

Children's Rhymes, Games and Songs, p. 126. 
Texts with tunes: — A Garland of Country Song, No. 46. English Folk-Songs for Schools, 

7th ed., No. 48. 

No. 122. The Old Grey Mare. 

American variant: — Journal of American Folk-Lore, xxvi., 123 (with tune). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

BOOKS REFERRED TO IN THE NOTES 

The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, F. E. Child, Houghton Mifflin & Co., Boston, 

Mass., U. S. A., 1882-1898. 5 vols. 
Ancient Scottish Ballads, G. R. Kinloch. Longman, London, 1827. 
Minstrelsy: Ancient and Modern, William Motherwell. John Wyhe, Glasgow, 1827. 
Folk-Song of the North-East (Scotland), Articles contributed to "The Buchan Observer, " 

Gavin Greig. "Buchan Observer" Works, Peterhead, 1909 and 1914. 2 series. 
Popular Music of the Olden Time, William Chappell. Chappell & Co., London, 1855-9. 2 vols. 
A Century of Ballads, John Ashton. Elliot Stock, London, 1887. 
The Roxburghe Ballads. Hertford, 1871-1896. 8 vols. 
Modern Street Ballads, John Ashton. Chatto & Windus, London, 1888. 
Ballads and Songs of the Peasatitry, Robert Bell. Griffin, Bohn & Co., London, 1861. 
Popular Rhymes of Scotland, Robert Chambers. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1826; 3rd ed., 1870. 
Tlie Songs of Scotland Prior to Burns, Robert Chambers. W. & R. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1890. 
Shropshire Folk-Lore, Miss Charlotte S. Bume. Trubner & Co., London, 1 884-1 886. 
A Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and Songs, W. H. Logan. William Patterson, Edinburgh, 1869. 
Right Choyse and Merrie Book of Garlands, William Garret. Newcastle, 181 8. 4 vols. 
The Folk-Lore of Herefordshire, Mrs. E. M. Leather. Sidgwick & Jackson, London, 1912. 
Songs of the Nativity, W. H. Husk. J. C. Hotten, London, 187-? 
Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern, William Sandys. R. Beckley, London, 1823. 
Ancient Mysteries Described, William Hone. William Reeves, London, 1823. 
Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland, Robert Ford. Alexander Gardner, Paisley, new ed. 

1904. 
Song Histories, Robert Ford. William Hodge & Co., Glasgow and Edinburgh, 1900. 
Children's Rhymes, Games, Songs and Stories, Robert Ford. Alexander Gardner, Paisley, 1904. 
Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Tales of England, James Orchard Halliwell. Wame & Co., 

London; Scribner & Co., New York, 5th ed. 
A Book of Nursery Songs and Rhymes, S. Baring-Gould. Methuen & Co., London. 2nd and 

cheaper ed. 
The Centenary Burns, Henley and Henderson. T. C. & E. C. Jack, Edinburgh, 1 896-1 897, 

4 vols. 
The Songs of Robert Burns, James C. Dick. Henry Frowde, London and New York, 1903. 
Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 19 Bemers Street, London. 5 vols., 1899-1916. In progress. 
Journal of the Welsh Folk-Song Society, Jarvis & Foster, Bangor, N. Wales. Vol. i., 1909- 

19 1 6. In progress. 
Journal of the Irish Folk-Song Society, London. Irish Literary Society, 20 Hanover Square, 

London, W. 5 vols., 1904-7. 
Songs and Ballads of the West, Rev. S. Baring-Gould and Rev. H. Fleetwood Sheppard. 

Methuen & Co. London, ist ed., 4 Parts, 1889-1891; 2nd ed., 1905. 
Traditional Tunes, Frank Kidson. Charles Taphouse & Son, Oxford, 1891. 

2>2>7 



338 Bibliography 

Northumbrian Minstrelsy, Collingwood Bruce and John Stokoe. Society of Antiquaries of 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1882. 
English County Songs, Lucy Broadwood and J. A. Fuller Maitland. Leadenhall Press, London, 

and Charles Scribner & Sons, New York. 
A Garland of Country Song, S. Baring-Gould and H. Fleetwood Sheppard. Methuen & Co., 

London, 1895. 
Traditional Ballad Airs, Dean Christie. Edmonston & Douglas, Edinburgh, 1876-1881. 2 

vols. 
Musical Illustrations of Bishop Percy's Reliques. Edward Rimbault. Cramer & Co., London, 

1850. 
Folk Songs from Somerset, Cecil J. Sharp and Rev. Charles L. Marson. Schott & Co., London, 

1 904-1 909. 5 series. 
English Traditional Songs and Carols, Miss Lucy Broadwood. Boosey & Co., London, 1908. 
Folk Songs from Sussex, George Butterworth. Augener, London, and Boston Music Co., 

Boston, 1912. 
English Folk-Songs for Schools, S. Baring-Gould and Cecil J. Sharp. J. Curwen & Sons, 

London, 1906. 
School Songs, Cecil J. Sharp. Novello & Co., London. Sets 1-5. 
Song Time, Percy Dearmer and Martin Shaw. J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1915. 
Folk-Songs of England, edited by Cecil J. Sharp. Book i., H. E. D. Hammond and Cecil J. 

Sharp; Book ii., Ralph Vaughan Williams; Book iii., G. B. Gardiner and Gustav von 

Hoist; Book iv., Cecil J. Sharp; Book v., Percy Merrick and Ralph Vaughan Williams. 

Novello & Co., London, 1908-1912. 
The Scots Musical Museum, James Johnson, ist ed., Edinburgh, 1 787-1 803, 6 vols. 3rd 

ed., Edinburgh and London, 1853, 4 vols. 
Some Ancient Christmas Carols, Davies Gilbert. John Nichols & Son, London. 1st ed., 1822, 

2nd ed., 1823. 
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1911. 
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Old Nursery Rhymes, Ed. F. Rimbault. Chappell & Co., London. Reprinted. 
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Boosey & Co., London, 1903. 
Old Irish Folk Music and Songs, P. W. Joyce. Longmans & Co., London, 1909. 3 parts. 
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London. New and enlarged ed., 1903. 
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INDEX OF TITLES 

PAGE 

Awake! Awake! ' 173 

Awful Wedding, The 292 

Barbara Allen 90 

Betsy 236 

Betty Anne 259 

Bird Song, The 310 

Black is the Colour 255 

Boatsman and the Chest, The 163 

Brisk Young Lover, The 286 

Broken Token, The 281 

Brown Girl, The 145 

Carrion Crow, The 320 

Cherry-Tree Carol, The 43 

Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies 220 

Come All You Young and Handsome Girls 289 

Cruel Brother, The 20 

Cruel Mother, The 29 

Cruel Ship's Carpenter, The 154 

Daemon Lover, The 119 

Dear Companion, The 204 

Drummer and His Wife, The 308 

Earl Brand 9 

Early, Early in the Spring 232 

Edward 26 

Edwin in the Lowlands Low 169 

Fair Annie 45 

Fair Margaret and Sweet William 62 

False Knight Upon the Road, The i 

False Young Man, The 269 

Fanner's Curst Wife, The 139 

Farmyard, The 307 

Foolish Boy, The 313 

Frog He Went A-courting, A 317 

Frog in the Well, The 3^9 

Geordie Ii7 

George Reilly 249 

Giles Collins 100 

Golden Glove, The 182 

Golden Vanity, The 142 

Good Morning, My Pretty Little Miss 296 

Green Bed, The 176 

Grey Cock, The 128 

Gypsy Laddie, The 112 

339 



340 Index 

PAGE 

Handsome Sally 224 

Harm Link 214 

Harry Gray 244 

Hick's Farewell 227 

Holly Twig, The '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 165 

I'm Going to Georgia 243 

.1 Whipped My Horse 316 

Ibby Damsel 223 

If You Want to Go A-courting 238 

In Seaport Town i^i 

Jack Went A-Sailing 189 

John Hardy 257 

Johnie Scot 109 

Johnny Doyle 251 

Katie Morey 211 

Keys of Heaven, The 264 

Lady and the Dragoon, The 161 

Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight 3 

Lamkin 104 

Lazarus 253 

Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 78 

Locks and Bolts 245 

Lord Lovel 71 

Lord Randal 22 

Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor 55 

Lover's Lament, The 200 

Loving Reilly 290 

Maid Freed from the Gallows, The 106 

Married and Single Life 235 

My Boy Billy 260 

My Dearest Dear 242 

My Mother Bid Me 298 

My Parents Treated Me Tenderly 276 

Old Grey Mare, The 321 

Our Goodman 134 

Polly Oliver 167 

Poor Omie 228 

Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth 184 

Pretty Peggy 274 

Pretty Saro 239 

Putman's Hill 268 

Rain and Snow ., 214 

Rejected Lover, The 197 

Rich Old Lady, The 168 

Rocky Mountain Top, The 205 

Seven Long Years 288 

Sheffield Apprentice, The 278 

Shoemaker, The 285 

Shooting of His Dear I59 

Silk Merchant's Daughter, The 186 

Simple Ploughboy 178 

Sing Said the Mother 315 

Single Girl, The 256 

Sir Hugh 1 1 1 

Sir Lionel 28 



Index 341 



PAGE 

Soldier, Won't You Marry me? 262 

Sourwood Mountain 312 

Suffolk Miracle, The 130 

Swannanoa Town 263 

Sweet William 293 

Ten Commandments, The 300 

Three Butchers, The 1 79 

Three Ravens, The 32 

Tree in the Wood, The 302 

Trooper and the Maid, The 149 

True Lover's Farewell, The 208 

Two Brothers, The 33 

Two Sisters, The 16 

Virginian Lover, The 231 

Wagoner's Lad, The 215 

Warfare is Raging, The 206 

Wife of Usher's Well, The 73 

Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin, The 137 

Wild Bill Jones 284 

William and Nancy 248 

William and Polly 225 

William Taylor l8l 

Young Beichan 38 

Young Hxmting 47 



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